A380 fleet to be checked for wing cracks

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    Feb 10, 2012 1:57 AM GMT
    Kinda frightening on a new fleet.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/industry/9068644/A380-fleet-to-be-checked-for-wing-cracks.html

    The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) said on Thursday night it was "working closely" with manufacturer Airbus to ensure the "safe operations" of the A380 and that a long-term fix should be revealed by the summer.

    However, Australian airline Qantas has grounded one of its A380s for a week. It found 36 hairline cracks on the aircraft after it travelled through heavy turbulence.

    Airbus, the manufacturer of the plane, insists the A380 is still safe to fly and has issued airlines with instructions of how to repair the fault.

    The wings for the A380 are made at the company's British factory in Broughton, Wales.
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    Feb 10, 2012 4:54 AM GMT
    This is what happens when government over subsidizes an industry. They are no longer accountable. The stupid plane was designed too large to even land on a standard runway!
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    Feb 10, 2012 9:20 AM GMT
    It's pretty normal in brand new anything for minor problems to occur. Planes undergo years of testing but this kind of problem takes even longer to develop - which means it can never be fully tested for. It's not a bad problem so long as the airline checks for it and fixes it. But dont stress: even if it did crash, there are worse ways to go.
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    Feb 10, 2012 9:46 AM GMT
    jzee saidIt's pretty normal in brand new anything for minor problems to occur. Planes undergo years of testing but this kind of problem takes even longer to develop - which means it can never be fully tested for. It's not a bad problem so long as the airline checks for it and fixes it. But dont stress: even if it did crash, there are worse ways to go.



    This!

    EVERY single Aircraft in the world develops problems at some stage, its the consequence of a human engineered product! PLENTY of boeing planes also have cracks in them too.... at least the Airlines Operating the A380 has enough audacity to ground the flight and thoroughly check the plane rather than just "tempt fate" if there was any doubt that A380's were unsafe to fly each country's Aviation Authority would ban them from being used!
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    Feb 10, 2012 2:33 PM GMT
    riddler78 saidKinda frightening on a new fleet.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/industry/9068644/A380-fleet-to-be-checked-for-wing-cracks.html

    The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) said on Thursday night it was "working closely" with manufacturer Airbus to ensure the "safe operations" of the A380 and that a long-term fix should be revealed by the summer.

    However, Australian airline Qantas has grounded one of its A380s for a week. It found 36 hairline cracks on the aircraft after it travelled through heavy turbulence.

    Airbus, the manufacturer of the plane, insists the A380 is still safe to fly and has issued airlines with instructions of how to repair the fault.

    The wings for the A380 are made at the company's British factory in Broughton, Wales.
    Dont get in ANY airplane.. if you have issues with 'tiny' cracks.. the entire flying fleet of 100 percent of aircraft flying around this planet has "tiny cracks".. stop drilling is the method to stop the travel..

    Riddler, just walk, ok? And quit being RJs chicken little.
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    Feb 10, 2012 8:00 PM GMT
    There's something called AD's (Airworthiness Directives) that are issued as needed for all airplanes. This is just something that called for the A380's first AD...not too bad for a brand new plane.
  • NerdLifter

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    Feb 10, 2012 8:05 PM GMT
    Not talking specifically about the A380, but about planes in general.

    If you think most planes do not have hairline cracks throughout their infrastructure and that they are checking planes for structural defects before each takeoff, you are a naive fool. And I'm talking to general people who use passenger planes; these things really are not perfect machines, but we take a statistical risk when we board one. Just be smart and attentive and do not put blind faith in the staff.

    You know who checks planes? The ground personnel--none of whom are engineers--who take out a flashlight and looking for gaping holes in the aircraft. They also look for noticeable cracks; you know what they do when they see one? They drill a hole on each end of the crack to blunt it and stop it from propagating (fracture mechanics). Yes, they DRILL holes into the wing. Next time you are on a plane, try to look out on the wing and count how many holes you see drilled into it.

    Actual structural checks would require you take them to a specialized hanger with equipment that can check for problems in the plane's infrastructure. If that was required, each plane trip would cost insanely more and take days of inspection.

    We fly in this stuff all the time.

    So, next time you fly in a plane, and see a crack that is worrisome, point it out, cause many plane disasters have happened because people think "oh, the aircraft people know what they are doing, it must be ok."
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    Feb 10, 2012 8:15 PM GMT
    anyone who doesn't understand the concept of early production issues, look up the De Havilland Comet

    It quite famously would tear itself apart due to higher stress levels at the corners of its unusual square windows. Once this and a few other design issues were addressed the Comet and Comet 2, 3, and 4 went on to enjoy fairly successful careers in commercial aviation.
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    Feb 10, 2012 8:34 PM GMT
    The production issues on the A380 are not exactly news given how long it was delayed. What is surprising is that this was just after one flight on a *new* plane:

    "However, Australian airline Qantas has grounded one of its A380s for a week. It found 36 hairline cracks on the aircraft after it travelled through heavy turbulence."
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    Feb 10, 2012 8:42 PM GMT
    riddler78 saidThe production issues on the A380 are not exactly news given how long it was delayed. What is surprising is that this was just after one flight on a *new* plane:

    "However, Australian airline Qantas has grounded one of its A380s for a week. It found 36 hairline cracks on the aircraft after it travelled through heavy turbulence."
    The bulk of the 69 currently flying have been in service from 2 to 5 yrs!

    only 2 have been delivered in 2012.......................

    Oh the sky is falling, chicken riddler!
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    Feb 10, 2012 8:44 PM GMT
    The Airbus sucks anyway. What an uncomfortable bucket of bolts.
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    Mar 18, 2012 10:17 PM GMT
    An update. Not sure how those like TropicalMark can be so cavalier and dismissive on issues that have yet to be resolved but it would explain many things about his posts.

    Of course, this is a bit of a win for Boeing as these cracks are appearing on all of the new Airbus planes with regulators concluding that "the cracks could compromise the aircraft’s structural integrity".

    http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/f4e6a98a-687c-11e1-a6cc-00144feabdc0.html

    Airbus has suffered acute embarrassment and angered some of its customers following the discovery of two types of cracks on a L-shaped bracket that connects the A380 wing skin to its internal structure.

    Regulators last month ordered airlines to carry out inspections of all A380s once they have completed 1,300 flights after concluding the cracks could compromise the aircraft’s structural integrity.

    Like Airbus, Mr Clark said the A380 was safe to fly, but added: “From a commercial point of view, it’s a dreadful experience. It has caused a lot of commercial hardship and we are not very happy with the way this has gone.”

    Emirates has found wing cracks on the 10 A380s that have been inspected so far, and Mr Clark said it was likely that all 21 would need remedial work.

    He criticised Airbus’ handling of the wing cracking issue, accusing the company of initially being in a state of “denial” about the scale of the problem, although he accepted the company was now seeking to rectify the situation.