Calories in vs calories out?

  • Artesin

    Posts: 482

    Feb 18, 2012 4:40 AM GMT
    The short of it is Im working at starbucks for the winter at a resort which gives me a lot of easy access to free high calorie foods. Bottom line I make a lot of drinks out of half and half and sometime add cream to up the calorie count. Since I tend to hgave trouble packing on the lbs due to a high metabolism could this be a decent strategy? Aside from this I have a good well rounded, high protein vegetarian diet and aim for 3k a day. Ultimately with such a high fat intake what could be the general result be?
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    Feb 18, 2012 5:13 PM GMT
    A dietician will tell you that a calorie is a calorie is a calorie. Bottom line is if you're trying to gain weight then calories in>calories out. However, be aware of things like high cholesterol, clogged arteries, etc. from to much saturated fat.
  • kevjo

    Posts: 38

    Feb 18, 2012 5:21 PM GMT
    With regards to calories, let's say you should be taking in 3000 calories a day to build muscle. Is that before or after you factor in calories burned due to regular day to day living and physical activity?
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    Feb 18, 2012 6:01 PM GMT
    Well, neither, exactly. What you need to do is figure out how many calories it takes for you to maintain your body weight given your level of activity, then add or subtract as necessary. Your maintenance amount varies from individual to individual depending on, among other things, your age and amount of muscle mass you carry as well as amount and type of exercise.
    For instance, at this time of year, it takes me about 2800 cals/day just to maintain my weight. Since I'm trying to gain mass I add about 500 cal/day on top of that. Much more than that and I start adding fat to fast.
    Due to my job, in the spring and summer my activity level increases and as I like to get more cut up in the summer(who doesn't!), I drop my cal intake and it all works out.
    Now, having said that a calorie is a calorie...etc, I find that it makes a difference what I eat and when.
    Bear in mind what works for me may or may not work for you. Everybody is different.
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    Feb 18, 2012 6:05 PM GMT
    Sungod17 saidWell, neither, exactly. What you need to do is figure out how many calories it takes for you to maintain your body weight given your level of activity, then add or subtract as necessary. Your maintenance amount varies from individual to individual depending on, among other things, your age and amount of muscle mass you carry as well as amount and type of exercise.
    For instance, at this time of year, it takes me about 2800 cals/day just to maintain my weight. Since I'm trying to gain mass I add about 500 cal/day on top of that. Much more than that and I start adding fat to fast.
    Due to my job, in the spring and summer my activity level increases and as I like to get more cut up in the summer(who doesn't!), I drop my cal intake and it all works out.
    Now, having said that a calorie is a calorie...etc, I find that it makes a difference what I eat and when.
    Bear in mind what works for me may or may not work for you. Everybody is different.


    Congrats on being one of the very small handful of people on RJ that talk sense in the fitness forums. So rare and so wonderful to see.
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    Feb 18, 2012 6:30 PM GMT
    I don't agree with the idea that calories are made equal. "Calories are calories" -- not really.

    It's one thing eating a 100Kcal candy, it's a whole different deal to consume a 100Kcal portion of casein that will be slowly released for up to 7 hours. Fats, protein, simple carbs, complex carbs, fiber... you might have portions of equal calories of each, but they will not have the same effect on your body. Nutrition is more complicated than you think, which is why it's useful to have the help of a specialized professional.

    I doubt there's anything of nutritional value where you work. Go to a sports nutritionist, have a diet made for you, buy decent food and bring it to your workplace.
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    Feb 18, 2012 6:39 PM GMT
    bachian saidI don't agree with the idea that calories are made equal. "Calories are calories" -- not really.

    It's one thing eating a 100Kcal candy, it's a whole different deal to consume a 100Kcal portion of casein that will be slowly released for up to 7 hours. Fats, protein, simple carbs, complex carbs, fiber... you might have portions of equal calories of each, but they will not have the same effect on your body. Nutrition is more complicated than you think, which is why it's useful to have the help of a specialized professional.

    I doubt there's anything of nutritional value where you work. Go to a sports nutritionist, have a diet made for you, buy decent food and bring it to your workplace.


    I agree. That's why I said it makes a difference what you eat and when. 300 grams of boneless, skinless chicken breast(roasted) and 200 grams of steamed broccoli- my usual dinner- provide much more nutrition than a pint of Ben & Jerry's Phish Food, though the caloric content is about the same.
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    Feb 18, 2012 8:32 PM GMT
    I oopsed- my chicken and broc=about 1/2 pint of B&J. The point remains however.
  • Artesin

    Posts: 482

    Feb 19, 2012 3:28 AM GMT
    Nutritional value isnt really of any concern, my diet in general is near immaculate, but on a vegetarian diet its complicated to get 4k calories a day without going broke and without being chained to the kitchen. I was more interested in the idea of using high levels of fat and a moderate amount of protein to pad that count and get a running start out of the gate while finding out what some of the drawbacks could be. Which I doubt there really are any, considering its impossible for me to gain weight regardless of the circumstance.
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    Feb 19, 2012 7:13 AM GMT
    Artesin saidNutritional value isnt really of any concern, my diet in general is near immaculate, but on a vegetarian diet its complicated to get 4k calories a day without going broke and without being chained to the kitchen. I was more interested in the idea of using high levels of fat and a moderate amount of protein to pad that count and get a running start out of the gate while finding out what some of the drawbacks could be. Which I doubt there really are any, considering its impossible for me to gain weight regardless of the circumstance.

    Well it's a yes with a but.

    Yes you can "pad out" your calorie count with fat if that is your last option.

    BUT

    It would be preferable to use another form of calories.

    If you can maintain your weight at what it is while doing everything in the day that you do including working out, then that's awesome right there.
    IF you want to increase your weight then you can eat any old thing and you will gain weight BUT if you are working out HARD and you give your body the things it needs to repair and build muscle (which I'm assuming you want) then find a cheap bulking shake and have that instead since it will provide your body with extra calories AND extra protein which your body will need.

    and now for a however.

    You could also buy a cheap tub of whey protein, mix it with milk, throw in a banana, some honey, a bit of peanut butter and stuff, it will increase your protein intake, your nutrient intake AND your calorie intake.
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    Feb 19, 2012 9:02 AM GMT
    Or just add some healthy fats. I sometimes put a tbsp of olive oil in my shakes to add calories. It all depends on how your body processes the nutrients. Personally, I have to really watch my carb intake more than anything else.