WARNIGN! Watch these CUTE BABY BIRDS.. and you'll not look at LEGO the same way again...

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    Mar 18, 2012 4:06 PM GMT
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    Mar 18, 2012 4:14 PM GMT
    Most of those images look staged. There's no way a gull's mouth is big enough to swallow some of the things they "found" inside those birds.
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    Mar 18, 2012 4:31 PM GMT
    There'd be neither reason nor need to stage any of that. The issue is well documented.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midway_Atoll
    Midway Atoll, in common with all the Hawaiian Islands, receives substantial amounts of marine debris from the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. Consisting of ninety percent plastic, this debris accumulates on the beaches of Midway. This garbage represents a hazard to the bird population of the island. Of the 1.5 million Laysan Albatrosses that inhabit Midway, nearly all are found to have plastic in their digestive system.[21] Approximately one-third of the chicks die

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Pacific_Garbage_Patch
    The Patch is characterized by exceptionally high concentrations of pelagic plastics, chemical sludge, and other debris that have been trapped by the currents of the North Pacific Gyre.[2] Despite its size and density, the patch is not visible from satellite photography, since it consists primarily of suspended particulates in the upper water column. Since plastics break down to ever smaller polymers, concentrations of submerged particles are not visible from space, nor do they appear as a continuous debris field. Instead, the patch is defined as an area in which the mass of plastic debris in the upper water column is significantly higher than average.

    [url]http://chrisjordan.com/gallery/midway/#CF000313%2018x24[/url]
    Midway: Message from the Gyre
    (2009 - Current)
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    On Midway Atoll, a remote cluster of islands more than 2000 miles from the nearest continent, the detritus of our mass consumption surfaces in an astonishing place: inside the stomachs of thousands of dead baby albatrosses. The nesting chicks are fed lethal quantities of plastic by their parents, who mistake the floating trash for food as they forage over the vast polluted Pacific Ocean.

    For me, kneeling over their carcasses is like looking into a macabre mirror. These birds reflect back an appallingly emblematic result of the collective trance of our consumerism and runaway industrial growth. Like the albatross, we first-world humans find ourselves lacking the ability to discern anymore what is nourishing from what is toxic to our lives and our spirits. Choked to death on our waste, the mythical albatross calls upon us to recognize that our greatest challenge lies not out there, but in here.