My Boss Resigned

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    Mar 19, 2012 6:42 PM GMT
    So as the subject states, my boss resigned and this is his last week. We have an ok relationship.. Not on a very personal level, but I've always received good feedback from him and he's always given me good reviews. We joke around from time to time too.

    I'll be applying to b-school this year and I'd like his recommendation. I'd also like to keep him as a reference and ask him for career advice.. like what paths there are from my current position. Is it appropriate to ask him for his personal email and get advice about my career beyond this company we both worked for? Last week he offered to put in a good word for me with other groups in the bank if I wanted to move, so I think he's genuinely concerned. I work in finance if that makes a difference and my friends tell me it's fine, but I just wanna be sure I'm not crossing a line.
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    Mar 19, 2012 6:49 PM GMT
    being that your boss is leaving, I would venture to say that it is acceptable to ask for his personal email, being that u cannot access him through the work emails anymore...

    when I left my previous positions, ppl often asked me to "keep in touch" and asked me for my personal email...

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    Mar 19, 2012 6:59 PM GMT
    Thanks. Appreciate it. He's on linkedin too, but he may not check it often, so email seems better.

    It sucks that he's leaving coz he's a cool boss, but at the same time, it's rare to have the opportunity to get a candid assessment of your performance and potential from someone who's supervised you. I don't want to waste the opportunity.
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    Mar 19, 2012 7:06 PM GMT
    sixty_six saidThanks. Appreciate it. He's on linkedin too, but he may not check it often, so email seems better.

    It sucks that he's leaving coz he's a cool boss, but at the same time, it's rare to have the opportunity to get a candid assessment of your performance and potential from someone who's supervised you. I don't want to waste the opportunity.


    getting that information from him will prove invaluable...especially if u ever need a recommendation or a job reference... u have one right there.

    Often times, when u leave to a new position, the new supervisor will want to call references....most often ur former supervisors.
    It's good to have at least his email address....dont rely on LinkedIn...

    that way when u do need a favor from him, u can shoot him an email and hopefully get a response within 24 hours.

    good luck
  • SwimBIkeRun94...

    Posts: 480

    Mar 19, 2012 7:35 PM GMT
    Totally appropriate.

    If he's a good boss like you say, then he probably enjoys mentoring and would appreciate learning about your future accolades.

    Let him know your b-school intentions and you would enjoy working with him again in the future. Give him your information to keep in touch and ask for his.

  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Mar 19, 2012 7:40 PM GMT
    Absolutely appropriate.. explain why and ask his permission to use him as a reference. If the discussion goes along OK and I don't see why it wouldn't, I might ask if I could ask for his input on future professional decisions, if it is such that his views and opinion could be of assistance to you.
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    Mar 19, 2012 7:55 PM GMT
    I agree with everyone else that it is very appropriate to ask to keep in touch, to have his personal contact info and to ask for advice in the future. If he's a "cool boss" he'll be delighted and flattered that you want to do so.
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    Mar 19, 2012 7:57 PM GMT
    Thanks. Glad to hear it's the consensus so far. I guess if he was the type of person who'd be annoyed by this, him saying no wouldn't be a big deal since he wouldn't be worth keeping in touch with anyway.

    I really need to finally get over my shyness in the workplace. I've done well about being more aggressive in my daily work routine, but I still clam up when I'm in unfamiliar territory.
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    Mar 19, 2012 8:05 PM GMT
    Definitely ask to use him as a reference. He will likely be flattered. Everytime someone asks that of us, I'm flattered beyond belief, so I think he'll be more than willing.
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    Mar 19, 2012 8:09 PM GMT
    Absolutely appropriate. Perfect example of networking, and people often get positions helped by their networks.
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    Mar 19, 2012 8:09 PM GMT
    AMoonHawk saidYes, totally okay, ask him if he wouldn't mind writing you a personal letter of recommendation before leaving.


    I agree with this, too. I remember writing 20 letters of rec for someone when I left a previous position and I signed each one with an original, blue-ink signature.
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    Mar 19, 2012 8:18 PM GMT
    Most business schools these days though only accept online recommendations. I'd want him to write some eventually, but that won't be 'til schools are ready to receive apps. Would be better to get one now like you guys mentioned, since whatever I've accomplished is still fresh in his mind. But I wouldn't want to overwhelm him asking now and then asking again 5 months down the road.
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    Mar 19, 2012 8:22 PM GMT
    socalfitness saidAbsolutely appropriate. Perfect example of networking, and people often get positions helped by their networks.


    If there was a phobia associated with networking, I'd be patient number 1. networking events make me so nervous.
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    Mar 19, 2012 8:30 PM GMT
    Asking for a referral and to keep in touch is perfectly appropriate if you ask the way you framed it to us. Tell him you've really appreciated him as a boss and you're sorry he's leaving, but wish him good luck. Tell him you'd appreciate keeping in touch for professional advice on occasion too, and see how he reacts. I've had people I supervise ask for referrals and for advice. If they are a good employees I'm happy to do it for them.

    If he's luke-warm about you and would rather not give you a referral, he'll probably make up some excuse not to do it, as in he's too busy and not sure he's the appropriate person. If he agrees then you're good to go.

    It sounds to me like you could be a little more assertive in the workplace. But it's always better to err on the side of caution and let your work speak for itself. It sounds to me like you'd make a very good employee. Polite. Mannered. Autonomous and not always in your boss' hair, trust me that's a good thing.

    Let us know what he says...
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    Mar 19, 2012 8:33 PM GMT
    sixty_six said
    socalfitness saidAbsolutely appropriate. Perfect example of networking, and people often get positions helped by their networks.


    If there was a phobia associated with networking, I'd be patient number 1. networking events make me so nervous.


    I am uncomfortable with networking, too, but it's the name of the game. I've been a leader in the financial services industry for 15+ years now. My previous position as a Site Director exposed me to "networking events" time and again and I always felt uneasy. It gets better over time. Sometimes I did a great job faking my way through it. Other times, not so much.
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    Mar 19, 2012 8:37 PM GMT
    sixty_six said
    socalfitness saidAbsolutely appropriate. Perfect example of networking, and people often get positions helped by their networks.


    If there was a phobia associated with networking, I'd be patient number 1. networking events make me so nervous.

    Don't worry about the term, networking. Just think of having a bunch of friends and acquaintances. By all means ask him if you can use him as a reference in the future.

    As far as having things fresh in his mind in the future when you might be asking him to make a recommendation, why not create a list or summary of your accomplishments. Just keep them to yourself for now, and when you ask him later on, you can provide that list. Just casually, writing something to the effect, "Given some time has elapsed since we worked together, I thought I would provide a brief list of the things I accomplished that were significant to me."
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    Mar 19, 2012 8:39 PM GMT
    speedobuddy saidAsking for a referral and to keep in touch is perfectly appropriate if you ask the way you framed it to us. Tell him you've really appreciated him as a boss and you're sorry he's leaving, but wish him good luck. Tell him you'd appreciate keeping in touch for professional advice on occasion too, and see how he reacts. I've had people I supervise ask for referrals and for advice. If they are a good employees I'm happy to do it for them.

    If he's luke-warm about you and would rather not give you a referral, he'll probably make up some excuse not to do it, as in he's too busy and not sure he's the appropriate person. If he agrees then you're good to go.

    It sounds to me like you could be a little more assertive in the workplace. But it's always better to err on the side of caution and let your work speak for itself. It sounds to me like you'd make a very good employee. Polite. Mannered. Autonomous and not always in your boss' hair, trust me that's a good thing.

    Let us know what he says...
    ^ this, strongly!
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    Mar 19, 2012 8:41 PM GMT
    TropicalMark said
    speedobuddy saidAsking for a referral and to keep in touch is perfectly appropriate if you ask the way you framed it to us. Tell him you've really appreciated him as a boss and you're sorry he's leaving, but wish him good luck. Tell him you'd appreciate keeping in touch for professional advice on occasion too, and see how he reacts. I've had people I supervise ask for referrals and for advice. If they are a good employees I'm happy to do it for them.

    If he's luke-warm about you and would rather not give you a referral, he'll probably make up some excuse not to do it, as in he's too busy and not sure he's the appropriate person. If he agrees then you're good to go.

    It sounds to me like you could be a little more assertive in the workplace. But it's always better to err on the side of caution and let your work speak for itself. It sounds to me like you'd make a very good employee. Polite. Mannered. Autonomous and not always in your boss' hair, trust me that's a good thing.

    Let us know what he says...
    ^ this, strongly!


    Thanks Mark... I knew I liked you. icon_smile.gif
  • billy321

    Posts: 137

    Mar 19, 2012 8:49 PM GMT
    Absolutely keep in touch with him. I've supervised college summer interns who still call me for mentoring sessions. Don't be afraid to start building your network now!!!
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    Mar 19, 2012 8:51 PM GMT
    speedobuddy said
    TropicalMark said
    speedobuddy saidAsking for a referral and to keep in touch is perfectly appropriate if you ask the way you framed it to us. Tell him you've really appreciated him as a boss and you're sorry he's leaving, but wish him good luck. Tell him you'd appreciate keeping in touch for professional advice on occasion too, and see how he reacts. I've had people I supervise ask for referrals and for advice. If they are a good employees I'm happy to do it for them.

    If he's luke-warm about you and would rather not give you a referral, he'll probably make up some excuse not to do it, as in he's too busy and not sure he's the appropriate person. If he agrees then you're good to go.

    It sounds to me like you could be a little more assertive in the workplace. But it's always better to err on the side of caution and let your work speak for itself. It sounds to me like you'd make a very good employee. Polite. Mannered. Autonomous and not always in your boss' hair, trust me that's a good thing.

    Let us know what he says...
    ^ this, strongly!


    Thanks Mark... I knew I liked you. icon_smile.gif
    I call em as I see em thru experience!icon_wink.gif
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    Mar 19, 2012 9:06 PM GMT
    16616864.jpg
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    Mar 19, 2012 9:22 PM GMT
    Thanks guys! I set up some time with him today and we're gonna talk tomorrow. I really appreciate all the feedback. Wasn't expecting this many responses and this quick. You guys put Yahoo Answers to shame!

    What makes me feel uneasy about networking is that beneath the friendly faces, people kind of have another agenda. Making friends to build a network that you can leverage for other career opportunities just feels a bit off and self-serving. I'm trying to change my mindset because it's so important in my industry. I'm trying to view networking as a two way street rather than me needing something from someone. It's just that people in finance.. professors and analysts drill it down in your skull that networking gets you jobs that it's hard not to see everyone there as fake. To be fair, I have made two amazing good friends networking so far icon_smile.gif I may not have been the one who approached them, but I guess there's something to be learned here about being more aggressive.
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    Mar 19, 2012 9:43 PM GMT
    AlexanderB said16616864.jpg


    I think you have the Grindr definition of networking.
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    Mar 20, 2012 1:23 AM GMT
    sixty_six said
    AlexanderB said16616864.jpg


    I think you have the Grindr definition of networking.


    Oh I am just screwing with you icon_razz.gif Business student here...I am all about the networking. Hope it works out for you. He sounds like a good connection to have.
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    Mar 20, 2012 1:25 AM GMT
    AlexanderB said16616864.jpg
    Have the same thoughts about my old boss... was he into me or wanting to get into me...