Where do you stand on "NET NEUTRALITY" ?

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    Mar 31, 2012 3:36 AM GMT

    This from Change.org

    Elena Tchijov has built her life around cell phones. She depends on her smartphone to read the paper, check Facebook and get driving directions.

    She even started a small business creating mobile apps like "Map Pocket", which lets you save maps onto your phone so you can see them when you don't have a wireless or data connection -- vital for traveling in areas with spotty reception. In her own words, "We are a small company trying to do big things."

    But the success of Elena's company, and the freedom to use her phone as she wants, depends on big cell phone companies keeping the Internet free and fair. In shareholder meetings in April, Verizon, AT&T and Sprint may decide to give an unfair advantage to companies willing to pay big bucks by speeding up connections to paying companies' websites, while other sites like Leaping Byte's (as a scrappy small business) open slowly -- or not at all.

    So Elena started a petition on Change.org telling Verizon, AT&T and Sprint to keep the Internet free and equal for customers and small business owners. Click here to sign Elena's petition now.

    Right now, internet service providers maintain the same speed connections for all websites and apps by default. But in the next few weeks, shareholders of the big cell phone companies will vote on "Network Neutrality" resolutions -- official policies that would commit companies to keeping the Internet free and fair. Without these policies, nothing would keep internet providers from giving companies with deeper pockets preferential treatment, crippling small businesses like Elena's.

    Up until the votes, shareholders will be hearing arguments from both sides -- including from company executives on why unequal internet could make shareholders rich. But if every AT&T, Verizon and Sprint customer tells his or her service provider to officially adopt Network Neutrality, the companies -- and their shareholders -- will have to listen.

    Click here to sign Elena's petition telling AT&T, Verizon and Sprint to keep the Internet free and fair.

    Thanks for being a change-maker,
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Everytime we think we've won this war over control of the internet along comes another challenge from the big money interests. I think its for our own good to fight for Net Neutrality.
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    Mar 31, 2012 4:23 AM GMT
    realifedad saidClick here to sign Elena's petition telling AT&T, Verizon and Sprint to keep the Internet free and fair.

    Thanks for being a change-maker,
    Thanks for the link. icon_lol.gif
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    Mar 31, 2012 5:07 AM GMT
    paulflexes said
    realifedad saidClick here to sign Elena's petition telling AT&T, Verizon and Sprint to keep the Internet free and fair.

    Thanks for being a change-maker,
    Thanks for the link. icon_lol.gif





    OOPS !!! guess we'll have to 'improvise' where the link is concerned, I cannot seem to make it 'clickable', anyone care to do that for us ?
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    Apr 01, 2012 6:32 PM GMT
    http://www.change.org/petitions/at-t-sprint-and-verizon-protect-consumer-choice-on-the-internet
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    Apr 01, 2012 6:52 PM GMT
    It is true that some corporations probably have extra-market power to control aspects of the Internet, as the result of state interventions such as IP, FCC licensing, antitrust law, big business favoritism, and so on. But the solution is not to grant the state even more power to regulate private companies.This is the criminal gang that has fouled things up in the first place.

    Net neutrality is an attempt by the state to see more power to control private property rights as an ostensible response to various “market failures” that are really themselves caused by state intervention. In this, it is anohter example of the state’s creating a crisis and using this as a justification to seize more power under the pretense of saving the people from the crisis that it caused.


    http://blog.mises.org/15068/against-net-neutrality/