Question for Chuckystud (but anyone can answer ;) )

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 28, 2012 9:08 PM GMT
    Sarcoplasmic hypertrophy (lifting primarily for size with some increase in strength) vs. Myofibrilular (sp?) hypertrophy (lifting primarily for strength with some added size).

    Which will raise your basal metabolic rate best?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 28, 2012 9:20 PM GMT
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 28, 2012 9:51 PM GMT
    Don't know the answer to this question, but this is the first place I look for answers to anything science-related. icon_cool.gif

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/
  • commoncoll

    Posts: 1222

    Mar 28, 2012 10:10 PM GMT
    They both sound rather dubious since muscle is not composed of independent units, rather a collections of protein fibers, sarcoplasmic reticulum, and other organelles functioning as one unit. An increase in myofibers will lead to an overall increase in sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    Theoretically, an increase in myofibers will lead to greater basal metabolic rate since more mitochondria will be needed to increase energy demand for more proteins.

    Sarcoplasms is just the fluid/space inside the cell in which organs/organelles are packed together. Increase in this space will not lead to a substantial increase in mitochondria- therefore, basal metabolic rate will not increase greatly.
    How is it possible to increase this space without introducing more fluid into it? Sounds dangerous.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 29, 2012 2:13 AM GMT
    yourname2000 saidmaxwell_smart__confused.gif


    +1

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 29, 2012 10:09 AM GMT
    fagneticspermeability saidWow, great question. Wish I could answer but I'm not sure. Oh and it's myofibrillar hypertrophy. I only know this cuz I looked it up. icon_wink.gif

    All I remember learning is that the more lean muscle tissue you have on your body the higher your basal metabolic rate will be. It will be higher because the metabolic processes and activity needed to maintain true lean muscle mass is greater than it is for adipose tissue.

    So I wonder if this is even necessary (regarding the manner in which one trains) and it it's really more of a matter of existing body composition.

    Also, certain herbs can be taken during your IF state to increase thermogenesis to increase energy expenditure and fat oxidation.

    Is this your goal? Improved fat oxidation for a leaner, tighter, sexier you? icon_cool.gif


    Sorry to jump in - but more info on said herbs, please???
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 29, 2012 10:28 AM GMT
    The bodybuilding community may lead you to believe that there is some clear difference between myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic muscle growth when they are, in fact, interrelated. Just lift. Period. Either way Muscle = Metabolism
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 29, 2012 11:21 AM GMT
    fagneticspermeability saidWow, great question. Wish I could answer but I'm not sure. Oh and it's myofibrillar hypertrophy. I only know this cuz I looked it up. icon_wink.gif

    All I remember learning is that the more lean muscle tissue you have on your body the higher your basal metabolic rate will be. It will be higher because the metabolic processes and activity needed to maintain true lean muscle mass is greater than it is for adipose tissue.

    So I wonder if this is even necessary (regarding the manner in which one trains) and it it's really more of a matter of existing body composition.

    Also, certain herbs can be taken during your IF state to increase thermogenesis to increase energy expenditure and fat oxidation.

    Is this your goal? Improved fat oxidation for a leaner, tighter, sexier you? icon_cool.gif


    Gaining lean muscle is my primary goal - though my chest and arms (the ego muscles, lol) are the last to respond to training. I'm not looking to be body-builder big (which to me would be a tad impractical), but something along the lines of a relaxed 46" chest and 16" arms.... would be nice.

    I'm following the StrongLifts 5x5 protocol for now, but at week 11/12 I'm trying to decide if I should change that up some.

    My reading thus far is that low rep/high weights stimulate myofibrillar growth, which will definitely make one stronger, but not vastly bigger.

    Denser muscles, I guess?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 29, 2012 11:34 AM GMT
    My trainer and I had this discussion yesterday. - I am no expert, so you can disregard me if you need to.

    What he has been doing with me is alternating it. Sometimes we do lower reps higher weights, then sometimes he comes up with these challenges where I use a lower rate for a lot of reps. His theory is that shocking your muscles will also help stimulate growth.

    Just going by what he was telling me.

    I tend to do better with the higher rep lower weights. In fact, I can usually win those competitions.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 29, 2012 11:59 AM GMT
    Getting laid is always the answericon_exclaim.gif
  • commoncoll

    Posts: 1222

    Mar 29, 2012 2:57 PM GMT
    onaquest said
    fagneticspermeability saidWow, great question. Wish I could answer but I'm not sure. Oh and it's myofibrillar hypertrophy. I only know this cuz I looked it up. icon_wink.gif

    All I remember learning is that the more lean muscle tissue you have on your body the higher your basal metabolic rate will be. It will be higher because the metabolic processes and activity needed to maintain true lean muscle mass is greater than it is for adipose tissue.

    So I wonder if this is even necessary (regarding the manner in which one trains) and it it's really more of a matter of existing body composition.

    Also, certain herbs can be taken during your IF state to increase thermogenesis to increase energy expenditure and fat oxidation.

    Is this your goal? Improved fat oxidation for a leaner, tighter, sexier you? icon_cool.gif


    Sorry to jump in - but more info on said herbs, please???

    Onaquest, some oxidation decouplers will increase body temperature and increase fat oxidation without production in more energy. 2,4-dinitrophenol is a common supplement along with thyroid hormones-not herbs. These can be dangerous for liver and gall bladder and other organs, they can also cause problems in diabetics and hypertensive folks.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 29, 2012 11:33 PM GMT
    yourname2000 saidmaxwell_smart__confused.gif

    +2

    ....BLUE!