Legs!!!

  • gcoastmark

    Posts: 83

    Mar 10, 2012 2:23 PM GMT
    I'm trying to work on my legs - any suggestions for serious definition? Any thoughts on single leg exercises?
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    Mar 10, 2012 3:33 PM GMT
    All you neeto do are lunges and squats
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    Mar 10, 2012 3:35 PM GMT
    Do the seated squats... look for the machine where the only thing that moves is the feet platform, not the seat itself... Trust me on this one
  • muscletruk

    Posts: 109

    Mar 10, 2012 3:49 PM GMT
    I've been trying for years to cut my legs. I've got decent mass but never cut.
    I think proper form deep squats and parallel squats are the best
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    Mar 10, 2012 4:30 PM GMT
    Dont forget Deadlifts for your posterior chain.
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    Mar 10, 2012 5:23 PM GMT
    Do squats, with your feet close together, with semi high reps. After you rack the weight, immmediatly keep doing more reps, without any weight at all. Do these very low and don't lock out , at the top. Do about 20 reps, or until you can't stand the pain. It will feel like knives, being stuck in your thighs. Another trick, is to do stripping. Do a set, then take off 10 lbs on each side..and continue..then take off another 10, and continue. This can be done with lunges and dumbells. Just run the rack of dumbells, going a bit lighter, each new set of .dumbells. I do these intensity tricks, with every body part, and it keeps me ripped.It isn't easy ..very few want to train, that hard.
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    Mar 10, 2012 5:45 PM GMT
    My legs were the most cut when I hiked 2km vertical twice a week for a few months. With the inclination, it would be similar to two hours of lunges, but I tend to think it was the endurance aspect of the exercise that helped with definition. In the gym I would agree with high reps, as above.
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    Mar 10, 2012 5:51 PM GMT
    Agree w KarateKid's advice for an awesome free-weight workout.

    If you're not yet at that level to do free weights (i.e. the bar with plates you put on the ends), then you need to search out machines that do the same thing.

    My routine:

    Barbell Squats
    - you're holding a bar across your shoulders and you squat down til your knees bend to about 90* angle (thighs horizontal), then you stand up straight again.
    - try not to lock out your knees but keep it a smooth motion up and down and up and down.
    - great for your quads (thighs) and your glutes (butt) but also activates calves and hamstrings.
    - a great all-around leg exercise, involving balance, strength, and motion
    - best to be careful, because if you don't do this correctly you can injure yourself. better to start with low weights and gradually build up strength over time.

    Leg Extensions
    - you're seated with bent knees at 90* angle
    - you unbend your knees to lift your foot to straighten your leg
    - these target your quads and all the little muscles in your thighs.
    - if you do high intensity reps, at a low/medium weight, you'll get the cutting definition you're looking for.

    Hamstring Curls
    - there are different machines for this - either standing up, lying on your stomach, or kneeling, usually with a cabled connection to weight plates
    - they all do the same thing, you have to bend your leg from a straight position to a 90* angle
    - targets the backs of your legs, to balance all the other work you've been doing with your squats and extensions
    - again, less is more. do low/medium weight at higher reps to achieve the strength and definition you're after.

    Dead Lifts
    - works the upper glute and your lower back
    - this is just great to top off the whole package, add strength and flexibility to your posture.
    - careful with the weights though, if you haven't done this.
    - just like barbell squats, you can do damage if you don't do this right and its better to gain strength and flexibility slowly, by starting with low weight and gradually increasing over a period of weeks/months.
  • gcoastmark

    Posts: 83

    Mar 10, 2012 8:36 PM GMT
    Thanks guys...I've been doing squats till the cows come home, guess i need to followed that up with some "ass to the grass" squats without weights. Has definitely helped the ass...maybe the higher reps will help out too...

    Saw a guy doing single leg work but that would seem to only help strength...dunno..icon_confused.gif
  • gcoastmark

    Posts: 83

    Mar 10, 2012 8:39 PM GMT
    kingmo saidAgree w KarateKid's advice for an awesome free-weight workout.

    If you're not yet at that level to do free weights (i.e. the bar with plates you put on the ends), then you need to search out machines that do the same thing.

    My routine:

    Barbell Squats
    - you're holding a bar across your shoulders and you squat down til your knees bend to about 90* angle (thighs horizontal), then you stand up straight again.
    - try not to lock out your knees but keep it a smooth motion up and down and up and down.
    - great for your quads (thighs) and your glutes (butt) but also activates calves and hamstrings.
    - a great all-around leg exercise, involving balance, strength, and motion
    - best to be careful, because if you don't do this correctly you can injure yourself. better to start with low weights and gradually build up strength over time.

    Leg Extensions
    - you're seated with bent knees at 90* angle
    - you unbend your knees to lift your foot to straighten your leg
    - these target your quads and all the little muscles in your thighs.
    - if you do high intensity reps, at a low/medium weight, you'll get the cutting definition you're looking for.

    Hamstring Curls
    - there are different machines for this - either standing up, lying on your stomach, or kneeling, usually with a cabled connection to weight plates
    - they all do the same thing, you have to bend your leg from a straight position to a 90* angle
    - targets the backs of your legs, to balance all the other work you've been doing with your squats and extensions
    - again, less is more. do low/medium weight at higher reps to achieve the strength and definition you're after.

    Dead Lifts
    - works the upper glute and your lower back
    - this is just great to top off the whole package, add strength and flexibility to your posture.
    - careful with the weights though, if you haven't done this.
    - just like barbell squats, you can do damage if you don't do this right and its better to gain strength and flexibility slowly, by starting with low weight and gradually increasing over a period of weeks/months.


    Thanks...I'll start this tomorrow. Leg day!!!
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    Mar 10, 2012 8:47 PM GMT
    I just started dead lifting and am obsessed with it. I refrained from dead lifting for so long because I felt I would injure my lower back as I've had lower back problems earlier in my life. However, if you pay strict attention to your form you should do well (I've had the privilege of having a power lifter coach and advise me with dead lifting).

    I consistently hit 315lbs for a max weight; I'm hoping by the beginning of next month I will at least be able to pick up 405lbs. What I enjoy most about dead lifting is that it feels more challenging than most exercises I do. This challenge aspect is evident in the fact that the weights I lift are the heaviest I've lifted out of any exercise I've done.
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    Mar 10, 2012 9:30 PM GMT
    [Clicked on the thread, assuming this was going to be a pics thread...] icon_confused.gif
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    Mar 10, 2012 10:12 PM GMT
    Definition is a function of body fat levels. High reps, nor low reps, DO NOT promote definition. Low body fat levels promote definition.

    Size is a function of calories and endurance. Moderate to high reps (8 to more)

    Strength is a function of technique, nervous system, and your ability to generate power. (single rep maxes to 6 rip maxes).

    There is no such thing as spot reduction (unless we're talking liop suction).
  • gcoastmark

    Posts: 83

    Mar 10, 2012 11:04 PM GMT
    Scotticus said[Clicked on the thread, assuming this was going to be a pics thread...] icon_confused.gif


    meh...what the hell....if you got'em and proud of'em.... Let's see! icon_biggrin.gif
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    Mar 10, 2012 11:05 PM GMT
    Feel free to stretch and spread them wide to get the best out and into them icon_twisted.gif
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    Mar 11, 2012 1:07 AM GMT
    Seated squats are great
  • Hunkymonkey

    Posts: 215

    Mar 12, 2012 5:29 PM GMT
    Leg extensions, squats or deadlifts, leg curls, calves (one session seated, one session standing). In that order. Extensions function as the warmup. I do squats and deadlifts as deep as possible because that engages the glutes and develops them quite nicely. Squats that don't go at least parallel to the ground can cause tendonitis in the knees. Leg curls build thickness in the back of the leg. Lunges are good for front quads and glutes, but I see them as optional if you have bad knees as I do. Start now, summer is coming icon_lol.gif
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    Mar 12, 2012 5:34 PM GMT
    I walk a lot! Always have since 7th grade, and only owned a car for 2 years of my life. I walk about 14 miles in a week, at least. It's good for your legs, butt, and calves. I run only when I workout and still do that on the side. Walking is more transportation than exercise in my opinion. You should walk as much as possible.

    Later on, when you're used to walking miles at a time, you should consider walking with either a backpack full of heavy things, or a weight vest to build overall muscle, strength and endurance. Remember to walk with a proper posture, cause you'll walk with an air or confidence when you're at work, shopping or whatever... ; )
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    Mar 12, 2012 5:51 PM GMT
    Ditto what everyone is saying about going as deep as possible with your squats and leg presses. My quads are finally starting to come out of hiding after adding some low weight, ass-to-the-ground squats to my routine after my heavy normal squats. It hurts like hell, but if I can barely stand afterward, I know I've done it right. Use the smith machine for them so you can really go to failure. icon_twisted.gif