Quitting Smoking - What Worked For You ?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 23, 2012 8:27 PM GMT
    I don't expect many responses on such a health conscious site but any former smokers on here, tell me, how did you finally manage to kick the cancer sticks ?

    Also please describe the experience of quitting, was it utter hell or a breeze ?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 23, 2012 10:35 PM GMT
    I quit fifteen years ago. I just got up one day and quit. It was easy once my mind was made up, I never looked back. As for the experience, it was a process. I quit hanging around people who smoked and changed some of my daily habits. No more smoking after meals, no more smoking while watching tv, etc.. It bothered me for about three weeks, and then everything was better. I didn't stink like smoke anymore, my house and car didn't stink, I slept better. Throw away your ash trays.

    You can do it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 23, 2012 10:48 PM GMT
    Cold turkey. I found it was way easier than I thought it would be. The hardest part is saying "This is my last cigarette." Once I committed, I found it to be much easier. I got used to not going out for a smoke on my breaks very fast. The worst cravings for me were at night, after dinner. So I'd take really nice dark chocolate, and just suck on a square. Usually I'd have a few squares total, sometimes more. I found that not biting into it, letting it slowly melt, definitely helped with the oral fixation and the "act" of doing something after I ate. I also read that chocolate causes the release of similar chemicals in the brain as nicotine. So that was how I got through it! Good luck!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 24, 2012 12:19 AM GMT
    yourname2000 saidYou need to get yourself a whole bunch of kittens...
    Basket-of-Kittens.jpg
    ...then, when an urge strikes you that you simply can't shake, pick one of the kittens, hold it in your hands and squeeze the living shit out of it! --squeeze it 'til it's oozing out from between your fingers, until you can't squeeze any harder or any more...just squeeze all of your frustration away. Works like a charm.

    And if you're squeamish, I hear you can use nerf balls instead....just pretend they're kittens. icon_biggrin.gif

    Congrats, btw!



    Haha wtf????
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 24, 2012 12:25 AM GMT
    Smoked for 8 and a half years or so a pack and a half a day just about.

    As sad as this is because when i was on them the first couple of days / first week i wanted to literally roll them up and smoke them..

    First couple of times i tried quitting I chewed, that was nasty, went back to smoking, tried gum that was gross went back to smoking again...

    Finally i tried Lots of gum and nicotene patches worked for me. While i got used to the patches and the doses i was getting.. the gum helped with my oral fixation (no i wasn't dating at the time so i uh.. didn't have any other vices for that)...

    Lots of will power too, you'll be amazed after the 3rd week how much will power you have. Yes, even after 5 years of being smoke free i still have cravings every now and again. But no way in hell am i going back to smoking.

    Good luck!
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    Feb 24, 2012 12:31 AM GMT
    I was very lucky. Well, sort of...

    Got very sick with a flu-like thing that lingered for more than three weeks. I simply did not want anything to do with a cigarette. Then, as it passed, I decided to not start again. It worked. Haven't smoked for decades.

    About 20 years ago I got some reinforcement from a nice case of cancer. Since that and another case of same, I consider myself safe from the blandishments of tobacco.

    Some of techniques can be helpful:

    Every time you want a smoke, remind yourself how expensive it is. Some people set up a piggy bank and set aside an amount equal to what they spend on smokes, lighters, etc. Check it out after a couple of months.

    It can be very messy. Remind yourself every time you light up of how bad it smells and how ashes and ashtrays and clothes cleaning are a pain.

    Every time you get the urge, or light up, tell yourself "I do NOT want to do this. It is bad for me." Seems a little silly, but it helps.

    Take away the cues. Put your cigs or pipe or whatever away far from your normal relaxing area so that you have to make an effort to use them. This will help to prevent smoking just from habit. Combining this with a thorough cleaning of the area is also good.

    Whatever you do, kick the habit. You will be healthier in lots of ways and happier in the long run. Good luck!
  • rnch

    Posts: 11524

    Feb 24, 2012 12:31 AM GMT
    ummmm.....never started.


    icon_idea.gif
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Feb 24, 2012 12:34 AM GMT
    My husband used the patch when he quit. He bought extra of the final step and cut those in half to help wean himself down.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 24, 2012 12:42 AM GMT
    I was a smoker for ten years. Then one day I just decided I was done with that shit. After having chest pains at 20, I felt it's got to stop. Now.
    And it was not hard AT ALL. I havent wanted a cigarette since then, even tried and didn't like it anymore.

    But the key to success is this:
    YOU HAVE TO MAKE UP YOUR MIND

    If you 'quit' smoking while you still WANT to smoke you are never gonna make it. And i dont mean 'want' as in you would like to have a cigarette now, but actually WANT to keep on being a smoker. For how long? Once you have made the REAL decision to quit, your days of being a smoker will be long gone from that second on.
    So really go over all pro's (there are NONE btw) and con's, and then make a firm decision and stick by it. It's hardest in the beginning, but then 'it gets better' hehe ;)

    Good luck mate!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 24, 2012 12:58 AM GMT
    yourname2000 saidYou need to get yourself a whole bunch of kittens...
    Basket-of-Kittens.jpg
    ...then, when an urge strikes you that you simply can't shake, pick one of the kittens, hold it in your hands and squeeze the living shit out of it! --squeeze it 'til it's oozing out from between your fingers, until you can't squeeze any harder or any more...just squeeze all of your frustration away. Works like a charm.

    And if you're squeamish, I hear you can use nerf balls instead....just pretend they're kittens. icon_biggrin.gif

    Congrats, btw!


    Brilliant!
  • bishop65

    Posts: 226

    Feb 24, 2012 1:10 AM GMT
    I quit cold turkey. To be honest it was a bit of a challenge since smoking a cigarette was my way of dealing with stress. Once I made the decision to stop, I set a date and did it. Some tips:

    1. tell as many people as possible. this keeps you accountable and if someone sees you smoking, they can either stop you or shame you.
    2. chew gum and eat mints. do not eat the sugarless stuff. the calories from the sugar won't matter since you are quitting.
    3. relax your eating habits a bit. I ate junk food when I got stressed. I only did this for a limited time, though, but it helped me get through the first two weeks,
    4. if you are smoking because of stress--hit the gym. lifting was my way of dealing with any craziness that was bothering me.
    5. get rid of any paraphernalia. lighters, ash trays, etc. also, if your friends smoke, don't allow them to smoke in your house... you may even have to avoid them for a while if you think you'll be tempted to ask for a cigarette.
    6. never give up.

    good luck!

    RC
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 24, 2012 1:11 AM GMT
    You have to want to stop.

    I smoked for 20 years. It's the hardest habit I've ever had to break, and I've had many habits over the course of my life. icon_redface.gif

    When you love smoking more than you love yourself and those around you, you're f**ked in the head.

    Sadly, I cannot say that I quit because I wanted to quit. I stopped smoking because my husband wanted me to stop smoking. Dammit, it was rough, and it took months to break the habit.

    Don't beat yourself up for stumbling. The occasional fall is no reason to accept defeat.

    And do you really want to keep giving money to a company that actually knows its poisoning you?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 24, 2012 1:12 AM GMT
    bishop65 saidI quit cold turkey. To be honest it was a bit of a challenge since smoking a cigarette was my way of dealing with stress. Once I made the decision to stop, I set a date and did it. Some tips:

    1. tell as many people as possible. this keeps you accountable and if someone sees you smoking, they can either stop you or shame you.
    2. chew gum and eat mints. do not eat the sugarless stuff. the calories from the sugar won't matter since you are quitting.
    3. relax your eating habits a bit. I ate junk food when I got stressed. I only did this for a limited time, though, but it helped me get through the first two weeks,
    4. if you are smoking because of stress--hit the gym. lifting was my way of dealing with any craziness that was bothering me.
    5. get rid of any paraphernalia. lighters, ash trays, etc. also, if your friends smoke, don't allow them to smoke in your house... you may even have to avoid them for a while if you think you'll be tempted to ask for a cigarette.
    6. never give up.

    good luck!

    RC


    ^
    Great advice!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 24, 2012 4:09 PM GMT
    Thanks so much for the advice/experiences guys ! It's really very helpful and very much appreciated ! x
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 24, 2012 9:31 PM GMT
    I quit by first switching from Marlboro reds to an additive-free brand, like American Spirit. I smoked them for a few weeks and then quit cold turkey.
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Feb 24, 2012 9:33 PM GMT
    i think research has shown that people who are most successful do it cold turkey and just decide one day... whatever that impetus to make them stop all of a sudden, it's the most powerful thing
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 12, 2012 4:19 PM GMT
    I quit after getting sick...think it was bronchitis...helps if your correlate smoking with a sickness icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 12, 2012 4:27 PM GMT
    Such a ignorant statement, but when I smoked I just enjoyed it! I didn't give a damn about what the health ramifications were going to be. I tried buprofene and I tried that Chantix! BEWARE that shit made me a nutcase!!!!!!! Cold turkey is the best way to go but extremely diffcult for me..I was a total bitch for weeks. GOOD LUCK : )
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 12, 2012 4:29 PM GMT
    I used the patch for 8 weeks. It was actually easier than I expected it would be.
  • BlackBeltGuy

    Posts: 2609

    Apr 12, 2012 4:52 PM GMT
    CHANTIX worked for me. you smoke when you take it.

    In 30 day period they say the drug will kick in, I quit on day 9

    here is the kicker:
    I quit when I DID NOT WANT TO
    I only took the drug to see if it would work.
    the only side effect I had were lucid dreaming which when I experienced I wanted to refill the script because it was so technicolor!

    I have not had a desire and will never again smoke ever. Some people cant take chantix, I know close friends that it also kicked their alcoholism and heroin habit.
    the drug and components of it are in trials for the drug dependance.

    I love the stuff. It worked for me and a lot of people I know and I didnt even want to quit.

    funny thing also, I brought it in the to pharmacy and it said refill (2)
    the pharmacist looked at me and laughed and said "you wont be back"
    He also said he never saw anyone refill it

    that is what I would try
    just my opinion. hope.. it helps you are doing the right thing!!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 12, 2012 4:52 PM GMT
    Just stop buying them. Worked for me, after almost 20 years. Either you WANT to smoke, or you don't. Pretty basic.
  • gwuinsf

    Posts: 525

    Apr 12, 2012 5:49 PM GMT
    I agree with most that first and foremost is the mental shift to simply want to give it up.

    I used Nicorette to take the edge off. This was 15 years ago, so I know there are different things available now.
  • Frostbitblue

    Posts: 22

    Apr 12, 2012 5:59 PM GMT
    I used the gum. It was easy. I chewed the gum for about 4 weeks. That was that.
    I used to smoke 2 packs a day. Sometime three on a weekend. Did that for 15 years or so.
    Of course it helped that I was older and not going out and hanging around smokers at bars so much anymore.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 12, 2012 6:17 PM GMT
    I'm near the end of the this go round of quitting. Cold turkey is not for me. Bleeding lungs (yes that happened both times & I wasn't a heavy smoker-less than a pack a day for 15 years) twice told me that. Pills were nothing more than placebos in my body. The only thing that worked for me and is working now is the patch. And working out is an added benefit to kicking this habit.

    What I would suggest is talk to your doctor, have your blood tested to know which may work best for you. And just keep in mind that while some can do it in such a way that the next day they are habit free, that is not the norm. Everyone is different and nicotine affects everyone differently. BUT is can be done!!!

    Good luck!!!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 14, 2012 2:46 PM GMT
    Cold turkey and ran more. Once you realise the more things you can do because of quitting, you don't find you have a dependency on it.

    I don't understand the gum and patches. How did everyone quit before they were introduced? Aren't you substituting one action for another but still getting the addictive hit from the nicotine?