Backpacking

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 04, 2012 1:45 PM GMT
    How long of a trip do you usually like to go for?
    What type of food do you usually bring? Pre-packaged store bought, Freeze Dried, back and go?
    Do you like to solo, small group, or large group?
    And what is your dream hike? Or have you already accomplished it

    I typically aim for 1-2 nights, only because that is all my schedule allows for. Especially when it comes to trying to find a hiking partner to go with >.< none of my friends seem to be the trek for days type people. I like to pre package my own food and cook gourmet meals. It's a little extra weight, but I love to cook on site. As for dream location? I would have to say Denali or New Zealand
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    Apr 04, 2012 2:21 PM GMT
    I buy store food, usually the 'envelope' foods, what ever you add boiling water to. Oatmeal for breakfast, and tortillas w/ hummus and/or peanut butter w/gorp (Good Ole Raisins & Peanuts) for lunch. jerky.
    I will be out on the trail, as long as possible. My dream hike was the Appalachian Trail (AT) and I did thru hike that a few years ago !!
    Since then, I have traveled many places for hiking/camping.
    Step off the plane, put on my backpack and stick out my thumb !!
    My favorite place has been Hawaii !!!! There are 13 different types of climate in the World and Hawaii has 11 of them !! Diversity is awesome !!
    Happy Trails !!
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    Apr 04, 2012 2:22 PM GMT
    for the best camping bring a little green...
  • Latenight30

    Posts: 1525

    Apr 04, 2012 2:30 PM GMT
    usually 2-3 nights unless you can find services and water.
    Food is pre-packaged for Jet Boils.
    I like to go with someone just for the company. Will be doing a camping/climbing trip soon.
    My Partner wants to take time off and do the AT sometime.
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    Apr 04, 2012 10:58 PM GMT
    Backpacking? I loved it! I did it solo.

    But when you say 1-2 nights, I'm not sure whether you mean home to home or the average duration of your stop along the trail.

    I had a preference for backpackers hostels over tents. My experience taught me that members kitchens doubles up as a social hub. Nothing can kick-start a conversation quicker than walking into the kitchen with a load of raw stuff and starting up the cooker - often with a degree of difficulty as the pilot spark fails to ignite the gas - next to the person who is halfway through cooking his meal at the very next stove.

    I hosteled both in the UK (my home country) and abroad. UK hikes included the Lake District, Cumbria, from Kendal to Keswick, taking about three to four days to complete. Also the Hadrians Wall Hike, from Carlisle to Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, also four days.

    Two other hikes completed abroad includes the Grand Canyon - two days - and the Manhattan Broadway Hike, from Harlem to Battery Park, one day.

    But my longest continuous backpacking vacation has taken me ten weeks to complete, which was also the longest duration away from home (other than living in the Middle East for 15 weeks in 1994). This included hosteling in Singapore (5 days), Australia (6 weeks) and California, (3 weeks), in 1997.

    This was two years after backpacking the whole of the USA for one month in 1995.

    In all these trips I stayed at hostels, average duration about three nights, before moving on to my next destination. My longest stay at an American hostel was for ten nights at HI-AYHA San Diego Downtown in 1997, followed by nine nights at the HI-AHYA New York city, the largest backpackers hostel in the world, in 1998.

    All foodstuffs were bought at a nearby superstore, always one near a hostel where ever the destination.

    It was all great fun.
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    May 24, 2012 4:35 AM GMT
    I usually go out for about 3-5 days if I am bringing my own food/water. I tend to bring food that is light and can be heated with water (I use the Jet Boil), which includes pre-packaged food and oatmeal. The rest of my food I tend to bring is trail mix, jerky and peanut butter. Also, pack some energy bars.

    For me, I like to go solo or with one other person. Beyond that, you have to watch your pace unless everyone is at the same fitness level. Regular camping is best for large groups. The Appalachian is a nice trail, I hope to finish it one day and I agree that New Zealand is my #1 dream destination. I want to take a few weeks off work and do some adventure travel over there.
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    Jun 26, 2012 3:17 AM GMT
    Haven't done this in too long.

    Have gone on some extensive hikes in the Sinai desert (from the shores of the Red Sea to Santa Katarina at the base of Mt Sinai) as well as camel trips. Will probably do a brief excursion in the Negev desert later this year. Sticking with the desert motif, have also hiked in the Dead Sea area (Ein Gedi to Sodom). Also in northern Israel, on Mt Carmel and Mt Dov (sometimes called Sheba Farms).

    Have also hiked Mt Marcy (Adirondacks) and some day trips in Hawaii.
    Would love to get back to Yosemite....
  • GWriter

    Posts: 1446

    Jun 26, 2012 3:22 AM GMT
    SMedd saidI usually go out for about 3-5 days if I am bringing my own food/water. I tend to bring food that is light and can be heated with water (I use the Jet Boil), which includes pre-packaged food and oatmeal. The rest of my food I tend to bring is trail mix, jerky and peanut butter. Also, pack some energy bars.

    For me, I like to go solo or with one other person. Beyond that, you have to watch your pace unless everyone is at the same fitness level. Regular camping is best for large groups. The Appalachian is a nice trail, I hope to finish it one day and I agree that New Zealand is my #1 dream destination. I want to take a few weeks off work and do some adventure travel over there.

    5 days! That is some relatively serious back-country camping. Do you mean you park, carry your food and supplies for 4 nights, and don't come back to civilization until five days later? That is some lean packing.
  • Neon_Dreams

    Posts: 352

    Jun 26, 2012 3:29 AM GMT
    I camped in CO and UT last week and it was fun. It was my first time and I did it solo. The stars were beautiful and I did a 2 hour hike in Zion. I am a little sick right now, so I didn't want to push my body at all. But, after I get over tonsillitis and I'm off antibiotics, I will easily hike 6+ hours per day (assuming no extreme heat) and find one nice place to camp, per trip.


    Joe
  • califun869

    Posts: 54

    Jun 26, 2012 3:42 AM GMT
    I go for 2-3 days. Been doing trips in northern california checking out the local territory here. I normally eat peanut butter and tortilla and freeze dried fruit wraps, chicken/turkey wraps, and whatever those just add hot water dinner things are. I don't have a dream hike per se, but I want to do the camino de santiago in spain. I saw it in a movie it looks sweet.
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    Jul 03, 2012 1:09 PM GMT
    2-3 days is ideal I think. I've only done it in Colorado, but it's amazingly gorgeous there pretty much wherever you want to go.

    I would say I had my ideal hike already! I went up to Lake Walden with a buddy of mine. For those that haven't been there, it's a lake that's surrounded on 3 sides by mountains, so it's secluded yet large enough to allow for big groups. It's a short 2ish mile hike in. It was in mid September and it snowed on us while we were there...so amazing!

    I want to make another trip sometime in the next year back to Colorado and go some more...any takers?
  • jock_n_ca

    Posts: 148

    Jul 14, 2012 9:35 PM GMT
    2-3 nites. I bring a variety of food although dried banana chips are verboten. When I was a kid my parents brought those along EVERY TRIP and since then can't stand em. Dream Hike? Somewhere in the Alps although I don't know how to yodel...
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    Jul 17, 2012 2:22 AM GMT
    CutieJasp saidfor the best camping bring a little green...
    A man after my own heart.

    Let's go camping! icon_biggrin.gif
  • vermontsober

    Posts: 1

    Aug 12, 2012 1:17 PM GMT
    anybody want to backpack all or part of the long trail in vermont? also want to do some overnights in the white mtns in new hampshire to finish the 4000 footers (bonds, owls head, carters maybe).

    thinking of segmenting the long trail in order to do the AT in vermont which is the first 104 miles of the LT from the south and then cutting east for hanover, nh.
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    Dec 03, 2012 6:50 AM GMT
    I'm a pretty avid backpacker and generally make time for several trips throughout the year. I kicked it off this spring on a solo trip in Zion National Park, which was one of the most otherworldly places I've ever seen, then did a few quick weekenders, climbed Mount Shasta as a backpack, then rounded out the season with a 5-day trip in the Evolution Basin in the Sierra.

    5 days seems to be about the right length for me, but I'm certainly not beyond dashing off for a wilderness fix over the weekend. I'll go either solo or with a friend, though solo trips can feel rather creepy if you're not on a well-established route...Yeah if I fall from this sketchy trail, no one will find me for weeks

    For food, I'll generally bring food that absorbs a lot of water, or is otherwise calorically dense. Breakfast is oatmeal (water boiled on a WhisperLite stove), lunch usually tortillas with peanut butter or tuna, and dinner cous cous, instant black beans. Trail mix is a must, and I also like to have some jerky, dark chocolate, and whisky.

    My best trip ever was a five-day excursion into Kings Canyon and Sequoia National Parks. I haven't thought much about dream trips, but sometime in the near future I'd like to hit up:
    - Glacier and Banff National Parks
    - Yosemite (I did a short trip here and have driven through many times, but would like to absorb myself into it).
    - Hawaii

    GWriter5 days! That is some relatively serious back-country camping. Do you mean you park, carry your food and supplies for 4 nights, and don't come back to civilization until five days later? That is some lean packing.


    That's exactly what he means icon_smile.gif And it is the way to do it.

    Who wants to come with? icon_biggrin.gif
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    Dec 03, 2012 7:18 PM GMT
    I can hardly ever get away for more than two nights now. Used to do 5-7 days every summer, before jobs and bills came along. A few times, I've been on 14-day hikes, down the Pacific Crest Trail, but with a food cache or supply rendezvous half-way.

    These days, all of the marked trails within a day's drive of Seattle or Portland are so saturated that you might as well go for a walk downtown. Unless you go in the rainy season or maybe mid-week in the spring or fall.
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    Dec 03, 2012 7:35 PM GMT
    if we're talking ideal situation, i'd like to go for about a week to ten days. i prefer to pack my own food and eat pretty well even though it means more weight to carry.

    as for locations, i like your list a lot. i've been up denali and don't think i'd go again even though it was absolutely fantastic. new zealand is paradise. i went to christchurch and couldn't get enough; however, i missed the milford track.

    captain cook, who saw most of the world, called it the most beautiful place on earth...i'd have to agree. would love to see it.

    IMG_0835.jpgMilford-Track1.jpg
  • mr_bijae

    Posts: 229

    Dec 03, 2012 7:44 PM GMT
    Pacific Coast Trail, between Yosemite and Lake Tahoe. Loved going up there every summer. My best hiking companion is my dog. They are always ready for the adventure, never bail at the last minute and even carry their own food without issue. I take a lot of fresh fruit and a fishing pole. I will take ramen and oatmeal for backup if the fish aren't biting. I would go up there for three or four days at a time, just drop in the trail and hike south, or north for a couple days, then hike back. Lately I've only been doing day hikes, 13 milers with no overnight. This thread makes me want to get back out there and do it though!
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    Dec 04, 2012 3:26 AM GMT
    imasrxd saidif we're talking ideal situation, i'd like to go for about a week to ten days. i prefer to pack my own food and eat pretty well even though it means more weight to carry.

    as for locations, i like your list a lot. i've been up denali and don't think i'd go again even though it was absolutely fantastic. new zealand is paradise. i went to christchurch and couldn't get enough; however, i missed the milford track.

    captain cook, who saw most of the world, called it the most beautiful place on earth...i'd have to agree. would love to see it.

    IMG_0835.jpgMilford-Track1.jpg


    Sold. So, when you wanna go? icon_smile.gif

    Actually, I am curious about Denali. I've been looking at how people have prepared and was a little bit baffled by what appeared to be an extremely conservative acclimation schedule. i.e, hike to 7000 feet one day, then 8500 feet, then 9500 feet, etc. I've been up past 14,000 a few times and have never had any issues with altitude. And realistically, I think it's fair to assume I'm probably in better backpacking shape than most people who make the trek.

    So is that conservative a schedule really necessary? Seems like it could make the trip take an unmanageably long amount of time, and I'm pretty sure that the first mountaineers weren't quite so cautious. I mean, I live at sea level, but visited my sister in Aspen and went on a 14-mile run at 9000 feet a few hours after getting off the plane. It seems that least a few of those intermediary steps could be skipped.

    Or maybe not - thought it might be good to hear from someone who's done it.
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    Dec 04, 2012 3:32 AM GMT
    CFL_Oakland said

    Sold. So, when you wanna go? icon_smile.gif

    Actually, I am curious about Denali. I've been looking at how people have prepared and was a little bit baffled by what appeared to be an extremely conservative acclimation schedule. i.e, hike to 7000 feet one day, then 8500 feet, then 9500 feet, etc. I've been up past 14,000 a few times and have never had any issues with altitude. And realistically, I think it's fair to assume I'm probably in better backpacking shape than most people who make the trek.

    So is that conservative a schedule really necessary? Seems like it could make the trip take an unmanageably long amount of time, and I'm pretty sure that the first mountaineers weren't quite so cautious. I mean, I live at sea level, but visited my sister in Aspen and went on a 14-mile run at 9000 feet a few hours after getting off the plane. It seems that least a few of those intermediary steps could be skipped.

    Or maybe not - thought it might be good to hear from someone who's done it.

    first of all, i'm ready anytime. just let me know when we're going.

    as for denali, there is a huge difference between 9,000ft and 20,000ft. i did the NW side, which takes a lot longer since you have to kick your own route and double carry (food one day and camp the next). we were on the mountain almost thirty days. you wind up climbing pretty slowly all the way up to a little ove 16,000ft. we sat for three days at our high camp waiting for good weather. when we made the push for the summit, i definitely experienced altitude issues. lots of disorientation and difficulty telling if i was hot or cold. was fine as soon as we came down but it's a different beast, for sure.
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    Dec 04, 2012 6:24 PM GMT
    Have gone mostly to the Sierras summer, after the snow has melted in the passes. Favorite trips have been 4-7 days - to Kings Canyon and Emigrant Wilderness - when I have been able to get away for that long. Pack both freeze dried and some fresh food - one of life's great simple pleasures is eating fresh strawberries on an open mountainside. I tend to hike solo, but that is mostly because my partner is not into backpacking, and these days are have no one else to go with. I would not hike with a large group.
  • dbj404

    Posts: 21

    Dec 06, 2012 6:29 PM GMT
    I like to backpack either solo or in small groups. I usually go between 2-5 days. I bring as little as possible. i really only bring ready made food such as nut and granola bars. I'm not a big guy, so a light pack makes the trip more enjoyable for me. I love hiking in Alaska. My dream backpacking trip would be to go down to Patagonia in Argentina. It looks amazing!

  • FL180

    Posts: 75

    Dec 06, 2012 6:50 PM GMT
    There are some awesome places in California to overnight I am discovering. I recently went to the Trinity Alps, AMAZING!

    It's hard to find willing people to go, so sometimes I just solo.

    Next plan is to Mt. Shasta and the Sierras.

    My dream hiking trip would definitely be NZ and Argentinean areas!

    Mt Shasta:
    Mt.-Shasta.jpg

    Sorry the picture is too big, not sure how to fix that. :/
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    Dec 06, 2012 7:43 PM GMT
    There are tons of amazing places all over California. Enough for a lifetime, it seems. You're in Monterey? We can make that work...

    Have fun on Shasta. It was the mountain I climbed to confront my fear of hiking on snow. Trinity Alps are definitely on my list.
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    Dec 12, 2012 5:05 PM GMT
    Hadn't ever seen anyone else on RJ ( or any other gay site) into canoeing. One of my most memorable trips - quite a few years ago, when I lived in Iowa- was in Ontario, north of Grand Marais Minnesota. Went through Canadian customs via canoe at Saganaga Lake and went north from there for a week. No passport needed back then. Just went from 1 like to another, often catching fish for dinner. Saw a lynx, lots of loons, had a moose swim right by camp, and did not see any other people for days at a time. Have been tempted to do this again, but can't see driving 2000 miles to get to a jump off point or leaving a rental car for a week in the middle of nowhere. Also, the wilderness custom stations are no more, so everyone in your party has to apply for a Canadian entrance permit months in advance.