Research the Unconscious

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    Jul 09, 2008 3:26 AM GMT
    https://implicit.harvard.edu

    Project Implicit represents a collaborative research effort between researchers at Harvard University, the University of Virginia, and University of Washington. While the particular purposes of each study vary considerably, most studies available at Project Implicit examine thoughts and feelings that exist either outside of conscious awareness or outside of conscious control. The primary goals of Project Implicit are to provide a safe, secure, and well-designed virtual environment to investigate psychological issues and, at the same time, provide visitors and participants with an experience that is both educational and engaging.

    _______________________________
    Results of a study I participated in:

    Thank you for participating. Here is some general information about the goals of the study as well as feedback about your IAT performance.

    The study began with a mental rotation task. We are testing whether the suggestion of the possibility of a gender difference in performance on this task--and that it is related to math and science performance--can affect men's and women's performance differently because of a phenomenon known as stereotype threat. Therefore, you were randomly assigned to receive one of two sets of instructions: either (1) a set including the true statement that many researchers compare males' and females' performance and a note about the relation between performance on the task and math and science performance; or (2) a set making no mention of gender or of math and science.

    Research has found that reminding a person about a stereotype of their group can interfere with their performance on tasks that are relevant to that stereotype. Studies have found that when individuals are reminded of a stereotype about their group, working memory capacity (the mechanism for temporarily holding and rehearsing information) is decreased, causing a shift in attention from the current task to thinking about the potential to confirm the stereotype (Schmader & Johns, 2003) . Stereotype threat has been shown to affect mental rotation performance in a laboratory setting; we are testing whether it has an influence for people taking the test online, and, additionally, whether such conditions cause a shift in the degree to which participants implicitly associate math with male and language arts with female.

    You completed an IAT measuring the relative strength of associations between gender and the academic domains of math and language arts. These are your results:
    Your data suggest a slight association of Male with Math and Female with Language Arts compared to Female with Math and Male with Language Arts.

    Depending on the magnitude of your result, your automatic associations may be described as 'slight', 'moderate', 'strong', or 'little to no preference'. How implicit associations affect our judgments and behaviors is not well understood. Also, your score described above may be influenced by a number of variables including your familiarity with the categories and the particular items used to represent the categories. As such, the score should serve as an opportunity for self-reflection, not as a definitive assessment of your implicit thoughts or feelings. This and future research will clarify the way in which implicit thinking and feelings affects our perception, judgment, and action.

    The topic of this task was randomly assigned to you from a list of dozens of topics. You are welcome to complete as many sessions as you wish, and every session will be a different topic. Some will be topics you have thought about many times, others might be new or unusual topics that you have not considered before. Just return to the login page and enter your email address to start again.

    Thanks again for your participation.
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    Jul 09, 2008 3:59 AM GMT
    And may the Force be with you icon_eek.gificon_biggrin.gif
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    Jul 09, 2008 4:05 AM GMT

    Whoa!

    DanteCA, You should check out the topic 'is RJ getting twinkier" there's a few that should read this post of yours!

    heheh -Doug


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    Jul 09, 2008 4:24 AM GMT
    fitguymike saidAnd may the Force be with you icon_eek.gificon_biggrin.gif


    haha Some of my friends want me to be Yoda for Halloween. icon_razz.gif

    Unaware you are of the unconscious, young man. Seeing you must, to become aware of what is unseen. icon_wink.gif
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    Jul 09, 2008 4:46 AM GMT
    The force works in the conscious and unconcious realms. And it is indeed unseen, much like the wind icon_cool.gif

    Your arrogance blinds you master yoda...
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    Jul 09, 2008 10:02 AM GMT
    Is it just me or does the "thanks" in the last line, not go with the tone of the text.

    I'm going to have to look over this study when I get the time.
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    Jul 09, 2008 11:54 AM GMT
    DanteCA
    Research has found that reminding a person about a stereotype of their group can interfere with their performance on tasks that are relevant to that stereotype. Studies have found that when individuals are reminded of a stereotype about their group, working memory capacity (the mechanism for temporarily holding and rehearsing information) is decreased, causing a shift in attention from the current task to thinking about the potential to confirm the stereotype (Schmader & Johns, 2003) .


    Interesting it is. Study homosexuals does not include? icon_razz.gif Researchers you are gay do not know?

    Gay stereotypes different from Male stereotypes they are.
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    Jul 09, 2008 2:48 PM GMT
    Interesting research, Dante. The gist of the study, then, is that we are a sum not of our parts, but of what we think our parts are...? What is the larger scope of the project - I mean, to what end is this being conducted?
  • art_smass

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    Jul 09, 2008 3:23 PM GMT
    This is all very confusing, and I think Zdrew just asked to see your "parts."
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    Jul 09, 2008 3:24 PM GMT
    art_smass saidThis is all very confusing, and I think Zdrew just asked to see your "parts."


    Oh, art, when am I not asking to see someone's parts?

    Speaking of, can I see your parts?
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    Jul 09, 2008 3:59 PM GMT
    So, they did a test to see just how much people actually cared about what other people thought about them and whichever stereotype they happen to fit? Wow, it's like they expect us all to be super self conscious and insecure. I don't care if I do fit a general stereotype of some aspect of my life or not. I've got a least a few I can name off the top of my head right now. They should be focusing on how to market and protray images and scenarios in the media without depending on taking advantage of the insecurities people have and the short comings of the persona type. No offense to you DanteCA read your stuff before, you're a smart good guy, but that test was stupid in my opinion.

    I personally don't care if I'm a flaming faggot around lesbians, the class nerd when I'm a class I really like, or a flirtatious hispanic when I'm dancing all sexified on the dance floor. It's who I am... people should take more pride in whom they are as individuals, no matter how much it momentarily divides them from their peers.
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    Jul 10, 2008 2:08 AM GMT
    zdrew saidInteresting research, Dante. The gist of the study, then, is that we are a sum not of our parts, but of what we think our parts are...? What is the larger scope of the project - I mean, to what end is this being conducted?


    The larger scope of the project is stated below:
    While the particular purposes of each study vary considerably, most studies available at Project Implicit examine thoughts and feelings that exist either outside of conscious awareness or outside of conscious control.

    There are multiple studies (not just the one I posted) in Project Implicit that focus on how our unconscious affects thoughts, feelings, choices, and judgments we make. The goal is to find out how our unconscious affect our conscious reality.


    boiwunderkind1984 saidSo, they did a test to see just how much people actually cared about what other people thought about them and whichever stereotype they happen to fit? Wow, it's like they expect us all to be super self conscious and insecure. I don't care if I do fit a general stereotype of some aspect of my life or not. I've got a least a few I can name off the top of my head right now. They should be focusing on how to market and protray images and scenarios in the media without depending on taking advantage of the insecurities people have and the short comings of the persona type. No offense to you DanteCA read your stuff before, you're a smart good guy, but that test was stupid in my opinion.

    I personally don't care if I'm a flaming faggot around lesbians, the class nerd when I'm a class I really like, or a flirtatious hispanic when I'm dancing all sexified on the dance floor. It's who I am... people should take more pride in whom they are as individuals, no matter how much it momentarily divides them from their peers.


    Why would you feel super self-conscious or insecure about a stereotype or bias you happen to have?
    They are not out to make you all uptight and anxious.
    It is purely a study to better understand how our unconscious influences choices and thoughts.
    No need to get bent out of shape about it. icon_confused.gif
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    Jul 11, 2008 3:18 AM GMT
    "Research has found that reminding a person about a stereotype of their group can interfere with their performance on tasks that are relevant to that stereotype."

    Hmm.

    What about gay stereotypes? How does "stereotype threat" affect that? Does that mean I will decorate my apartment better if someone suggests that gay men are good at that?