Does Chlorine effect your skin?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 27, 2012 11:48 PM GMT
    I get extremely dry skin from both chlorine & hard water
    specially in the winter.
    What do you do for your skin between workouts.
    So far Vaseline intensive care for dry & damage skin seems to work.
    Any other tips would be appreciated.
    What does Palmer's "Oil Skin Treatment" do?
  • Generaleclect...

    Posts: 504

    Feb 28, 2012 6:41 AM GMT
    Absolutely it does, and that's why I avoid pools - my eczema will flare up something crazy. Vaseline all the way.

    Anything Palmer's is pretty good. This one sounds like it just has a lot of different oils in it, which is fine if you don't mind being a little greasy.
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    Feb 28, 2012 6:47 AM GMT
    If you can, see if any pools in your area treat with ozone and/or UV. This reduces the amount of chlorine that they need to add to a tiny fraction of what it would be otherwise.
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    Feb 28, 2012 10:12 AM GMT
    i swim 5x/week so i use any shampoo w/ conditioner when i shower. then i use aveeno lotion right after. i like aveeno since it dries out real fast since i really hate the feeling for sticky lotion on me.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 28, 2012 12:36 PM GMT
    everything said above.

    plus, repeated exposure to it, as with team swimmers, gets it in the body- it makes a guys cum taste very very bad.
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    Feb 28, 2012 12:44 PM GMT
    czarodziej saideverything said above.

    plus, repeated exposure to it, as with team swimmers, gets it in the body- it makes a guys cum taste very very bad.


    oof, thank god for sea water ROFL
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    Mar 02, 2012 5:55 AM GMT
    My medicine cabinet's pretty bare but I go full on metro when it comes to pre- and post-swim skincare.

    If I could use only one product in my chlorine combat arsenal (which includes the full Triswim product line, http://triswimbeauty.com/products.html) it'd be my preswimming lotion from dermaswim pro (http://www.dermaswimpro.com/), which blocks pores to prevent chlorine from entering. The Triswim products take care of any residual chlorine it may not have blocked. Before I used this product I found that when lifting my sweat reeked of chlorine, but now? Nada.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 04, 2012 6:50 AM GMT
    Been a swimmer my entire life. Never noticed any issues with my skin from the chlorine. It does wreck havoc on my hair though I stopped caring about that 20 years ago? 50 years ago? It never really bothered me though my barber has made mention.

    The only product I ever tried was about 15 years ago, a bottle or two of declorinating shampoo that I saw on the supermarket shelf. But I decided it was bullshit and I got tired of that real quick, Never bothered with any similar product again.
  • tautomer

    Posts: 1010

    Mar 04, 2012 7:15 AM GMT
    Makes it a wee bit dry, but for the most part it does nothing to me. Partly because I work with things farrrrr more nasty then pool chlorine on a daily basis.

    I'll probably start glowing in another year or so icon_razz.gif
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    Mar 08, 2012 5:00 AM GMT
    it just depends on the person--make sure to eat some food good for the skin such as salmon and fish--this will help and moisturize after showering icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 23, 2012 9:58 PM GMT
    I have the same dryness and eczema condition problems probably. I bring a bottle of water mixed with apple cider vinegar to get more crap out of my hair and skin. I forgot what that does but one thing is itching and neutralizes the skin somehow. Then you wash it off of course. Then apply not one, but multiple layers of aveeno oatmeal or similar lotions. One layer will not do. Let dry then apply another layer.
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    Apr 23, 2012 10:01 PM GMT
    intensity69 saidIf you can, see if any pools in your area treat with ozone and/or UV. This reduces the amount of chlorine that they need to add to a tiny fraction of what it would be otherwise.


    You have to be really careful with this as UV and Ozone don't leave a sanitizing residual. Unless there's sufficient chlorine in the water then, for a public pool especially, you run the possibility of problems a lot more serious than dry skin.
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    Apr 23, 2012 10:13 PM GMT
    showme said
    intensity69 saidIf you can, see if any pools in your area treat with ozone and/or UV. This reduces the amount of chlorine that they need to add to a tiny fraction of what it would be otherwise.


    You have to be really careful with this as UV and Ozone don't leave a sanitizing residual. Unless there's sufficient chlorine in the water then, for a public pool especially, you run the possibility of problems a lot more serious than dry skin.


    This is true. Most pools that treat with UV/Ozone still use chlorine, but at reduced levels for precisely the reasons that you allude to.
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    Apr 23, 2012 10:41 PM GMT
    intensity69 said
    showme said
    intensity69 saidIf you can, see if any pools in your area treat with ozone and/or UV. This reduces the amount of chlorine that they need to add to a tiny fraction of what it would be otherwise.


    You have to be really careful with this as UV and Ozone don't leave a sanitizing residual. Unless there's sufficient chlorine in the water then, for a public pool especially, you run the possibility of problems a lot more serious than dry skin.


    This is true. Most pools that treat with UV/Ozone still use chlorine, but at reduced levels for precisely the reasons that you allude to.
    I havent had salt or chlorine in my pool for 6 years.. I use copper!
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    Apr 24, 2012 6:24 PM GMT
    TropicalMark said
    intensity69 said
    showme said
    intensity69 saidIf you can, see if any pools in your area treat with ozone and/or UV. This reduces the amount of chlorine that they need to add to a tiny fraction of what it would be otherwise.


    You have to be really careful with this as UV and Ozone don't leave a sanitizing residual. Unless there's sufficient chlorine in the water then, for a public pool especially, you run the possibility of problems a lot more serious than dry skin.


    This is true. Most pools that treat with UV/Ozone still use chlorine, but at reduced levels for precisely the reasons that you allude to.
    I havent had salt or chlorine in my pool for 6 years.. I use copper!


    Be careful! Copper is primarily an algaecide but is not going to help much with bacteria - you need some chlorine in there, too.

    Good websites on pool maintenance:

    http://www.troublefreepool.com

    http://www.poolforum.com

    (Also, a salt water pool actually DOES have chlorine - the salt water generator converts the salt into chlorine. It's just a much easier way of keeping the chlorine levels consistent than manual dosing.)
  • Syphon

    Posts: 366

    Apr 24, 2012 6:36 PM GMT
    Just moisturize.

    I lifeguard full time and I have to put lotion on my feet every day. In the winter it's everytime I get out of the water otherwise they'll crack so badly. If you moisturize regularily you'll be fine.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 28, 2012 2:50 PM GMT
    I started swimming at age 5, and then playing H20-polo in high school and college. You're in the pools twice a day during the season - for work outs. Chlorine is hard on skin and hair (turns it a little green if you're a blond). My teammates and I experimented with various moisturizers and landed on a few very good ones, including Eucerin; Kiss My Face Ultra Moisturizer; Better Botanicals Kokum Butter Body Balm; Alba Botanica Cocoa Butter Hand & Body Lotion and Pangea Organics Hand & Body Lotion. There are others, but those are what I use to this day, even though I don't swim as much as in my playing days.
  • iiheartwaves

    Posts: 82

    May 03, 2012 5:15 PM GMT
    I agree with everything above, just shower condition and moisturize.
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    Jun 15, 2012 6:19 PM GMT
    not as bad since i joined a new gym. My old swimming pool i was using for a while was way too heavily chlorinated. got dry skin all the time and irritated me 'down there' icon_mad.gif no such problems now though. i just slap on some neutrogena norwegian formula body moisturiser on every now and then and i'm fine
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    Jun 19, 2012 7:15 AM GMT
    I swam competitively for a long time and do remember those cold winter dry skin days. Nothing like that lingering chlorine smell. I would definitely go for concentrated lotions like Neutrogena Norwegian Formula like philk92 mentioned. Also try to get the unscented/no alcohol ones. I found that all those hours in the pool opened your pores and when you slapped on scented lotions it burned like a bitch.
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    Jun 26, 2012 5:26 AM GMT
    I just read that Chorine is alkaline so you need to use a spray of either lemon juice or vinegar to remove the chorine on your skin. I tried it tonight. I poured some white vinegar into a shallow filled tub and rinsed off after coming home from swimming. The smell was gone. And oatmeal aveno after drying off. I think you have to take 2 showers or baths though to get all the smell out. So I take a shower at the gym. Still smell like chlorine but when dry at home I will apply the vinegar and water again. It saves you from paying the high price for Ultraswim or similar. I also read that "food quality" orange oil, or lemon juice can work to hide the chlorine smell too. So probably an acidic citrus soap or product.
  • winwin

    Posts: 264

    Oct 13, 2012 3:31 AM GMT
    I swim a lot too and the chlorine in the pool turns my black hair brown and some strands of hair ends up half black and half brown! Really weird. My skin also gets really dry as well.