KICKBOXING VS TAEKWONDO

  • biagra

    Posts: 9

    Feb 18, 2012 1:21 PM GMT
    Hi Guys

    I've decide to take up martial arts and have narrowed it down to Kickboxing/Taekwondo.. Which one should i choose..?/Better for defence

    I would like to hear back from guys who do both sports or another martial arts style.,


    Thanks

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  • sevencloud

    Posts: 96

    Feb 18, 2012 2:17 PM GMT
    Why not just do both? If you realize you don't like one, then just drop it and keep doing the one you like.

    I'm usually doing three styles at any given time. Or sometimes just two and then switch back and forth.

    Though my views on martial arts are skewed because its my body and I do what I want.

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    Feb 18, 2012 2:31 PM GMT
    It's going to depend on what your goals are. Are you looking to make belts quickly? Participate in tournaments? Get a good workout?

    Both of those styles have their respective pros and cons, so it ultimately rests on your own personal agenda. I practice Shotokan, and that works well for me, my body type, and my innate skillset.
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    Feb 18, 2012 6:23 PM GMT
    Krav maga is much better.

    It's used by the majority of professional MMA fighters.
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    Feb 18, 2012 6:51 PM GMT
    It all depends on your instructor, try both and pick from there. Most places have a trial period
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    Feb 25, 2012 8:01 AM GMT
    I currently am a yellow belt studying Tae-Kwon Do. Though I agree with the others that you should study both if you can. You would gain more from two rather than one, and also could compare them. And if one isn't for you, you could just drop that one and stick with the other.
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    Apr 14, 2012 4:16 PM GMT

    I'm 5th Dan in TKD and Ive sparred with kick boxers. They are two different martial arts... I love TKD but kickboxing is good at very strong low kicks and in close with fighting... TKD is great overall for kicking and close punches... But most TKD schools like mine teach punches and elbows not just for competitive TKD but self defense as wellicon_biggrin.gif
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    Apr 14, 2012 4:20 PM GMT
    for defence Krav maga
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    Apr 15, 2012 10:48 AM GMT
    biagra saidHi Guys

    I've decide to take up martial arts and have narrowed it down to Kickboxing/Taekwondo.. Which one should i choose..?/Better for defence

    I would like to hear back from guys who do both sports or another martial arts style.,


    Thanks

    BiagraCOLORED TEXT GOES HERECOLORED TEXT GOES HEREicon_wink.gif


    Do Both. Do as many styles that cater to your needs.
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    Jul 06, 2012 8:31 AM GMT
    Kickboxing is simpler and more effective.
  • bad_wolf

    Posts: 1002

    Jul 06, 2012 8:48 AM GMT
    Taekwondo

    I found kick boxing to be basic and focuses more on fitness. For martial arts I found TKD was more technique and skill based. Depends what you're after.
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    Jul 16, 2012 4:58 AM GMT
    For fitness both are great, and they're both great arts in general.

    For self-defense, maybe kickboxing, but it depends on the instructors and the curriculum like others have said.

    Newho, the reason I'm saying no to TKD has to do with my experience of TKD's training methods and purpose. In my view it's mostly viewed as a sport and you're trained with that in mind. A lot of drills, a lot of striking the bag, and strikes that are meant to fit into TKD's rules. Even the self-defense drills I've seen in TKD seem somewhat separated from reality (i.e. no low kicks, emphasis on points, "tagging" the opponent, etc.). Again, not talking smack, this is just my observation.


    In all, I think of the kicking arts, the best for self-defense is Muay Thai. It is more practical and it is trained a little more realistically because even though it is ALSO a competition art, like TKD, Muay Thai competitions include a lot more contact and are more "realistic"-ally applied if that makes any sense.

    If not Muay Thai, then kickboxing is better as self-defense.

    Good luck though. Sometimes this decision is very personal, and again, I'm speaking in generalities. TKD, applied well, can be devastating. And it comes from Hwarangdo which IS focused on self-defense, and which is absolutely destructive (and broad).

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    Jul 17, 2012 4:46 AM GMT


    As experienced Taekwondo Practitioner, I can say that a good TKD school not only should emphasize great technique, but the ability to spar and be able to teach "SELF DEFENSE" to help round out a good korean style martial artist. With little to no argument, TKD and Kickboxing are not to far from one another in terms of a sport aspect, both arts have rules, both arts have competitive events, both arts excel in kicking for points or knock out. In real world application TKD can be very damaging in many ways, but can be limited. However most martial arts are limited to certain application self defense or otherwise. As a TKD Black Belt I have learned to incorporate certain techniques from other arts such as wing-chung, Judo, and my ranking in Hapkido to make me a full rounded martial artist.

    In all respect, Kickboxing has it's attributes and so does Taekwondo. It's just dependent on the play style you will appreciate in the long run. icon_biggrin.gif
  • sybiko

    Posts: 26

    Jul 27, 2012 2:53 AM GMT
    As a 1st dan in chang hon ryu Tae kwondo, I am going to sound a little biased. Although, like previously mentioned, it all depends on what you want out of your training. In both Tae kwondo and Kickboxing (like all martial arts), there are good schools and bad schools.

    Now, what you determine as "good" or "bad" all depends on what your goals are. As in, there's not much point in joining a school where lessons are more focused on fitness, if you're aiming to acquire self-defence skills, and vice versa.

    I do however agree, that since becoming an Olympic sport, Tae kwondo has "softened". Now, this all depends on if you do WTF (South Korean government/Kukkiwon approved) (the style seen on the Olympics, and the more popular version in the US)
    Or if you do ITF style ("founded" by General major Choi hong hii 9th degree blackbelt).

    The WTF style is more sport orientated, whilst ITF is more "traditional". As a ITF -based - but not affiliated Jeja (taekwondo student), I can't say what does/doesn't go on in a WTF school.

    There are bound to be good WTF Sabumnims out there who teach practical taekwondo, as well as the "Mc-dojo" type people, readily available at a strip-mall near you. Avoid those people!

    I admire the way in which Muay Thai is trained, as it is less "safety concious" compared to modern day TKD.

    It's funny, cos in reality, within the ITF (chang hon) patterns (hyungs/tuls/forms/kata) low kicking, throwing, chocking, gouging, maiming, scratching/clawing is all part of the applications.

    Though, I think that's where TKD is let down (in my personal opinion). Not enough emphasis is placed on contact work, like how you'd do "sticky hands" in wing tsun and things.

    TKD is a bit of a pioneer martial art, as it mixed General Choi's experience in Shotokan (he got to 2nd dan I think, correct me if I am wrong) with Taekkyon, Su bahk, Kwon bop and a little Hapkido. It's a shame that people forget it was a art that was feared in the vietcong for being lethal and brutal.

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    Jul 27, 2012 2:55 AM GMT
    WTF TKD FTW!!! icon_biggrin.gif
  • BlackBeltGuy

    Posts: 2609

    Jul 27, 2012 2:58 AM GMT
    study a Chinese style. they are supreme IMO
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    Jul 27, 2012 2:59 AM GMT
    I did TKD growing up but it has a heavy emphasis on kicks and neglects punching. Kickboxing has more an emphasis on punching but incorporates some roundhouses (no sidekicks). So there are drawbacks to both. KB is usually geared more towards fitness, while TKD is considered more of an art form. TKD did put me in the best shape of my life, though I was lean and athletic rather than huge.

    TKD is great but it's hard to find a good teacher and dojo (too many McDojos for little kids), which is why I started doing MMA, BJJ, and muay thai. I also want to try boxing and krav maga.

    To each his own.
  • sybiko

    Posts: 26

    Jul 27, 2012 3:02 AM GMT
    If there are any ITF jejas reading this, and you are into practical applications to the Chang hon patterns (Chon-ji, Dan-gun, Do-san etc) I recommend the book:

    Ch'ang hon TaeKwondo Hae sul: Real applications to the ITF patterns

    (2 volumes available, vol 1 - Saju Jirugi through to Toi -Gye, and vol 2 - Hwa-rang through to Juche)

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Chang-Hon-Taekwon-do-Hae-Sul/dp/1906628041
  • sybiko

    Posts: 26

    Jul 27, 2012 3:04 AM GMT
    active_athlete saidI did TKD growing up but it has a heavy emphasis on kicks and neglects punching. Kickboxing has more an emphasis on punching but incorporates some roundhouses (no sidekicks). So there are drawbacks to both. KB is usually geared more towards fitness, while TKD is considered more of an art form. TKD did put me in the best shape of my life, though I was lean and athletic rather than huge.

    TKD is great but it's hard to find a good teacher and dojo (too many McDojos for little kids), which is why I started doing MMA, BJJ, and muay thai. I also want to try boxing and krav maga.

    To each his own.



    What style did you train in? WTF? or ITF?
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    Jul 27, 2012 3:07 AM GMT
    I think it was ITF?
  • sybiko

    Posts: 26

    Jul 27, 2012 3:14 AM GMT
    active_athlete saidI think it was ITF?


    Hmmm, I don't know what the TKD scene is like in the US (as I live in the UK), but where I train, If anything, we work harder on your hand techniques, because we know that people don't expect a TKD fighter to be any good with their hands. It's funny though, as there are only like 30 or something kicks in TKD, and atleast 150 (or more) hand techniques (I'm including, finger, elbow and forearms as sangbansin/hand parts)
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    Jul 27, 2012 3:24 AM GMT
    That sounds awesome, Sybiko! I learned from Master Payne in San Antonio and he was great but there was definitely an overemphasis on legwork. We did some punching and blocks of course but I had no clue how weak my upper body was until I started doing kickboxing. Then when I had to move, I found the TKD places to be seriously lacking in all aspects (intensity, technique, conditioning, adequate sparring partners, etc.)

    I wish I could go to your dojo in the UK. The vast majority of TKD places in the US are not worth anyone's time or money. I've visited a lot of places and decided to just try other types of martial arts. I've also done Shotokan Karate and some Hung Gar Kungfu. I also really like Filipino knife fighting and kali stick fighting.
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    Jul 27, 2012 3:25 AM GMT
    I'm a Green Belt at my MMA Dojo and our Sensais are awesome at incorporating many styles. The Kickboxing is done on separate days from the other styles but we still mix it up when sparring.

    When you start, it's gonna come down to the instructors, no matter what style you're participating in. If he or she can keep you interested and enthusiastic while you face the early aches and pains (you are gonna get hit and you are gonna hurt) then they'll play a big roll as you advance though your belt levels.

    good luck