New Computer with 3.4GHz AMD FX-8100 Eight-Core. Any opinions?

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    Apr 04, 2012 11:26 PM GMT
    For general business use with quite a bit of vid work, mostly LR, AE, and some PS. No gaming. Commercial Real estate primarily.

    [url]http://www.shopping.hp.com/product/rts_desktop/rts_desktop/1/storefronts/QW694AA%2523ABA[/url]

    Btw, no, a Mac will not happen.
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    Apr 04, 2012 11:52 PM GMT
    southbeach1500 saidMeh.... I prefer Intel over AMD.


    Yeah, That's one of my concerns. I'm not sure exactly why, but I'm biased toward Intel
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    Apr 05, 2012 12:21 AM GMT
    yourname2000 said^^^ Wut??

    Fast is fast. Who cares how it gets there.

    My concerns would be:

    it's an HP.
    it has very little storage.
    is it slowed down (processor speed-wise) so that the 8 cores work harmoniously.
    do you do things that use programs that are optimized to use 8 cores.
    and
    it's an HP.

    But it's damn cheap.


    2TB should be enough for me until I get around to the next replacement. However, I can only go to 16gb ram.

    I use several Adobe product with Acrobat Pro, Lightroom, After Effects and Photoshop for both play and work. I'm also waiting for the Canon T4i so new toys will get me doing more photography and video work.

    I've had many HP products over the years and I'm not unhappy.
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    Apr 05, 2012 1:25 AM GMT
    You really won't find much difference between Intel and AMD, even with the applications that you are running.

    Your applications don't seem to be among those that will spawn processes on multiple cores, most likely, but you should have no problem with what you are planning to run, and running several at once (your OS will spread their processes over whatever cores you have available).
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    Apr 05, 2012 1:51 AM GMT
    You really don't need an 8 core CPU for Facebook and Solitaire. icon_lol.gif

    But seriously, I would avoid the Pavilion series. That's the common consumer line. Shit breaks down. Plus, I have no idea why they would offer a slow 5400 RPM hard drive on such a high spec machine.

    Pay more for the Pro series, get an Intel CPU, and a faster hard drive. And I think you get a better warranty. Besides, most current software can't effectively utilize all 8 cores. For photo and video editing, you're better off loading up on RAM and a decent video card for GPU acceleration.
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    Apr 05, 2012 2:00 AM GMT
    xrichx saidYou really don't need an 8 core CPU for Facebook and Solitaire. icon_lol.gif

    But seriously, I would avoid the Pavilion series. That's the common consumer line. Shit breaks down. Plus, I have no idea why they would offer a slow 5400 RPM hard drive on such a high spec machine.

    Pay more for the Pro series, get an Intel CPU, and a faster hard drive. And I think you get a better warranty. Besides, most current software can't effectively utilize all 8 cores. For photo and video editing, you're better off loading up on RAM and a decent video card for GPU acceleration.


    that's another strange issue that I noticed. Yeah, I need to look around a bit more.
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    Apr 05, 2012 2:17 AM GMT
    You're doing some video editing work? Go with Intel. Get either a higher-end i5 or a lower end i7. Do some research. If you aren't going to do much video work, get one of the chips without the integrated graphics (although, really, this only saves you about $50 max).

    Get RAM. Lots of RAM. Lots of *fast* RAM. This will benefit *everything* your computer does.

    If you want things to be very snappy get a solid state drive as your primary drive, and a beefy storage drive as your secondary.

    Also, is there any reason why a Mac won't happen? I'm a PC guy, but after forcing myself to use a Mac at work... I've gotta say that I really prefer OSX over anything I've used on a PC. Plus that Magic Mouse coupled with gestures is brilliant.
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    Apr 05, 2012 3:51 AM GMT
    southbeach1500 said
    freedomisntfree said
    southbeach1500 saidMeh.... I prefer Intel over AMD.


    Yeah, That's one of my concerns. I'm not sure exactly why, but I'm biased toward Intel


    AMD has to "translate" from x86 compiled code to AMD code. Why bother with a middle man? Stick with Intel!


    That's rarely true. The x86 instruction set in standardized, and in low and mid price range processors, AMD runs circles around Intel. Only just recently has Intel surpassed AMD in speed on the x86 instruction set. AMDs microcode and architecture are different than Intel with what were brilliant ideas at the time. The processing chip isn't just a CPU these days, but a data center on a chip. Things like bus speeds, widths, and clocks, all make for faster crunching, but, by far, the slow downs happen with mechanical parts such as hard drives.

    AMD adds to the 86 instruction set with its 3D NOW technology.

    AMD architecture and microcode is typically up to 40% faster throughput, in all but the very latest, top of the line, processing chips.

    AMD offers considerably more value and speed at low and medium price points.

    The past year, or two, Intel high end processors have gained speed for what was held for over a decade by AMD. AMD is slated to take the lead again this fall.

    RAM is important, and drive RPM is important if you are unloading and loading stuff. Raw CPU speed is important if you are doing lots of computation, and you'll want a CPU that uses the full width of the bus with plenty of caching. Gaming means CPU, a high end video card, and a fast drive (7200 RPM or faster) to really keep things going.

    Unless you are running lots of calculation intensive, multi-threaded apps, more cores doesn't get you much in terms of speed. The slow downs happen with the IO subsystem (input / output). CPU clocks are so fast these days that unless you are doing intense multimedia, or heavy duty database scans, or high end math, they can more than keep up.

    MACS are very cool, and run the exceptionally stable and thrifty BSD / MACH / Darwin / NEXT kernel / subsystems but Windows still brings many, many, many more apps.
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    Apr 05, 2012 4:08 AM GMT
    One thing the HP has going for it is the DDR3 memory..although you'd probably take advantage of more than that (up to 4GB with 32bit OS) The price is pretty good compared to a custom-built machine I usually seek out. The thing to keep in mind is faster storage is not on most wish lists. But, it can be added.


    The thing about video editing is you are moving a large amount of data around.

    Here's something worth digging for: I believe a machine based on Intel's new SandyBridge will be your best investment as Intel moves the DDR controller onto the Pentium chip for even faster memory access. It is the only chip package with 2,011 pins. 32nm technology. The Intel Core i7-3820 is the low-end of three chips with 10mb of L3 cache, 4x256kb of L2 cache. The high-end version of this sells for over $1,000 for just the chip.

    If you're adding a flash drive, you might benefit from a PCI card instead of a SATA drive. SATA might be a bottleneck. http://www.ocztechnology.com/products/solid_state_drives/pci-e_solid_state_drives

    Your video files are probably huge. So, you might consider an average-sized flash hard drive and adding a SATA-3 hard drive with a 10K rpm spindle speed to render with.

    Speed sometimes shortens the lifespan of such devices so you find them more common on commercial systems where they use RAID controllers to mirror the data across more than one drive to prevent loss. But, the speed gains might be important. There is a standard for 15K RPM hard drives, but those tend to demand RAID to deal with their reliability risk.

    My work machine has 2-drive Raid mirroring from Intel built into the Motherboard. I intend to have it on my next home machine.

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    Apr 05, 2012 4:32 AM GMT
    GwgTrunks saidYou're doing some video editing work? Go with Intel. Get either a higher-end i5 or a lower end i7. Do some research. If you aren't going to do much video work, get one of the chips without the integrated graphics (although, really, this only saves you about $50 max).

    Get RAM. Lots of RAM. Lots of *fast* RAM. This will benefit *everything* your computer does.

    If you want things to be very snappy get a solid state drive as your primary drive, and a beefy storage drive as your secondary.

    Also, is there any reason why a Mac won't happen? I'm a PC guy, but after forcing myself to use a Mac at work... I've gotta say that I really prefer OSX over anything I've used on a PC. Plus that Magic Mouse coupled with gestures is brilliant.


    Buying a Mac would be tantamount to me voting for a democrat or buying a japanese car. There just are certain things that will never happen and buying a Mac is one of them.

    And the one I was looking at is only expandable to 16 gb. Yeah, I'd better keep looking. I didn't do much with vid three or so years ago, but that's sure changed.
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    Apr 05, 2012 4:36 AM GMT
    chuckystud said
    southbeach1500 said
    freedomisntfree said
    southbeach1500 saidMeh.... I prefer Intel over AMD.


    Yeah, That's one of my concerns. I'm not sure exactly why, but I'm biased toward Intel


    AMD has to "translate" from x86 compiled code to AMD code. Why bother with a middle man? Stick with Intel!


    That's rarely true. The x86 instruction set in standardized, and in low and mid price range processors, AMD runs circles around Intel. Only just recently has Intel surpassed AMD in speed on the x86 instruction set. AMDs microcode and architecture are different than Intel with what were brilliant ideas at the time. The processing chip isn't just a CPU these days, but a data center on a chip. Things like bus speeds, widths, and clocks, all make for faster crunching, but, by far, the slow downs happen with mechanical parts such as hard drives.

    AMD adds to the 86 instruction set with its 3D NOW technology.

    AMD architecture and microcode is typically up to 40% faster throughput, in all but the very latest, top of the line, processing chips.

    AMD offers considerably more value and speed at low and medium price points.

    The past year, or two, Intel high end processors have gained speed for what was held for over a decade by AMD. AMD is slated to take the lead again this fall.

    RAM is important, and drive RPM is important if you are unloading and loading stuff. Raw CPU speed is important if you are doing lots of computation, and you'll want a CPU that uses the full width of the bus with plenty of caching. Gaming means CPU, a high end video card, and a fast drive (7200 RPM or faster) to really keep things going.

    Unless you are running lots of calculation intensive, multi-threaded apps, more cores doesn't get you much in terms of speed. The slow downs happen with the IO subsystem (input / output). CPU clocks are so fast these days that unless you are doing intense multimedia, or heavy duty database scans, or high end math, they can more than keep up.

    MACS are very cool, and run the exceptionally stable and thrifty BSD / MACH / Darwin / NEXT kernel / subsystems but Windows still brings many, many, many more apps.


    I don't do any gaming ... never have.

    And there's some of my commercial real estate stuff that I use a lot that's PC only.
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    Apr 05, 2012 4:41 AM GMT
    Thanks guys for all of your suggestions. Due to the massive downturn in the commercial RE market over the last three or four years, I didn't replace like I used to every 2 1/2 to 3 years and I'm running a really old, although upgraded several times, machine. It's likely that just about anything will be a huge improvement.
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    Apr 05, 2012 8:44 PM GMT
    ARM is the future.
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    Apr 05, 2012 9:03 PM GMT
    ARM can mean the old, antiquated, RISC architecture. I assume you are referring to ARM Holdings, the manufacturer. Time will tell.
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    Apr 05, 2012 11:41 PM GMT
    Microcenter has a home brand called Powerspec G180 and that's what I'm looking at now with an Intel i7 2600k unlocked on a Intel DZ68DB mother board and a 64gb solid state drive and then 2TB of HD. and a ATI Radeon 6670