Regional bias in hiring?

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    Mar 03, 2012 6:29 AM GMT
    Ok, question first then story to accompany -

    Does anyone feel like the city/region they live in discriminates against 'outsiders' simply because they went to a university or grew up somewhere else? I'm not talking how they dress or act or talk even (though feel free to include that).

    I've been living in Ohio for almost two years now, and cannot seem to land an interview anywhere that might actually use my degree. Now, i know some people will say its the economy, but at this point i can't get an interview with jobs i'm overqualified (or qualified) for. The jobs i have had have all been with businesses owned by 'outsiders'. Is my university or old jobs being from out of state hurting? When i talk to people, they seem to automatically know i'm not from here, and one of the first questions people ask is 'what high school did you go to?' i cant help but think i might need to move, even though i dont have the money anymore.
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    Mar 03, 2012 7:20 AM GMT
    Maybe. At one of my previous jobs, almost all of the top level employees were alumni from the same schools. I guess it's sort of a bias, but I can understand. Personally, if I was launching a company, I'd want people that I know/trust from previous jobs/schools.

    Anyways, just keep trying. You'll eventually find the right job. icon_cool.gif
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    Mar 03, 2012 12:30 PM GMT
    I came to New York with a degree from the University of Oregon and got a job with the second place I interviewed. That was in 1985, for what it's worth.

    There are definitely people out there who automatically gravitate toward candidates with degrees from particular schools based on all kinds of assumptions. I've hired new employees with them and found it really frustrating. But how far away are you from where you grew up? Is your accent so shockingly different?

    I wish I could give you better advice than "be persistent," because you've probably heard that a thousand times before.
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    Mar 03, 2012 2:23 PM GMT
    Ohio’s jobless rate drops, but so does number of jobs
    Ohio’s unemployment rate falls sharply — to 8.1 percent — but fewer people looking for work


    http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/business/2012/01/21/ohios-jobless-rate-drops-but-so-does-number-of-jobs.html
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    Mar 03, 2012 2:25 PM GMT
    Its an election year, the numbers will be played with, not like they arent in general...

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    Mar 03, 2012 2:29 PM GMT
    Possible. An engineer friend of mine says his company has a very high % of employees from a certain engineering university in northern Michigan.
  • ohioguy12

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    Mar 03, 2012 5:30 PM GMT
    KyleAD said one of the first questions people ask is 'what high school did you go to?'


    This is very typical Ohio. There is so much pride in high schools it's unreal.

    What's your degree in?
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    Mar 03, 2012 5:42 PM GMT
    ohioguy12 said
    KyleAD said one of the first questions people ask is 'what high school did you go to?'


    This is very typical Ohio. There is so much pride in high schools it's unreal.

    What's your degree in?


    I agree. Everyone asks this. It's strange here in Ohio. You have to go where the opportunities are, and I'd recommend applying in areas (both professionally and geographically) that you didn't consider before.
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    Mar 03, 2012 6:04 PM GMT
    I would say there is. From what I've been told, if it's an entry level position and they have a near by campus, they'll try to recruit locally regardless of whether or not they would have to pay for relocation of the applicant.
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    Mar 03, 2012 11:19 PM GMT
    My degree is from colorado in political science (global politics)... And i dont mean even professional jobs at this point... I have given up on that for now... I mean the zoo, museums, mailrooms, retail... I seriously dont know what to do about it... I was thinking of changing my name to be more ethnic so i would be a good diversity candidate.
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    Mar 04, 2012 6:00 PM GMT
    If you live in Toledo, try applying about an hour north of you, in Ann Arbor, Ypsilanti, and Detroit Metro. You could commute for a while if you get a job there, and eventually just move there.

    I went to college in NW Ohio and stayed around the area for a while, and about 2009, the job market just crashed there. School districts cut back, the state froze hiring, and Toledo/Bowling Green really have no new business or industry to speak of. People are financially conservative and many delayed their retirements so there are very few openings.

    The best stop-gap solutions I can suggest for you for just a "job" that pays the bills are Cedar Point -- but be picky about what jobs you will accept. They work people to death. It's not as bad if you have an air-conditioned office job (reservations, or hotel.) The second suggestion is substitute teaching. Pay is low, and you have to do a lot of running around to get started with it, but it is steady work during the school year. Another thought is to look at HigherEdJobs and see what openings you can find at University of Toledo, since they are not a state-funded school.

    I can't think of a single place in Northern Ohio that would value a "global politics" degree. Midwesterners generally do not think globally. You need to be in Washington, DC, New York, or the California coast with that degree. At the very least -- a state capitol or university town where there might be some progressive non-profits, think tanks, and government jobs. So if you stay in the Midwest, focus on Columbus or Ann Arbor, or even Toronto if you find a lead there.

    Even if your savings are out, Ann Arbor/Ypsi is still a reasonable option for you. I would bet there is a more employment activity near University of Michigan than there is in NW Ohio. How much more, I don't know, but it is a larger and more progressive metro area. Even the Detroit suburbs may have something for you (they are well-off and very different than the city of Detroit) and you're looking at less than a 90 minute commute to get there.
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    Mar 04, 2012 6:04 PM GMT
    All that being said, I really liked Ohio and I miss it. The people are great and I was never bored. I would go back in a heartbeat especially if I found a job in Columbus.

    How did you end up living there after graduating from Colorado?