Another Whopper From Fox News

  • tokugawa

    Posts: 945

    Mar 18, 2012 3:14 PM GMT
    On Friday, March 16th, in a "straight news" segment, Fox News aired the following graphic supposedly showing "Taxes At The Pump":


    fnc-taxesatpump.jpg

    There are several reasons why this graphic does more to confuse than to inform. First, Fox double-counted state taxes. They included the average state tax of about 23 cents per gallon both in the category "state" taxes and in the category "state & local" taxes. The total of both state and local taxes is 30.4 cents on average. Fox also placed $3.83 at the bottom, as if taxes are in addition to the price for gasoline. But the $3.83 figure already includes the taxes.

    Full story: http://mediamatters.org/blog/201203160013
  • GQjock

    Posts: 11649

    Mar 18, 2012 4:25 PM GMT
    It's at the point where EVERYTHING that comes from them needs verification from another source
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    Mar 18, 2012 4:29 PM GMT
    GQjock saidIt's at the point where EVERYTHING that comes from them needs verification from another source
    IT passed that point long ago. Now it's at the point that Fox needs to be shut down.
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    Mar 18, 2012 6:59 PM GMT
    rofl, I know an RJ guy who does math like that.

    Back in the political furore topics when some gov't employees were told they'd have to pony up for their pensions, it amounted to 6% of their gross income annually.

    That intrepid RJer was demanding where the other 94% was going to come from. icon_lol.gif

    -Doug
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    Mar 18, 2012 7:03 PM GMT
    meninlove said rofl, I know an RJ guy who does math like that.

    Back in the political furore topics when some gov't employees were told they'd have to pony up for their pensions, it amounted to 6% of their gross income annually.

    That intrepid RJer was demanding where the other 94% was going to come from. icon_lol.gif

    -Doug
    LMAO!
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    Mar 18, 2012 8:57 PM GMT
    Like I said before, If you're going to post this kind of garbage you should have a clue about what you're talking about. MediaMatters should have a responsibility to be honest and truthful if they are going to post this kind of trash.

    I may be wrong, but I don't think anyone at Fox represented the graphic as being to exact scale. That's just splitting hairs and nitpicking and is ridiculous.

    As for the double counting of the state taxes, either the blogger at Media Matters is either ignorant of how state taxes are levied on gasoline or flat out lied. Either way it's unacceptable.

    Each state has a different system for taxing gasoline. Some states have an extremely high flat rate, while other states make up for having deceptively low flat rates by adding on additional taxes to the price/gal.
    for example:
    North Carolina has the highest flat state tax at 35.2 cpg as well as the lowest rate for additional state and local taxes at 0.3 cpg.
    New York on the other hand has the lowest flat state tax rate at 8.1 cpg while having the highest additional taxes rate of 42.7 cpg.

    The other taxes on gasoline are raised on both a state and local level, so the state tax wasn't counted twice in the graphic. Currently, the the flat tax on gasoline across the country averages 23 cpg and the additional taxes average about 30 cpg.
    The first state tax cited in the graphic is the average of the State Flat Taxes on gasoline.

    There are more than 100 different taxes raised on a state and local levels across the country not included in the flat gasoline tax of most states. Some of the some of the taxes are charged to the wholesaler by the states and local governments and some are directly charged to the consumer at the pump.

    Those taxes range from 1cpg UST/AST Trust Fund Environmental Transport Fee, 2 cpg volume-weighted average city and county taxes, 2 cpg inspection fee, 3 cpg environmental assurance fee (for underground storage tank fund), State sales tax (often indexed to the CPI), Local sales taxes for cities and counties (sometimes based on county populations), Local option taxes and other local options taxes raised on top of the local option taxes, gross receipts earnings taxes of as much as 8% adjusted annually, 0.9% gross receipts tax for state hazardous substances cleanup fund (according to title 7:9114), State Comprehensive Enhanced Transportation System Tax, SCETS tax indexed to the CPI, Various state and environmental import taxes, environmental response taxes, surcharges paid usually on a quarterly basis, taxes in some states based on ethanol sales compared to total number of gallons of fuel sold (Iowa is one such state), excise taxes indexed to the Average Wholesaler Price, supplemental highway use taxes, Commercial carriers quarterly surtax, special fuels taxes, Coastal and Inland Water Fund taxes, Groundwater Fund, Environmental regulation fees for refined petroleum fund, other clean up fund fees, Environmental Protection Fee, Seawall tax in some locations, Agriculture Inspection fees, Transport load fees, release prevention fees, oil pollution control funds, State petroleum testing fee, taxes assessed on the general region of the state, taxes reflecting the blended rate applied to state average retail prices, franchise tax on liquid fuels, oil company franchise tax on fuels, public transportation authority taxes, tank inspection fees, special petroleum taxes, environmental assurance fees, motor fuel transportation infrastructure fee, petroleum storage tank fees, local transportation district taxes for stations located along certain transportation districts, and the list goes on and on.

    These taxes are the taxes included in "state & local" on the graphic.

    We can have the discussion on what causes "spikes" in gasoline prices, as well, but it isn't our level of taxation on oil petroleum products as the Media Matters blogger suggests.

    Seems to me that you and MediaMatters are the ones telling "Another Whopper" !






















  • tokugawa

    Posts: 945

    Mar 23, 2012 3:39 PM GMT
    shybuffguy said ... I may be wrong, but I don't think anyone at Fox represented the graphic as being to exact scale. That's just splitting hairs and nitpicking and is ridiculous. ...


    Since the $3.83 price for gas alrealy includes taxes, double counting taxes amounts to more than just nitpicking. The graph, like so much on Fox, is an intentional distortion of reality.
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    Mar 23, 2012 4:04 PM GMT
    Caviling at its best.
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    Mar 26, 2012 2:55 AM GMT
    tokugawa said
    shybuffguy said ... I may be wrong, but I don't think anyone at Fox represented the graphic as being to exact scale. That's just splitting hairs and nitpicking and is ridiculous. ...


    Since the $3.83 price for gas alrealy includes taxes, double counting taxes amounts to more than just nitpicking. The graph, like so much on Fox, is an intentional distortion of reality.



    Well no shit, the $3.83 is price for gasoline... did you think that was a math equation? The chart says it is the national average for a gallon of gasoline... Fox didn't double count the taxes either, which shybuffguy already stated. I guess you have a hard time reading... state taxes and state/local taxes are too separate categories for a reason...

    States have a flat tax rate, which differs from state to state, and the graphic shows the average of all the states in this category. Did I lose you yet? The State and Local taxes is the average amount that is on top of this flat tax rate. These taxes are used fund various projects and can be taken from the state as a whole or in specific districts across the state--hence, STATE AND LOCAL.

    For example:
    NY has a pretty low flat rate... say 15 cents per gallon
    The additional taxes taken from both the state level and from certain districts totals 50 cents per gallon..
    then there is the 18.3 cents or so taken from federal taxes...

    The graph would read:
    Federal taxes: 18.3 cents per gallon
    State taxes: 15 cents per gallon
    State and Local taxes: 50 cents per gallon
    ...

    Understand Fox's graph now? All I did is simplify Shybuffguy's post...but maybe you still won't understand...