Protein

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    Feb 09, 2012 1:53 AM GMT
    When should I be eating a protein bar or any snack higher in protein? Before or after my workouts?
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    Feb 09, 2012 2:01 AM GMT
    aworknprogress saidWhen should I be eating a protein bar or any snack higher in protein? Before or after my workouts?


    It depends on what kind of protein it contains. Whey is really good 30 mins or so after you work out.

    If it just says "protein bar" without any specifics, it probably doesnt matter when you eat it, but rather serves as just another way to get sufficient protein for muscle building etc.
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    Feb 09, 2012 2:08 AM GMT
    Heavy carbs preworkout for fuel especially if the exercise will last longer
    than an hour. BCAAs intra-workout. Carbs post workout to replenish glycogen stores, and protein for repair and recovery. Slow digesting protein such as casein before bed to further repair, recovery, and hypertrophy.
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    Feb 09, 2012 2:10 AM GMT
    Don't eat it before your workouts. It will just sit in your stomach and isn't a source of energy for exercise.

    Bars are to be used when you are just too rushed for eating real food or real food is highly inconvenient to procure.

    Short answer is after your workouts (ASAP--30 min is late...), unless you haven't eaten within 3 hours before your workout. If that's the case, then give yourself at least 45 min before you start working out.


    Kind of protein doesn't matter. Yes, whey protein is absorbed and cleared the fasted. Soy protein is also absorbed fast and is just as good as whey for all practical purposes, but the dairy counsel sponsors research studies and grants and would lose money if the general public found out that there's nothing wrong with soy and that it costs the US exponentially less to produce compared to something like whey. You could even use vegetarian sources of protein and get results--ever see veganbodybuilding.com?

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    Feb 09, 2012 2:13 AM GMT
    LeanVA saidHeavy carbs preworkout for fuel especially if the exercise will last longer
    than an hour. BCAAs intra-workout. Carbs post workout to replenish glycogen stores, and protein for repair and recovery. Slow digesting protein such as casein before bed to further repair, recovery, and hypertrophy.


    BCAAs are a waste of money. There's not enough research showing they work and there is no clear mechanism for their function. There are purported mechanisms, but nothing in the literature.

    Agree with carbs before workout, but that should be in the form of either simple sugar (banana/sweetened beverage) 5-10 min before OR something broken down steadily like unsweetened oatmeal, popcorn, brown rice 30-45 min before.
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    Feb 09, 2012 2:43 AM GMT
    bluey2223 saidBCAAs are a waste of money. There's not enough research showing they work and there is no clear mechanism for their function. There are purported mechanisms, but nothing in the literature.

    Agree with carbs before workout, but that should be in the form of either simple sugar (banana/sweetened beverage) 5-10 min before OR something broken down steadily like unsweetened oatmeal, popcorn, brown rice 30-45 min before.


    Here is a joint study (or rather a video discussion of the study, I should say) between Dr. Stoppani and the College of Charleston on BCAAs ingestion intra-worout:

    http://www.muscleandfitness.com/videos/mf-raw/raw-nutrition/mf-raw-nutrition-8-bcaa-benefits-and-tips

    As for carbs, I go by what NASM recommends: "a high-carbohydrate meal 2 to 4 hours before exercising for more than an hour." They also suggest "a carbohydrate intake of 1 to 4.5 g/kg, between 1 and 4 hours before exercise, respectively."

    I didn't specify in my earlier post which types of carbs. I only meant "heavy" as in "high" or "large amount." My apologies for the lack of clarity.
    Your point about simple versus complex carbs is noteworthy though. Thanks for sharing that.
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    Feb 09, 2012 12:42 PM GMT
    Thanks for the thoughtful responses guys. I think I know now what I need to do. icon_smile.gif
  • tuffguyndc

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    Feb 09, 2012 1:20 PM GMT
    it depends on your fitness goals. if you want to put on muscle. i always tell people to take the shake a hour before and immediately afterwards with a banana. all the other times you should be eating food
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    Feb 09, 2012 6:45 PM GMT
    LeanVA said
    bluey2223 saidBCAAs are a waste of money. There's not enough research showing they work and there is no clear mechanism for their function. There are purported mechanisms, but nothing in the literature.

    Agree with carbs before workout, but that should be in the form of either simple sugar (banana/sweetened beverage) 5-10 min before OR something broken down steadily like unsweetened oatmeal, popcorn, brown rice 30-45 min before.


    Here is a joint study (or rather a video discussion of the study, I should say) between Dr. Stoppani and the College of Charleston on BCAAs ingestion intra-worout:


    The video is on Muscle and Fitness website, of which Stoppani is a science writer and benefits from the supplement industry both on a salary and in research grants. There is a huge conflict of interest in any research this man does. He is smart enough to mess with variables to produce results. He is not esteemed in the scientific community due to his bias.

    Dr. Stoppani is obviously on a lot of other "supplements" as well and is marketing a product that he feels you should basically eat all the time throughout the day, according to the video posted. Muscle&Fitness magazine is capitalistic and will thus capitalize on an unregulated industry and a naive market. Most people who are beginning a fitness regimen won't know that supplements are marketing tools to make more money and are allowed because of the lack of regulation in the industry. In fact, 1 in 4 supplements in the US do not have what they say they have on the label. This can mean:
    1) They have something else
    2) they have more than what they're supposed to have
    3) they don't have any active ingredient
    4) Joe-muscle wouldn't know the difference
    5) Joe-muscle may like a product more if it had performance enhancing ingredients that give him results due to illegal ingredients
    6) NCAA and professional athletes test positive for drug use because of these ingredients

    Source (one of many): http://newhope360.com/retailing/what-do-supplements-really-cost?cid=nl_360_daily (page 2 in lay article)

    http://www.consumerlab.com/recalls.asp (referenced in above article, a legit website)

    http://www.askscooby.com/supplements/who-to-believe-dr-jim-stoppani-or-consumers-reports-magazine/
    (scooby's forum posts are also for a lay audience, but the point is still true)

    I just took an ergogenic aids class with a professor twice Stoppani's age who doesn't have sleave tatoos and is on the frontier of sports nutrition research and has much more known in the sports nutrition world, Dr. Ivy, who said that BCAAs are supposed to work by mitigating the fatigue associated with the increase in the conversion of dopamine to serotonin in the brain during exercise as a result of adenosine influx into the blood from muscles (as a result of ATP breakdown), which crosses the blood-brain barrier to influence the dopamine/serotonin balance. If you increase serotonin, you feel fatigue. BCAAs are also oxidized more in endurance activities, such as running/biking/swimming for over an hour...Not a significant pathway for strength training or body building. These pathways haven't been studied well enough for someone to market BCAAs like this (his site is bro-science and not something I would recommend to any client of mine) based on one study, when other similar studies haven't shown such definitive results.

    In Stoppani's study, he was able to manipulate the variables to show that BCAAs are better than eating whey. I'm going to listen to a tenured professor of UT rather than some Muscle and Fitness writer with sleave tatoos and a kitchen full of supplements. Who knows what other stuff he is doing. Furthermore, he doesn't look healthy. (subjective opinions of mine)

    BCAAs, or branched-chain amino acids, leucine, isoleucine, and valine, are essential amino acids that are provided in regular dietary protein intake. Everyone eats them everyday if you are eating enough protein, which the average American eats as much as a bodybuilder would need without supplements by eating three meals and two snacks a day.

    I conducted a Google Scholar search, Academic Search Complete, and Pubmed searches on BCAA supplementation and exercise and haven't found anything except his article showing such a definitive result. Plus, I'm not going to play roulette with the supplement industry and hope to get one of the 3 out of 4 that are not contaminated or spiked with something that's gonna make me jacked and will increase my chance of liver cancer later, among the other effects of steroids.
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    Feb 09, 2012 7:28 PM GMT
    About 6 years ago I studied as much academic data that wasn't funded by supplement companies or lobbiest groups. In the light of good scientific disclosure,I want to point out 3 things :
    1. This was 6 years ago and I don't know of additionally studies between then and now.

    2. there is a plethora of information flooding the internet and fitness sites with pseudo and quasi scientific 'studies' that are speculative, anecdotal or based on samples too small to represent accurate results. Additionally, in my prior studies, I disqualified studies that didn't take other important variables into account.

    3. Beside the genetic variability of individual responses, there are many people who've followed a regimen for many years that has worked for them. This doesn't mean that it is effective, since often, other the years, adaptations have crept into these routines (both in terms of exercise as well as diet and schedule) that anen't accounted for as well as the fact that over a long period of time (years) the body will adapt to sometimes less than effective habits.

    This is a somewhat over simplified collection of my data which was specifically geared to toning and building muscle mass (not competition bodybuilding but not triathlon training either.)
    1. Workout on an empty stomach. If you can workout in the morning. If you must eat something, a banana is acceptable as long as it's 30-60 prior to working out.
    2. Protein within 1/2 hour after your workout is complete. Carbohydrates are also good here, but avoid carbohydrates that are largely simple starches. Eat similarly every 3 hours and not in large amounts (typically 6-8oz boneless chicken breast without fatty, starchy or salty sauces or a similar amount of fish. Lean red meat is OK occasionally if your workouts meet or exceed 6 hours a week.
    3. No eating after the point of 3 hours prior to sleeping. (2 hours if scheduling doesn't permit 3 hours)
    4. Drink plenty of water, or low sugar, low caffeine drinks. Focus more on the water than the diet soda.
    5. Protein shakes and bars are OK as a substitute for no more than one or two of the meals. Read the ingredients to make sure there isn't a lot of fat or sugar in them.
    6. Eat as much low starch vegetables and fruit as you like. Focus less on the fruit because of sugar content.
    7. Egg White protein shakes are your best bet because of the protein balance and because it's more effectively absorbed. (These are best right after a workout if you on your way to work and a meal is inconvenient.) Also, protein shakes shouldn't be 'downed quickly'. Your body can't digest huge amounts of protein at one time and what doesn't go through you (if you know what I mean - in addition to other socially unpleasant side effects) may be converted to fat.
    8. Fat-free is a bad diet approach. A small amount of healthy fats are healthy and will actually prevent you from storing fat.
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    Feb 09, 2012 7:43 PM GMT
    Good info, MuchMoreThanMuscle

    MuchMoreThanMuscleSince I have adopted intermittent fasting as a way of eating I have really slimmed down and have never been more lean. And the great thing is, I'm working much less in the gym.

    Same here.
    MuchMoreThanMuscleBut according to Martin's philosophy on losing fat, it's best not to consume carbs before a workout.

    He does recommend carbs before wo. Or BCAA's if training fasted. This depends on the meal pattern chosen by the trainee.

    From: http://www.leangains.com/2009/12/fasted-training-boosts-muscle-growth.html

    "The immediate pre-workout meal should contain no more than a moderate amount of low glycemic index carbs. The exact amount would depend on many factors, total workout volume being the biggest one to consider, but a good guideline for a moderate volume weight training session is approximately 0.6 - 0.8 g carb per kilogram body weight or 0.3 - 0.4 g per pound of body weight. Have this meal 1.5 - 2.5 hours before your training session."

    Never train on a completely empty stomach. At least have some BCAA's in you.

    Personally I follow 2 pre meals and 1 post meal pattern due to my work schedule.
    MuchMoreThanMuscle
    I would avoid those protein bars. They are full of preservatives and a bunch of other crap that you don't need.


    I would suggest taking some BCAA before your workout and then eating some source of good protein afterward.

    Agreed. Then again depends on your meal pattern choice. See the leangains site for details if you choose to do IF.
    MuchMoreThanMuscle
    Oh, by the way. My post workout meal consists of sweet potatoes and lean chicken breasts. I no longer buy those liquid protein drinks nor do I buy any protein powder anymore.

    Same here. Stopped buying protein powders a couple of years ago. Never used the protein bars. They are just glorified bad tasting candy bars. However if you are in a pinch, some food is better than no food, I suppose. If you can do a whey shake, that would prob be better than the bar.
    MuchMoreThanMuscle
    If interested, check out his site: leangains.com

    Lots of great info there.

    To the OP. This depends on what your training goal is. It is important to always train for according to your goal.

    If you are using IF to bulk then Martin had said "Leangains works best if you are already 12-10% BF. " He also does say that IF may not be for everyone.

    If you are doing a cut, then you need to adapt your training accordingly. Reduce the metabolic work (higher rep work) as you are in a caloric deficit and hence it is unlikely you will grow. Train for strength as you want to reduce fat while retaining muscle.
  • tuffguyndc

    Posts: 4437

    Feb 09, 2012 7:49 PM GMT
    bgcat57 saidAbout 6 years ago I studied as much academic data that wasn't funded by supplement companies or lobbiest groups. In the light of good scientific disclosure,I want to point out 3 things :
    1. This was 6 years ago and I don't know of additionally studies between then and now.

    2. there is a plethora of information flooding the internet and fitness sites with pseudo and quasi scientific 'studies' that are speculative, anecdotal or based on samples too small to represent accurate results. Additionally, in my prior studies, I disqualified studies that didn't take other important variables into account.

    3. Beside the genetic variability of individual responses, there are many people who've followed a regimen for many years that has worked for them. This doesn't mean that it is effective, since often, other the years, adaptations have crept into these routines (both in terms of exercise as well as diet and schedule) that anen't accounted for as well as the fact that over a long period of time (years) the body will adapt to sometimes less than effective habits.

    This is a somewhat over simplified collection of my data which was specifically geared to toning and building muscle mass (not competition bodybuilding but not triathlon training either.)
    1. Workout on an empty stomach. If you can workout in the morning. If you must eat something, a banana is acceptable as long as it's 30-60 prior to working out.
    2. Protein within 1/2 hour after your workout is complete. Carbohydrates are also good here, but avoid carbohydrates that are largely simple starches. Eat similarly every 3 hours and not in large amounts (typically 6-8oz boneless chicken breast without fatty, starchy or salty sauces or a similar amount of fish. Lean red meat is OK occasionally if your workouts meet or exceed 6 hours a week.
    3. No eating after the point of 3 hours prior to sleeping. (2 hours if scheduling doesn't permit 3 hours)
    4. Drink plenty of water, or low sugar, low caffeine drinks. Focus more on the water than the diet soda.
    5. Protein shakes and bars are OK as a substitute for no more than one or two of the meals. Read the ingredients to make sure there isn't a lot of fat or sugar in them.
    6. Eat as much low starch vegetables and fruit as you like. Focus less on the fruit because of sugar content.
    7. Egg White protein shakes are your best bet because of the protein balance and because it's more effectively absorbed. (These are best right after a workout if you on your way to work and a meal is inconvenient.) Also, protein shakes shouldn't be 'downed quickly'. Your body can't digest huge amounts of protein at one time and what doesn't go through you (if you know what I mean - in addition to other socially unpleasant side effects) may be converted to fat.
    8. Fat-free is a bad diet approach. A small amount of healthy fats are healthy and will actually prevent you from storing fat.


    I think most of what you have said is very true. HOwever, I totally disagree with working out on a empty stomach. That is never a good idea especially if you want to get the most out of your workouts. Here is what I usually tell people. Eating a high carbs meal is better. However, make it quality carbs and have a small amount of protein. I usually do a PB&J or I have oatmeal and turkey sausage for breakfast. I have this a hour and 30 minutes before workouts. Except for the BP&J sandwich. I eat that 45 minutes before my workout. I usually try and have a banana during my workout. The only time you should workout on a empty stomach is if you are doing cardio. That is the only time it is ok do workout on a empty stomach. Also, I always tell people eat piece of fruit and protein shake immediately after your workout.
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    Feb 09, 2012 9:28 PM GMT
    bluey2223 saidThe video is on Muscle and Fitness website, of which Stoppani is a science writer and benefits from the supplement industry both on a salary and in research grants. There is a huge conflict of interest in any research this man does. He is smart enough to mess with variables to produce results. He is not esteemed in the scientific community due to his bias.

    Dr. Stoppani is obviously on a lot of other "supplements" as well and is marketing a product that he feels you should basically eat all the time throughout the day, according to the video posted. Muscle&Fitness magazine is capitalistic and will thus capitalize on an unregulated industry and a naive market. Most people who are beginning a fitness regimen won't know that supplements are marketing tools to make more money and are allowed because of the lack of regulation in the industry. In fact, 1 in 4 supplements in the US do not have what they say they have on the label. This can mean:
    1) They have something else
    2) they have more than what they're supposed to have
    3) they don't have any active ingredient
    4) Joe-muscle wouldn't know the difference
    5) Joe-muscle may like a product more if it had performance enhancing ingredients that give him results due to illegal ingredients
    6) NCAA and professional athletes test positive for drug use because of these ingredients

    Source (one of many): http://newhope360.com/retailing/what-do-supplements-really-cost?cid=nl_360_daily (page 2 in lay article)

    http://www.consumerlab.com/recalls.asp (referenced in above article, a legit website)

    http://www.askscooby.com/supplements/who-to-believe-dr-jim-stoppani-or-consumers-reports-magazine/
    (scooby's forum posts are also for a lay audience, but the point is still true)

    I just took an ergogenic aids class with a professor twice Stoppani's age who doesn't have sleave tatoos and is on the frontier of sports nutrition research and has much more known in the sports nutrition world, Dr. Ivy, who said that BCAAs are supposed to work by mitigating the fatigue associated with the increase in the conversion of dopamine to serotonin in the brain during exercise as a result of adenosine influx into the blood from muscles (as a result of ATP breakdown), which crosses the blood-brain barrier to influence the dopamine/serotonin balance. If you increase serotonin, you feel fatigue. BCAAs are also oxidized more in endurance activities, such as running/biking/swimming for over an hour...Not a significant pathway for strength training or body building. These pathways haven't been studied well enough for someone to market BCAAs like this (his site is bro-science and not something I would recommend to any client of mine) based on one study, when other similar studies haven't shown such definitive results.

    In Stoppani's study, he was able to manipulate the variables to show that BCAAs are better than eating whey. I'm going to listen to a tenured professor of UT rather than some Muscle and Fitness writer with sleave tatoos and a kitchen full of supplements. Who knows what other stuff he is doing. Furthermore, he doesn't look healthy. (subjective opinions of mine)

    BCAAs, or branched-chain amino acids, leucine, isoleucine, and valine, are essential amino acids that are provided in regular dietary protein intake. Everyone eats them everyday if you are eating enough protein, which the average American eats as much as a bodybuilder would need without supplements by eating three meals and two snacks a day.

    I conducted a Google Scholar search, Academic Search Complete, and Pubmed searches on BCAA supplementation and exercise and haven't found anything except his article showing such a definitive result. Plus, I'm not going to play roulette with the supplement industry and hope to get one of the 3 out of 4 that are not contaminated or spiked with something that's gonna make me jacked and will increase my chance of liver cancer later, among the other effects of steroids.


    Dude, why the level of snark? You may very well be right. I am by far not an expert, but seriously relax. WTH is with all the tattoo jabs and insinuation of steroids (supplements in quotations and "Who knows what other stuff he is doing.")?

    Just argue the facts. Don't go the ad hominem route.
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    Feb 10, 2012 11:11 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidFunny how some people with advanced degrees argue like children and resort to ad hominem tactics to tear up an opponent. I know of so many people with PhD and masters degrees who may be educated in their field but when it comes to having a social discussion - have no maturity whatsoever. And they think because they have these degrees that they know everything. But they just make themselves look quite bad when in debate.


    I couldn't agree more. I'm frequently amazed at the number of people I know with advanced degrees who are morons (sometimes even in their own areas of expertise. Conversely, there are many people without advanced degrees who are brilliant.
    It's that "Wizard of OZ" concept of the piece of paper that somehow confers added intelligence by inference and not by "studying to the test" rather than developing knowledge through critical thinking.

    The Scientist (for example, could be engineer, Dr, etc.) that places effort into proving himself/herself right is the classic bad scientist.
    The Scientist (again, for example, could be engineer, Dr, etc.) that places effort into proving himself/herself wrong is the better scientist.
    The former writes books and promotes dubious ideas on talk shows and the later quietly makes strides in actually improving the human condition.
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    Feb 15, 2012 2:04 AM GMT
    bgcat57 said
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidFunny how some people with advanced degrees argue like children and resort to ad hominem tactics to tear up an opponent. I know of so many people with PhD and masters degrees who may be educated in their field but when it comes to having a social discussion - have no maturity whatsoever. And they think because they have these degrees that they know everything. But they just make themselves look quite bad when in debate.


    I couldn't agree more. I'm frequently amazed at the number of people I know with advanced degrees who are morons (sometimes even in their own areas of expertise. Conversely, there are many people without advanced degrees who are brilliant.
    It's that "Wizard of OZ" concept of the piece of paper that somehow confers added intelligence by inference and not by "studying to the test" rather than developing knowledge through critical thinking.

    The Scientist (for example, could be engineer, Dr, etc.) that places effort into proving himself/herself right is the classic bad scientist.
    The Scientist (again, for example, could be engineer, Dr, etc.) that places effort into proving himself/herself wrong is the better scientist.
    The former writes books and promotes dubious ideas on talk shows and the later quietly makes strides in actually improving the human condition.


    I have him on block so thanks for the quote. It's because you're on steroids and only use anecdotal evidence and hearsay to support anything you say and then you bash those of us who have advanced degrees, which you would be too stupid or lack the motivation to pass the tests or write the papers to obtain. Then you come in and act like an expert. Snark? Yes. Thanks. It is gratifying to me that you get butthurt when you're wrong in a field you're not an expert in. This is how it will be until the government regulates our industry more to get rid of non-health professions posing as experts in fields they aren't experts in.
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    Feb 15, 2012 2:13 AM GMT
    Your reply isn't making you look any better. icon_neutral.gif
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    Feb 15, 2012 2:16 AM GMT
    Oh, shit.......let's just say before AND after.......Now......lol.....icon_lol.gif

    Pardon...you making me nervous.......icon_redface.gif
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    Feb 15, 2012 2:30 AM GMT
    Experiment with what works best for you. Just know that you want BCAAs for sure after your workout.
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    Feb 15, 2012 2:52 AM GMT
    Doing a scholar.google.com search on BCAAs, I found several studies that backed up the study done by Weider Fitness and The College of Charleston. I only found one study that disagreed on intra-workout supplementation (and one that disagreed but only in relation to benefiting high altitude skiers).

    For intra-workout BCAA ingestion:

    http://jn.nutrition.org/content/134/6/1583S.short

    http://www.springerlink.com/content/lv6t834653241120/

    Leucine-enriched essential amino acid supplementation during moderate steady state exercise enhances postexercise muscle protein synthesis.:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21775557

    Against intra-workout BCAA ingestion:

    http://ajpendo.physiology.org/content/281/2/E365.short*

    *Study was still in favor of BCAA supplementation but found that it was beneficial post workout as opposed to intra-workout.

    There were also too many studies that found beneficial evidence of BCAA supplementation (that did not focus on intra-workout ingestion) to link to.

    Above are links to actual studies... not the blog of a "YouTube fitness expert" like Scooby.

  • johny14626

    Posts: 7

    Feb 15, 2012 8:01 AM GMT
    You should divide up your protein intake throughout the day in even quantities because it take the body a while to digest it. It is recommended to have some protein after a workout but not something crazy like 100g right after. A good 30g is okay, and be sure to drink lots of water, and have some potassium from a banana. You can get proteins from a variety of places, the best sources would be whey, rice, eggs, lean meats, and nuts.
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    Feb 15, 2012 5:03 PM GMT
    LeanVA saidDoing a scholar.google.com search on BCAAs, I found several studies that backed up the study done by Weider Fitness and The College of Charleston. I only found one study that disagreed on intra-workout supplementation (and one that disagreed but only in relation to benefiting high altitude skiers).

    For intra-workout BCAA ingestion:

    http://jn.nutrition.org/content/134/6/1583S.short

    http://www.springerlink.com/content/lv6t834653241120/

    Leucine-enriched essential amino acid supplementation during moderate steady state exercise enhances postexercise muscle protein synthesis.:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21775557

    Against intra-workout BCAA ingestion:

    http://ajpendo.physiology.org/content/281/2/E365.short*

    *Study was still in favor of BCAA supplementation but found that it was beneficial post workout as opposed to intra-workout.

    There were also too many studies that found beneficial evidence of BCAA supplementation (that did not focus on intra-workout ingestion) to link to.

    Above are links to actual studies... not the blog of a "YouTube fitness expert" like Scooby.



    I didn't point to Scooby's website because he's a pro. I pointed to him because his point is valid and irrefutable. If you don't like him, that's your problem.

    You also just showed everyone that there isn't solid research supporting the use of BCAAs. Therefore, if you want to waste your money and eat calories during your workout that aren't even being used in that sort of exercise for something that may or may not work according to the research, something you would know had you gone to school, then fine, eat your BCAAs.
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    Feb 17, 2012 6:59 PM GMT
    bluey2223 said

    I didn't point to Scooby's website because he's a pro. I pointed to him because his point is valid and irrefutable. If you don't like him, that's your problem.

    You also just showed everyone that there isn't solid research supporting the use of BCAAs. Therefore, if you want to waste your money and eat calories during your workout that aren't even being used in that sort of exercise for something that may or may not work according to the research, something you would know had you gone to school, then fine, eat your BCAAs.


    How does showing research that supports BCAA supplementation "[show] everyone that there isn't solid research supporting the use of BCAAs"?

    And FYI, the term is layperson or layman... saying "lay audience" is incorrect. If anything the word then be laity. But you is soooo smarts causes yousss knowsss stuffs! icon_rolleyes.gif

    God, some people are just so steadfast in the urge to sound like such an expert they end up coming off as an ass.

    "something you would know had you gone to school, then fine, eat your BCAAs"

    You don't know anything about my academics, so I don't understand where you are getting this attitude from.

    Again. You are going the ad hominem route... but I guess if you want to continue to come off as an arrogant prick... then by all means keep at it when countered with actual facts.
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    Feb 17, 2012 7:12 PM GMT
    aworknprogress saidWhen should I be eating a protein bar or any snack higher in protein? Before or after my workouts?
    Question on this - does anyone use the protein bars and swear by them? I have never really seen a protein bar with an ingedient list that I felt comfortable eating.

    I drink an isolate powder immediately after my workout - but only because food is not readily available within an hour of the end of the workout by virtue of my schedule. (If it was I would skip the powder too, but that's just me.)
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    Feb 17, 2012 7:16 PM GMT
    LeanVA said
    bluey2223 said

    I didn't point to Scooby's website because he's a pro. I pointed to him because his point is valid and irrefutable. If you don't like him, that's your problem.

    You also just showed everyone that there isn't solid research supporting the use of BCAAs. Therefore, if you want to waste your money and eat calories during your workout that aren't even being used in that sort of exercise for something that may or may not work according to the research, something you would know had you gone to school, then fine, eat your BCAAs.


    How does showing research that supports BCAA supplementation "[show] everyone that there isn't solid research supporting the use of BCAAs"?

    And FYI, the term is layperson or layman... saying "lay audience" is incorrect. If anything the word then be laity. But you is soooo smarts causes yousss knowsss stuffs! icon_rolleyes.gif

    God, some people are just so steadfast in the urge to sound like such an expert they end up coming off as an ass.

    "something you would know had you gone to school, then fine, eat your BCAAs"

    You don't know anything about my academics, so I don't understand where you are getting this attitude from.

    Again. You are going the ad hominem route... but I guess if you want to continue to come off as an arrogant prick... then by all means keep at it when countered with actual facts.


    What facts? BCAAs aren't something that researchers recommend people take. That's the take home message. You found studies that support it. There are more that show no benefit. So there, bitch.
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    Feb 17, 2012 7:32 PM GMT
    bluey2223 saidWhat facts? BCAAs aren't something that researchers recommend people take. That's the take home message. You found studies that support it. There are more that show no benefit. So there, bitch.


    If you read the studies I linked to or actually did the scholar.google.com search for "bcaa supplementation" the results disagree with you.

    Plus, I heard BCAAs regrow hair. So there, bitch.