Pink Slime Found In 70% Of Supermarket Ground Beef

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    Mar 11, 2012 5:09 AM GMT
    Boy, I'm glad I shop at an organic food market!


    "...According to a recent "ABC World News" report from Jim Avila, 70% of ground beef sold in supermarkets contains the ammonia-treated sludge, which is the the product of a method for salvaging meat scraps from otherwise unusable parts of a carcass.

    Avila was tipped off to the startling figure by a whistleblower at the USDA -- who says he has quit his job out of disgust with the product.

    The level of usage is consistent with a 2009 report on pink slime by the New York Times. The paper wrote that "a majority" of ground beef in America contained the substance, which is manufactured by a company called Beef Products, Inc.

    Since then, fast food companies have discontinued their use of the product en masse. Pink slime is still in the mix of the ground beef used in school lunches, however. ...

    [url]http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/03/08/pink-slime-supermarket-ground-beef_n_1332429.html?ref=mostpopular
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    Mar 12, 2012 5:22 AM GMT
    mmmmmmmmm gooooooooooooo
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    Mar 12, 2012 6:37 AM GMT
    Hate to burst your bubble, but your organic ground beef could contain pink slime.
  • calibro

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    Mar 12, 2012 7:06 AM GMT
    MolaMola saidHate to burst your bubble, but your organic ground beef could contain pink slime.


    organic pink slime
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    Mar 12, 2012 7:17 AM GMT
    Yummy icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Mar 12, 2012 7:22 AM GMT
    We never buy ground beef for home consumption, but might have a hamburger once at month at a restaurant we like. They claim it's 100% angus, and they really are good, but could pink slime be in it, too?

    How do you know, whether buying your own ground beef or restaurant food? Maybe next time friends have a backyard cookout we should grind our own to bring. There's a meat grinder attachment for the stand mixer here somewhere...
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    Mar 12, 2012 7:30 AM GMT
    Art_Deco saidWe never buy ground beef for home consumption, but might have a hamburger once at month at a restaurant we like. They claim it's 100% Angus, and they really are good, but could pink slime be in it, too?

    How do you know, whether buying your own ground beef or restaurant food? Maybe next time friends have a backyard cookout we should grind our own to bring. There's a meat grinder attachment for the stand mixer here somewhere...


    Or a Moon Light Supper maybe, with only very important people.icon_razz.gif
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    Mar 12, 2012 7:41 AM GMT
    Ugh. I need to buy a farm and raise my own food. That's the only way to ensure that it's real and authentic anymore.

    I've always wondered about those "hamburgers" that my school cafeteria used to serve us. Those things were beyond nasty yet everyone ate them.
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    Mar 12, 2012 7:56 AM GMT
    EastCoastNAZ saidUgh. I need to buy a farm and raise my own food. That's the only way to ensure that it's real and authentic anymore.

    I've always wondered about those "hamburgers" that my school cafeteria used to serve us. Those things were beyond nasty yet everyone ate them.

    Well I guess the biggest offenders for additives and scrap parts would be ground and processed food, like ground beef, lunch meats, hot dogs, sausages, and so forth. Much of that would be avoided when buying whole cuts, and seafood.

    I never eat a fast-food hamburger. Aside from the pink slime issue, they cook them to a dried, tasteless well-done, which I hate. I know it's a health concern to kill bacteria, but in non-chain restaurants we use they'll still cook a hamburger medium-rare to order. But even then we seldom eat a hamburger anymore, just not healthy overall for our diets, so we mostly stick to poultry & seafood.
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    Mar 12, 2012 11:47 AM GMT
    On cuts of meat, the bacteria are on the surface. When the meat is ground up, the bacteria get distributed throughout the meat, which is why there's a risk when cooking burgers to red/pink. If you grind your own meat, you can plunge the whole cut of meat in boiling water for 30-60 seconds before cutting it up and grinding it.
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    Mar 12, 2012 5:39 PM GMT
    MolaMola saidHate to burst your bubble, but your organic ground beef could contain pink slime.

    The ground beef I buy at the organic grocery store is from a local farm. They aren't washing it in ammonia.
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    Mar 12, 2012 5:44 PM GMT
    The solution is simple: buy a roast, and ask your butcher grind it to your specifications. Or grind your own if you still have an old fashioned, hand-cranked meat grinder.
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    Mar 12, 2012 5:46 PM GMT
    Ariodante saidmmmmmmmmm gooooooooooooo


    Haha... mmmmm >)
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    Mar 12, 2012 5:48 PM GMT
    paradox saidOn cuts of meat, the bacteria are on the surface. When the meat is ground up, the bacteria get distributed throughout the meat, which is why there's a risk when cooking burgers to red/pink. If you grind your own meat, you can plunge the whole cut of meat in boiling water for 30-60 seconds before cutting it up and grinding it.

    These are good points. My husband has a horror of causing food poisoning at home, not just of ourselves but more importantly our dinner guests. Some of whom have weakened immune systems.

    For that reason he always sanitizes his cutting boards before using them, and uses a thermometer to cook. And he recleans the boards when he prepares different items. Nothing that uncooked poultry has touched may be allowed to touch anything else until the items have first been sanitized, and of course he's cleaning his hands continuously.

    He also insisted when we bought a new dishwasher that it have a certified hi-temp sanitize cycle that we always use, except for fragile items. And if I'll be setting the table more formally with stored dinnerware we haven't used & cleaned in some time, I'll run them through the dishwasher again just before using them.

    I also put the manual can opener in the dishwasher (I've seen cutting wheels so filth encrusted as to turn your stomach), along with every utensil & device that touches food, if it'll fit inside the machine and can tolerate the heat. Our utility food scissors are Wüsthof that come apart with a twist, and also go into the dishwasher after each use, just like all the cutlery.
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    Mar 12, 2012 6:20 PM GMT
    Glad I don't eat meat!
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    Mar 12, 2012 6:21 PM GMT
    MolaMola: Hate to burst your bubble, but your organic ground beef could contain pink slime.

    jockfever: Where is the evidence for this claim?

    Pink slime is a filler.

    "a package is stamped "USDA Organic," then it's pure meat and has no filler."

    "If the ground beef is labeled certified USDA organic, than it cannot contain any fillers, so it will not have pink slime in it."


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    Mar 12, 2012 6:26 PM GMT
    mocktwinkie saidGlad I don't eat meat!
    Ditto! This is a no slime zone! icon_lol.gif
  • KissTheSky

    Posts: 1980

    Mar 12, 2012 6:26 PM GMT
    mocktwinkie saidGlad I don't eat meat!


    Me too. Ammonia mixed with rotting animal carcass.... does not sound appealing to me at all.
  • neon4u

    Posts: 1152

    Mar 12, 2012 6:45 PM GMT
    The ammonia does not salvage the meat. The meat is removed from bone and the insides of the animal through a process (centrifuge). A lot of that meat is sent to make pet food. Some is sent to grocery stores. But most is sent to fast food chains. (Now do you understand how they can sell you a hamburger for 99c. They use this meat taken from old dairy cows.) The ammonia disinfects and kills bacteria such as e-coli. Interestingly enough, the meat used for dogs and cats don't go through this process because they can handle the e-coli. Humans can't so it is soaked in a water based solution with ammonia. So the best thing to do if you want a hamburger….grind a whole piece of meat yourself. You know what inside then.
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    Mar 12, 2012 7:02 PM GMT
    Well I was watching an old clip last night from an old Pommie show "Till Death Do us Part. Were they were talking about how they put womens hormones into mince, and it turns guys into poofters if they eat hamburgers.icon_lol.gif

    icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif
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    Mar 12, 2012 8:09 PM GMT


    Right now I only buy mince from the farm shop (free range meat) but once I get round to buying a food processor I'm not even buying that. Some things you shouldn't leave to other people.

    PS Ammonia is super-tasty http://www.dutchsweets.com/product_info.php?products_id=272
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    Mar 12, 2012 8:39 PM GMT
    ah I dont worry about too much. Out of mind out of sight

    Love me some burgers and meat load....errr I mean meat loaf
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    Mar 12, 2012 9:31 PM GMT
    Yawn. More "OMG dangerous CHEMICALS!" bullshit.

    "Pink slime" is essentially scrap meat that is spun in a centrifuge to remove fat from the meat. It is then treated with ammonia (aka "ammonium hydroxide" when in solution) as an anti-microbial agent.

    If we're gonna get all batshit crazy over the centrifuge process, keep in mind that it's nothing more than a non-chemical way of making the meat leaner. If it's the ammonia/ammonium hydroxide part that worries you, ammonia and ammonium hydroxide exist naturally in humans and animals. The FDA approved and classified ammonium hydroxide as GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe) back in 1974.

    http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/fcn/fcnDetailNavigation.cfm?rpt=scogsListing&id=27

    http://www.foodinsight.org/Resources/Detail.aspx?topic=Questions_and_Answers_about_Ammonium_Hydroxide_Use_in_Food_Production

    Q: If ammonia is safe, why do I think of it as a harmful chemical?

    A: Probably because ammonia is also used as a sanitizer in many household and industrial cleaners. Although necessary for life, too much ammonia is harmful. Ammonia vapor at levels higher than those found in common household cleaners is an irritant to the eyes, mucous membranes, and lungs. Consuming ammonia orally can cause burns to the mouth, throat, and stomach. Theoretically, it is possible to estimate a lethal oral dose of ammonia based on animal studies, but the amount would be so high that ingestion would be inconceivable. Ammonia has a strong odor and taste, so amounts that would be harmful are unpalatable and highly unlikely to be ingested.

    Q: Is ammonium hydroxide in food processing a safe substance?

    A: Yes, provided it is used in accordance with good manufacturing practices (e.g., only food grade ammonium hydroxide is used). It has been used safely for decades. As noted above, FDA affirmed ammonium hydroxide as GRAS after extensive study back in 1974, and it had been used in food processing long before that date.
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    Mar 12, 2012 9:54 PM GMT
    pink-slime-wimpy.jpg
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    Mar 12, 2012 10:02 PM GMT
    Uh oh...


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