Steel-cut Oats

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 06, 2012 9:48 AM GMT
    I recently read a breakfast forum topic and notice that many members mentioned steel-cut oats. Until reading these posts I had never heard of steel-cut oats (only rolled).

    It sparked my interest and from reading a few articles they are supposedly more beneficial than traditional rolled oats. I was wondering are they easy to source in the USA as I have never seen them here in Australia? Do members find them better than rolled oats as they are claimed to be and how do they taste in comparison?
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    Mar 06, 2012 11:50 AM GMT
    ozgreenguy saidI recently read a breakfast forum topic and notice that many members mentioned steel-cut oats. Until reading these posts I had never heard of steel-cut oats (only rolled).

    It sparked my interest and from reading a few articles they are supposedly more beneficial than traditional rolled oats. I was wondering are they easy to source in the USA as I have never seen them here in Australia? Do members find them better than rolled oats as they are claimed to be and how do they taste in comparison?


    Steel-cut oats are very common here, though that was not true, say, 20 years ago. I like them because they retain more texture after cooking, though they can take much longer to cook than rolled oats.

    In the US they are sometimes marketed as Irish-style oats or Scottish-style, or pin-head oats. Maybe in Australia they are simply called something else? Instead of being steamed and then flattened as rolled oats are, the oats are simply chopped into various size pieces.

    Some people soak them overnight to make them cook faster in the morning. I mix them with twice as much water by volume and then microwave them for five minutes.
  • turtleneckjoc...

    Posts: 4685

    Mar 06, 2012 12:58 PM GMT
    Kobaltjak said
    ozgreenguy saidI recently read a breakfast forum topic and notice that many members mentioned steel-cut oats. Until reading these posts I had never heard of steel-cut oats (only rolled).

    It sparked my interest and from reading a few articles they are supposedly more beneficial than traditional rolled oats. I was wondering are they easy to source in the USA as I have never seen them here in Australia? Do members find them better than rolled oats as they are claimed to be and how do they taste in comparison?


    Steel-cut oats are very common here, though that was not true, say, 20 years ago. I like them because they retain more texture after cooking, though they can take much longer to cook than rolled oats.

    In the US they are sometimes marketed as Irish-style oats or Scottish-style, or pin-head oats. Maybe in Australia they are simply called something else? Instead of being steamed and then flattened as rolled oats are, the oats are simply chopped into various size pieces.

    Some people soak them overnight to make them cook faster in the morning. I mix them with twice as much water by volume and then microwave them for five minutes.


    I do the same with the soaking technique and from the first time I had these, I would never go back to the rolled oats (only for cookies or whatever).

    Steel cut oats can also be made in mass quantity by using a Crock Pot or slow cooker. And, a drizzle of agave on top...excellent!!
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    Mar 06, 2012 1:28 PM GMT
    I only eat adamantium cut oats. That's how I roll....
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    Mar 06, 2012 3:20 PM GMT
    I had trouble sourcing them in Toronto at a price I was willing to pay---one supermarket stocked one brand of them, but they were about 5 times as expensive as the standard rolled oats variety. I eventually found them at a bulk food store instead, and a lot more affordable that way!
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    Mar 06, 2012 3:43 PM GMT
    McCann's is the expensive brand packed in a tin. They also have several varieties less expensively packed. I find it hard to believe that there is not some brand or other of them in Australia. It's just that they tend to lie below the merchandising surface because wifey must cook them, rather than simply pour water into them. Oh the burden of putting a pan on the stove and stirring oatmeal into boiling water!

    Dey good!

    Got a spurtle?
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    Mar 06, 2012 3:56 PM GMT
    cdncuteboy saidI had trouble sourcing them in Toronto at a price I was willing to pay---one supermarket stocked one brand of them, but they were about 5 times as expensive as the standard rolled oats variety. I eventually found them at a bulk food store instead, and a lot more affordable that way!


    This is really the only way to buy any kind of oats, grains, quinoa, barley, flours, etc. Never buy in a pretty box. Compare a box of steal cut oats for $5 to $7 for about 2 lbs vs in bulk $1 to $1.50 a pound. Also in bulk you can buy smaller quantities of things like spices so they don't go bad on you and you don't throw away your hard earned bucks. Invest in some nice air tight containers to store your bulk goods and mother nature will thank you too.
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    Mar 06, 2012 4:09 PM GMT
    Preaching to the choir, Trail_Runner. It's only before Christmas though that a bulk food store opened anywhere near me. Before that it meant half an hour on the subway for a shop that was about the size of my bathroom. This one opened a few months ago, as I said, and they are constantly busy.
  • laxdude25

    Posts: 604

    Mar 06, 2012 4:09 PM GMT
    I lived in Australia/Melbourne from 1986/1994, and used to buy steel cut oats at the Prahan and Victoria markets, and also at some organic store in South Yarra.
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    Mar 06, 2012 6:02 PM GMT
    I buy the 50 lb bag (Canadian steel-cut oats) on-line for $58 from Honeyville Grain, a California company. The cost of shipping for the 50 lb bag is $4.49. Great quality and super price.

    http://store.honeyvillegrain.com/steelcutoats50lb.aspx
  • FredMG

    Posts: 988

    Mar 06, 2012 6:12 PM GMT
    cdncuteboy saidPreaching to the choir, Trail_Runner. It's only before Christmas though that a bulk food store opened anywhere near me. Before that it meant half an hour on the subway for a shop that was about the size of my bathroom. This one opened a few months ago, as I said, and they are constantly busy.


    We don't' have subways in Portland. We use bikes and trailers and get back and forth to the food co-op and bulk bins in a bout half the time of a bus/subway ride. Oh, and bike riding, it's like exercise you know.
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Mar 06, 2012 6:30 PM GMT
    i'm always saddened more people don't eat steel-cut oats... compared to rolled oats, it's like eating in-n-out vs. mc donalds
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    Mar 06, 2012 7:58 PM GMT
    ozgreenguy saidas I have never seen them here in Australia?


    you'll find them at any health food shop in bulk bins or 500g packets. easy to prepare but not instant. you leave them soak overnight in water etc.
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    Mar 06, 2012 8:02 PM GMT
    tcom said
    ozgreenguy saidas I have never seen them here in Australia?


    you'll find them at any health food shop in bulk bins or 500g packets. easy to prepare but not instant. you leave them soak overnight in water etc.



    A great brand is Bob's Red Mill. Quality stuff, and they are par-cooked so cooking time is more like 10 minutes instead of 30. Three cups of water to 1 cup of the par-cooked kind.
  • neosyllogy

    Posts: 1714

    Mar 06, 2012 8:11 PM GMT
    Yeah, they're really easy to find. Though they're much more common (prominent) in healthfood stores like Whole Foods/ Trader Joes, most regular super markets have some brands of steel cut.

    You might try looking on Amazon.com. I'd be surprised if you didn't have access to them. Like quinoa, it's one of those things you don't really notice until someone points it out to you.

    Downside is they take much longer to cook (I normally use regular [but not "instant"] oatmeal[. But I think steel cut tastes awesome!
  • Kwokpot

    Posts: 329

    Mar 06, 2012 8:17 PM GMT
    Aldi's supermarket sells both the steel cut as well as the rolled variety of Oatmeal or porridge.
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    Mar 06, 2012 8:21 PM GMT
    A timesaving tip from lifehacker for steel cut oats - freeze them in silicone cups -

    http://lifehacker.com/5890187/freeze-oatmeal-in-silicone-baking-cups

    Freeze Oatmeal in Silicone Baking Cups
    Old fashioned oatmeal tastes much better than instant varieties, is cheaper, and better for you. The downside is that it takes a while to cook, usually 10-20 minutes or a little longer if you use steel-cut oats. Why not make a large batch when you have the time and then freeze individual portions in silicone muffin tins and/or baking cups?

    Crafting weblog Make Something... recommends preparing a batch of oatmeal for freezing using just rolled or steel-cut oats, water and salt. 3 cups of oats, 5.5 cups of water, and 1 tsp of salt will make enough for twelve small servings. When the oatmeal has finished cooking you can transfer it to the silicone cups or muffin tin and place in the freezer for a few hours until thoroughly frozen. Pop the frozen oatmeal "pucks" into a plastic freezer bag and they'll be ready to go for a month or longer.

    You can also add in most oatmeal toppings before freezing such as brown sugar, raisins, nuts, other dried fruits and spices, but save fresh fruit and milk until you've reheated the oatmeal. To do so, place the frozen oatmeal puck in a microwave safe bowl and nuke for 2 minutes on high. Stir it, and then microwave for another 30 seconds, and add any last minute toppings such as banana slices or milk.

    Last year we covered a similar idea, making an oatmeal breakfast for the week in 5 minutes but if you're like me you don't want the same thing for breakfast every day. By freezing the oatmeal it's available whenever you have a craving and it's also great if your kitchen area at work has a a freezer. Also you can buy frozen oatmeal at the grocery store but our DIY version comes out to around twelve cents a serving before additional toppings.
  • neosyllogy

    Posts: 1714

    Mar 06, 2012 8:26 PM GMT
    riddler78 saidA timesaving tip from lifehacker for steel cut oats - freeze them in silicone cups -

    http://lifehacker.com/5890187/freeze-oatmeal-in-silicone-baking-cups

    Freeze Oatmeal in Silicone Baking Cups
    Old fashioned oatmeal tastes much better than instant varieties, is cheaper, and better for you. The downside is that it takes a while to cook, usually 10-20 minutes or a little longer if you use steel-cut oats. Why not make a large batch when you have the time and then freeze individual portions in silicone muffin tins and/or baking cups?

    Crafting weblog Make Something... recommends preparing a batch of oatmeal for freezing using just rolled or steel-cut oats, water and salt. 3 cups of oats, 5.5 cups of water, and 1 tsp of salt will make enough for twelve small servings. When the oatmeal has finished cooking you can transfer it to the silicone cups or muffin tin and place in the freezer for a few hours until thoroughly frozen. Pop the frozen oatmeal "pucks" into a plastic freezer bag and they'll be ready to go for a month or longer.

    You can also add in most oatmeal toppings before freezing such as brown sugar, raisins, nuts, other dried fruits and spices, but save fresh fruit and milk until you've reheated the oatmeal. To do so, place the frozen oatmeal puck in a microwave safe bowl and nuke for 2 minutes on high. Stir it, and then microwave for another 30 seconds, and add any last minute toppings such as banana slices or milk.

    Last year we covered a similar idea, making an oatmeal breakfast for the week in 5 minutes but if you're like me you don't want the same thing for breakfast every day. By freezing the oatmeal it's available whenever you have a craving and it's also great if your kitchen area at work has a a freezer. Also you can buy frozen oatmeal at the grocery store but our DIY version comes out to around twelve cents a serving before additional toppings.


    What a good idea!
    I've actually bought frozen cooked steel cut oats before (from TJ's), but never thought about just doing it myself. Awesome! icon_biggrin.gif
    (I'm still learning about the whole "cooking" mindset. : )
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    Mar 06, 2012 9:28 PM GMT
    Trader Joe's actually empowered me to cook a lot. A lot of their products is doing all the prep work of cooking for you like marinating meat so you can just toss in the oven, tossing together ingredients so you can just fry or freezing and preparing food so you can just microwave. When you see that it's really not that much extra work to do the prep work, you realize (some) cooking may not necessarily be all that stressful or time consuming. And it helps if you know the technique like that DIY oatmeal freezing link.
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    Mar 07, 2012 2:50 AM GMT
    I've tried steel-cut oats but didn't like their chewy characteristic (apparently they need more cooking or preparation than rolled oats do). I cannot imagine that they are healthier than rolled oats, just a cheaper/faster way of giving oats more surface area so that they cook faster than traditional whole oats.

    I pulverize rolled oats in a blender as the first stage of making my morning protein smoothie. It's much quicker than cooking and no additional dish needs to be washed.
  • nvaguy69

    Posts: 54

    Mar 07, 2012 3:06 AM GMT
    These are better than regular processed oats because they break down slower in your system spreading the carbohydrates out over a longer period of time and keep blood sugar levels lower while still delivering energy.

    They take a good while to cook though, 25 minutes roughly. Just make a batch, but in frig.. they keep a good 4 days.

    I buy either Quaker Oat Steel Cut or McCann's Irish Steel Cut Oats. McCann's has made a quicker cooking steel cut version where they have further refined the oat cut, but still not the processed flake you're used to.

  • tuffguyndc

    Posts: 4437

    Mar 07, 2012 3:08 AM GMT
    ozgreenguy saidI recently read a breakfast forum topic and notice that many members mentioned steel-cut oats. Until reading these posts I had never heard of steel-cut oats (only rolled).

    It sparked my interest and from reading a few articles they are supposedly more beneficial than traditional rolled oats. I was wondering are they easy to source in the USA as I have never seen them here in Australia? Do members find them better than rolled oats as they are claimed to be and how do they taste in comparison?
    i have never had them but you can find them in grocery stores that have a all natural food isle or you can go to place where they sell all natural foods.
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    Mar 07, 2012 8:23 AM GMT
    Thanks everyone for your suggestions. Sounds like I need to look a bit harder. icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif
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    Mar 08, 2012 5:26 AM GMT
    ozgreenguy saidI recently read a breakfast forum topic and notice that many members mentioned steel-cut oats.

    I'd mentioned this on probably that very breakfast thread but figured I'd repost this excerpt here for benefit(?) of those members who may have missed it:


    2a8fbpw.jpg

    Steel cut oatmeal with flaxseed, chia seed, blueberries, egg whites and plain almonds....on the go with my cooler given my schedule I sometimes eat it refrigerated and I swear it tastes almost like rice pudding, especially when I skip the egg whites and add bananas, raisins and strawberries. Yeah, it takes awhile to cook the steel cut version but I just cook a cup at a time which yields (for me) six individual [refrigerated Tupperwared] servings.