Whats the most difficult part of racing?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 05, 2008 10:10 PM GMT
    I just struggled through my third ironman, and I have to admit that it wasn't up to par with my other races. Physically my body was in great form, but i struggled with pain management. In the end, I think I enjoyed this finish more than the rest. I certainly felt tougher at the end, and a root canal the next day did wonders. Whats your best racing/sports story where you overcame personal demons and pain to finish?
  • UStriathlete

    Posts: 320

    Jul 06, 2008 2:45 AM GMT
    for me, it's knowing i'm doing all i can and the best that i can.

    every ironman i've done, fast one's and slow one's. i've always have had some low times. i just relax into them and believe that i will come around. i think what others would do in the situation and see if would work for me or what my coach has told me.

    i also like to read blogs from chrisise wellington, hillary biscay, belinda granger, bella comford and stephan balysis, kate major and michael lavato.
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    Jul 06, 2008 3:03 AM GMT
    I am not a triathlete--I'm a lousy swimmer--so I focus on running, cycling, and the occasional biathlon (run,bike,run). For me the difficult part is the time leading up to the start. The waiting game while you are stretching out and getting mentally focused on what is ahead in the race. Once I make it through the first mile of a race, I settle down and begin working my race strategy and monitoring my pace, breathing, hydration, etc. The first mile is always the toughest for me
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    Jul 06, 2008 1:08 PM GMT
    Yes, the first mile is absolutely a mind-f**k!

    I actually race better if I don't impose any expectations. Expectations/race goals just cluster my mind and create junk in my head.

    I raced a duathlon series while recovering from hemmoriodectomy -- I thought my season was over but I managed to win series overall in my AG. Let me tell ya, racing with sutures up your arse is so much fun. I had to complete the series because I had already registered and do not want to waste the fees. So, I just race with no expectations. A win is always sweet.

    This year -- I barely trained for half-ironman DU due to work and I initially have loafty goals. Needless to say, I downgraded my expectations and just went into the race to just finish under the cut-off time. Guess what -- 2nd in my AG and a miraculous finish time. One mile at a time .... one mile at a time ......

    I have learned in my very young/short participation in endurance sport is that mental toughness is key to success. I am still working on controlling my mental decision making during a race -- sometimes it works and sometimes you just can't simply control it.... you win some and loose some ....

    Correct me if I am wrong -- run/bike/run is duathlon and run/bike is called a biathlon. Corrections?

    Have a great 2008 season, athletes!!!

    Cheers

    A
  • UStriathlete

    Posts: 320

    Jul 06, 2008 3:13 PM GMT
    it's a duathlon in any order. biathlon is the olympic sport or xcc skiing and shooting.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14345

    Jul 07, 2008 6:57 PM GMT
    I just did a duathlon yesterday morning at Evangola State Park on Lake Erie 30 miles SW of Buffalo. It consisted of two 5K runs and a double loop cycling route of 25 miles. The most difficult parts of this duathlon was the one steep hill on NY Route 5 that took forever to climb and the last 5K run. This duathlon was held along with a triathlon, so there were a lot of cyclists and runners on the roads. The real bad thing for me in this duathlon is that one of the cyclists decided to just suddenly stop in the middle of the race course and I was a couple cycle lengths behind her moving at 20 MPH but because of passing traffic, I could not stop my bike fast enough to avoid colliding into her. My bad luck I flew off my bike onto the asphalt and suffered some cuts and scratches. It was like she was expecting everyone to stop on a dime because she lost her water bottle and her fanny pack. Other cyclists saw the accident and asked me if I was allright and yelled at her about what she was thinking. My bike suffered no damage in the accident. I just got up off the pavement and hopped back onto my bike and resumed racing. But that accident screwed up my racing time unfortunately.icon_sad.gif
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    Jul 10, 2008 6:59 AM GMT
    I witnessed a guy have a brutal wreck just a mile or so from the T2 transition. The guy was bleending fiercely, but he limped to the transition. Handed over his bike, and limped the next 26 miles after they wrapped his cuts up.

    thats mental toughness!
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    Aug 15, 2008 1:15 PM GMT
    Honestly, when I feel like I'm bonking I just keep saying over and over - one foot in front of the other, one foot in front of the other.

    And I might be one of the weird ones but it's the hills I pick to dig deep and start passing. I don't know why but that gives me a charge more than anything.

  • Sep 10, 2008 9:42 PM GMT
    n2briefs2 said
    I actually race better if I don't impose any expectations. Expectations/race goals just cluster my mind and create junk in my head.


    I've found this to be my experience as well. I mean...at 49 I don't have any expectations to come in first, but every time I go with the mindset to "beat" someone, or to do "better" than last time, I screw up.

    If I go in just intending to have a good time and enjoy the race, I tend to exceed whatever expectations I may have had.