Jeremy Lin: 3 Things to Learn from Racial Controversy

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    Feb 24, 2012 4:32 PM GMT

    New York Knicks breakout star player, Jeremy Lin has become the center of discussion concerning racism in sports and professional athletics. Despite the recent flurry of racial/ethnic slurs there are 3 lessons that can be learned from this incident. Herndon Davis, Host of P.P.E. - Pop, Politics & Entertainment explains.
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    Feb 24, 2012 4:54 PM GMT
    stephen a touched on this a few days ago and killed it. was dead ass on point
  • A_1991

    Posts: 366

    Feb 24, 2012 5:11 PM GMT
    Lin is a beast! I think most of the "racism" is more of jokes playing on stereotypes IMO and not really meant to hurt him since there aren't really that much Asians in the NBA.
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    Feb 24, 2012 6:04 PM GMT
    Lin has major potential and he is a very smart player. His turnover rate is an issue, but he makes up for it with his amazing court vision, uncanny ability to make plays out of nothing, and his unselfishness.
    People need to stop hating and stop hyping him and just let him player basketball icon_smile.gif
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    Feb 24, 2012 6:09 PM GMT
  • hartfan

    Posts: 1037

    Feb 24, 2012 6:12 PM GMT
    Here's something else to learn about Lin:

    JeremyLininBed.jpg
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    Feb 24, 2012 6:40 PM GMT
    The reason he became a sensation had much more to do with the fact he was totally unheralded than with his race. Yao Ming was the #1 pick I believe and he was expected to be dominant. While there was a considerable amount of media attention it didn't meet the level Lin is experiencing, mainly because Yao didn't come out of nowhere.

    I hope Lin keeps improving and helps NY finally have a competitive team.
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    Feb 25, 2012 5:26 AM GMT
    I agree, Sdgman.

    But the comments are bad. "Chink in armor", really? They couldn't come up with a better metaphor. "Some woman is going to get a few inches of pleasure off of his win" (paraphrasing). And the fortune cookie with him coming out of it was awful.

    The guy is a great basketball player, has beautiful lips, and is intelligent. He has really invigorated the sport.
  • HollywoodHist...

    Posts: 403

    Feb 25, 2012 6:31 PM GMT
    It's weird but I've never understood racism. It's just not something that was ever around me when I was growing up. I grew up in a lower middle class neighborhood built in the late 50s - you know those tract homes that all look the same with the large picture windows on the front and the green lawns. Many of the original families are still living in the same homes. I grew up in my maternal grandparents house that they purchased in 1959 and my paternal grandparents still live around the corner in the house they bought in 1960.

    In the early days I think all of the families were most likely white, but by the time I was growing up there in the late 80s my neighborhood friends were diverse. They were black, Thai, Filippino, middle eastern, Indian, latin, etc, etc. I really didn't see the difference between me and them. Race, or I should say racial differences, were never discussed - just a non issue. No one thought less of anyone else and no one thought more of themselves. I knew my friends had skin that was a different color, some of their facial features may have been different or the texture of their hair - but to me they were just like different flavors of ice cream - I loved them all. I can only hope that one day the rest of the world will catch up to that great little neighborhood I grew up in.