United Empire Loyalists' Association of Canada

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    Mar 03, 2012 2:06 PM GMT
    Since this place is thicker with Canadians than cockroaches in a crack house, I thought I would ask if anybody is familiar with this organization: United Empire Loyalists' Association of Canada.
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    Mar 03, 2012 4:14 PM GMT
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Empire_Loyalist

    They were people who sided with the British Empire during the American Revolution and as is with most wars, they were forced out after they lost.

    Canada, being the closest friendly territory, took them in.

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    Mar 03, 2012 4:28 PM GMT
    Haaretz saidhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Empire_Loyalist

    They were people who sided with the British Empire during the American Revolution and as is with most wars, they were forced out after they lost.

    Canada, being the closest friendly territory, took them in.


    Thanks. I was wondering more about the association, not who the loyalists were. I know who the loyalists were....my ancestors! Ha! I want to know more about their resettlement....and on this the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812, if they were involved in the defense of Canada....ergo, my interest in UELAC
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    Mar 03, 2012 4:46 PM GMT
    My first American boyfriend was from Maine. His family had been rather wealthy, having been deeded roughly 1/4 of the current state of Maine by the Crown.

    His grandparents still have the original deed from like 300 or more years ago.

    Well, they were Loyalists and when the War was finished, they had to book it to Canada and they abandoned their land, buildings and other assets.

    When his family eventually returned to the Maine after a few decades, they were poor and to this day barely eek out a living as lobster folk.

    What's the lesson in this: make sure you pick the right side in the war. Your choice will have impact for centuries.
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    Mar 03, 2012 4:51 PM GMT
    blessed be the lobster folk! LOL! i absolutely LOVE lobster icon_razz.gif and Canadians!
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    Mar 03, 2012 5:18 PM GMT
    Caslon18453 saidSince this place is thicker with Canadians than cockroaches in a crack house, I thought I would ask if anybody is familiar with this organization: United Empire Loyalists' Association of Canada.


    I resemble that remark!!!!

    Don't know anything about the UELAC but I'm sure they're nice people icon_biggrin.gif
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    Mar 03, 2012 5:28 PM GMT
    The 'association' part looks like a bunch of bored people trying to construct a special identity for themselves.

    http://www.uelac.org/
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    Mar 03, 2012 5:52 PM GMT
    An interesting note regarding these United Empire Loyalists is their migration to Canada transformed its European population from a majority Francophone population to a majority Anglophone population. Canada would be a majority French-speaking country today had these people stayed put and supported their fellow citizens in what became the US.
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    Mar 03, 2012 7:16 PM GMT
    Haaretz saidWhat's the lesson in this: make sure you pick the right side in the war. Your choice will have impact for centuries.

    I have American patriot ancestors who fought in the Revolution, too. I don't notice much difference in the faring of any of them.

    It's interesting for me to go back in my family's tree and see how it shook out with some staying in the US and others skedaddling to Canada. The establishment of the current American Constitution seems to be the breaking point.
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    Mar 03, 2012 7:29 PM GMT
    To digress somewhat, near where I live, there is the site in Plymouth (UK) which was built to house French and American prisoners-of-war during the 1812 war.
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    Mar 03, 2012 8:02 PM GMT
    Ex_Mil8 saidTo digress somewhat, near where I live, there is the site in Plymouth (UK) which was built to house French and American prisoners-of-war during the 1812 war.

    I have an English branch, too. They were easy to trace. They lived in the same town for 600 years! =/