Fish and Omega-3's - Cooking methods

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    Mar 02, 2012 7:57 AM GMT
    When I cook fish (so far it's primarily been salmon), the baking sheet always has alot of oils that have cooked out of the fish. I usually use very little olive oil to prevent the fish from sticking to the pan, but it's not enough to create the oil spillage that's left behind.

    Does anyone know if these oils are the beneficial oils that provide Omega-3s? Is this depleting a large quantity of the oils from the fish, or is there plenty left in the fish after all is said and done. I've been scooping up the oil and drizzling back onto the fish before I eat it.

    I've searched online and couldn't a thing about it.
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    Mar 02, 2012 8:13 AM GMT
    Thanks! That's a great suggestion.

    My only problem with it is that I like eating my rice dry with only a sprinkling of salt on it. I've eaten it that way for my whole life and have never liked it getting mixed up with sauces and stuff. But I'll give that a try and see if it tastes okay for me.

    Appreciate the response!
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    Mar 02, 2012 11:36 AM GMT
    You could also adapt MuchMoreThanMuscle's suggestion and try roasting the salmon on top of something else. Greens like spinach or chard would collect a lot of the oil. You could parboil them first if you preferred that they have a softer texture.

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    Mar 02, 2012 11:42 AM GMT
    I use the oil by making a sauce with it.. for instance with cream and dill, or mayo, gherkins and capers... it makes the sauce oily, but i dont want to waste fish oil.. the oceans are being depleted enough as it is to waste #green
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    Mar 02, 2012 3:10 PM GMT
    http://www.omega-3-for-your-health.com/salmon-oil.html
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    Mar 02, 2012 3:50 PM GMT
    Salmon drippings vs meat drippings (from cooking)

    You get a good dose of Omega3

    http://skipthepie.org/fats-and-oils/fish-oil-salmon/compared-to/meat-drippings-lard-beef-tallow-mutton-tallow/
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    Mar 02, 2012 3:52 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidThat's a good question and I'm not sure if anyone can provide us with a god response.

    One of the ways I sometimes fix salmon is I lay it over a bed of rice while the rice is still cooking. I tend to do this for roughly the last six minutes or so that the rice cooks. I cover the pot with a lid so that the fish is warmed and cooked. Any of the oils from the fish will seep into the rice or whatever else I'm cooking inside the sauce pan. I don't need to use any extra oil whatsoever. Whatever does leech out of the fish gets absorbed into the rice or other food below and I get to eat it.

    Just an idea. Hope this helps.


    Oh my GOD That sounds sooooooo good!! How does that taste????
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    Mar 02, 2012 5:04 PM GMT
    GreenHopper saidI use the oil by making a sauce with it.. for instance with cream and dill, or mayo, gherkins and capers... it makes the sauce oily, but i dont want to waste fish oil.. the oceans are being depleted enough as it is to waste #green


    That's a great suggestion, too GH. Gotta try that one!
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    Mar 02, 2012 5:05 PM GMT
    meninlove said Salmon drippings vs meat drippings (from cooking)

    You get a good dose of Omega3

    http://skipthepie.org/fats-and-oils/fish-oil-salmon/compared-to/meat-drippings-lard-beef-tallow-mutton-tallow/


    Thanks, MIL. That's great information.
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    Mar 02, 2012 5:06 PM GMT
    Kobaltjak saidYou could also adapt MuchMoreThanMuscle's suggestion and try roasting the salmon on top of something else. Greens like spinach or chard would collect a lot of the oil. You could parboil them first if you preferred that they have a softer texture.



    Great idea, too. I'll have to look up "parboil", though..haha
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    Mar 02, 2012 5:09 PM GMT
    yourname2000 saidYes, it definitely is...salmon is just that oily. I do my best to save and use it all. The salmon oil is typically orange, so it does look different.


    Yes, the drippings are orange-ish in color. I'm actually amazed at how much oil comes out of a small filet.
  • sevencloud

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    Mar 02, 2012 5:57 PM GMT
    EastCoastNAZ said
    Kobaltjak saidYou could also adapt MuchMoreThanMuscle's suggestion and try roasting the salmon on top of something else. Greens like spinach or chard would collect a lot of the oil. You could parboil them first if you preferred that they have a softer texture.



    Great idea, too. I'll have to look up "parboil", though..haha


    It just means to boil something to partially cook it. You can also do things like parbake or parbroil. This makes "harder" vegetables like yams, fennel, potatoes, carrots, etc. cook a bit, then you can move on to cooking it however you want like baking or sauting or grilling. It makes it so that it won't be undercooked and hard in the center but also allows you to give it a really sexy texture and for flavor to penetrate.

    And as we know on realjoke, we love penetration here.
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    Mar 02, 2012 11:21 PM GMT
    EastCoastNAZ said
    meninlove said Salmon drippings vs meat drippings (from cooking)

    You get a good dose of Omega3

    http://skipthepie.org/fats-and-oils/fish-oil-salmon/compared-to/meat-drippings-lard-beef-tallow-mutton-tallow/


    Thanks, MIL. That's great information.



    If you like, try some wild salmon, which produces less oil than farmed when cooked. The wild ones get more exercise, lol.
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    Mar 02, 2012 11:57 PM GMT
    Actually, I was using wild salmon this weekend. We partied it up!!!
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    Mar 03, 2012 12:15 AM GMT
    i love fish
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    Mar 03, 2012 12:30 AM GMT
    BBQ... if the fish is too delicate they have fish baskets. No better way to cook it and you can't beat the flavor. The oils drip out and make it leaner... however... there aren't many "bad" fish oils.

    Get a coleman
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    Mar 03, 2012 5:43 AM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidAnd you didn't think to invite us?!

    I think I speak for all of us when I say how hurt I feel this very moment.


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