Gross Additives in Everyday Foods

  • metta

    Posts: 39167

    Apr 06, 2012 4:31 PM GMT

    Gross Additives in Everyday Foods

    -ammonia-cleansed pink slime meat

    -Starbucks recently came under fire from the vegan community for admitting that the red dyes used in their strawberry drinks contained cochineal, a coloring made from crushed parasitic beetles.

    -Glyphosate is the active chemical ingredient in the notorious weed killer, Roundup. This chemical is so heavily used at this point that it's now detected in soil, air, bodies of water and rain - meaning, at this point, escape is dubious, even if you eat mostly organic.

    -Castoreum extract doesn't sound too scary, but it's actually a bitter, orange-brown substance retrieved from the beaver's anal gland. Yum. This additive can be found in many processed food products that are flavored vanilla or raspberry, like ice cream, yogurt, cookies and the like

    -Shellac is what makes jelly beans shiny and gives that lacquered finish to other sweet treats along with fruit and coffee beans as well, and it's all thanks to excretions of the Kerria lacca insect.

    -Bugs & Rodent Hair. Most of us weren't pleased to hear that the FDA decided to keep BPA in the food supply. However, if they're fans of BPA, what else do you think the FDA allows in food before taking action? The answer - quite a lot. The FDA's Defect Levels Handbook shows that an average of 30 or more insect fragments and 1 or more rodent hairs per 100 grams of peanut butter, a kid staple, is allowed, before any action is taken. An average of 60 or more aphids and/or thrips and/or mites per 100 grams of frozen broccoli is allowed while 5 or more fly eggs and 1 or more maggots per 100 grams of tomato juice is okay.

    -Flame Retardant. Brominated vegetable oil, or BVO, was first used to keep plastics from catching on fire and it's patented as a flame retardant, which obviously makes it the perfect additive for sports drinks and sodas right? I mean we wouldn't want you bursting into flames during a jog. Although BVO contains questionable chemicals and it's banned in food products in Europe and Japan, American companies add it with glee to various sodas, juices and sports drinks. BVO helps to keep the artificial flavors from separating from the rest of the liquid, but is sorely under-researched. In fact, Environmental Health News notes that BVO FDA limits are based on outdated data from the 1970s, and scientists say the chemical deserves another look as it's been linked to bromide poisoning symptoms like skin lesions, memory loss, nerve disorders and some research suggests that BVO builds up in human tissues, just like other flame retardants. In big doses, BVO may be very bad, as some rodent studies show that large amounts result in reproductive and behavioral problems.


    http://www.inhabitots.com/gross-food-additives/
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 06, 2012 4:40 PM GMT
    This is why I only shop at Whole Foods Markets.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 06, 2012 4:41 PM GMT
    Some of these are harmless. There's bug detritus in and on just about everything you come in contact with, including in the air you breathe.

    Never bought into the hoopla about Glyphosphate or pesticides in general. They might contribute to disease in some people, but banning them would -- in the short-term anyway -- lead to immediate and widespread famine and starvation. The long-term solution is a gradual switch to sustainable, local-grow produce. There's promising developments on that end -- like the rooftop greenhouses in Brooklyn -- but it's going to take a while for that sort of thing to become ubiquitous.

    The only one that really bothers me is BVO, but then again, that's why I avoid bubbly-chemical-in-a-can (soda) anyway unless it's natural and flavored with cane juice.
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Apr 06, 2012 10:04 PM GMT
    you make beaver anal gland secretion sound like a bad thing
  • okcomputer201...

    Posts: 132

    Apr 06, 2012 10:12 PM GMT
    You forgot to mention gelatin! Gelatin is made from pig skin, bones, and connective tissue. Yummmmm
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 06, 2012 10:19 PM GMT
    Oh well. I had peanut butter today and I'll have peanut butter tomorrow, with bug parts and rat hair. It's not going to hurt me and is almost impossible to completely remove in agricultural products.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 06, 2012 11:07 PM GMT
    How do the food companies find these products??? "Oh, I'm gonna search a beavers ass for a way to flavour this ice cream..."
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 06, 2012 11:13 PM GMT
    pat33rob saidHow do the food companies find these products??? "Oh, I'm gonna search a beavers ass for a way to flavour this ice cream..."


    LOL. I was thinking the same thing. Apparently, there are reports refuting the use of Castoreum in food products. But it's main use is in perfumes. You always wonder how "discoveries" of these sort come about. My guess would be that beaver pelts were used and sold to make various products, and the glands were left to dry out and someone discovered that "aroma".
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 26, 2013 11:46 PM GMT
    metta8 said
    Gross Additives in Everyday Foods

    -Flame Retardant. Brominated vegetable oil, or BVO, was first used to keep plastics from catching on fire and it's patented as a flame retardant, which obviously makes it the perfect additive for sports drinks and sodas right? I mean we wouldn't want you bursting into flames during a jog. Although BVO contains questionable chemicals and it's banned in food products in Europe and Japan, American companies add it with glee to various sodas, juices and sports drinks. BVO helps to keep the artificial flavors from separating from the rest of the liquid, but is sorely under-researched. In fact, Environmental Health News notes that BVO FDA limits are based on outdated data from the 1970s, and scientists say the chemical deserves another look as it's been linked to bromide poisoning symptoms like skin lesions, memory loss, nerve disorders and some research suggests that BVO builds up in human tissues, just like other flame retardants. In big doses, BVO may be very bad, as some rodent studies show that large amounts result in reproductive and behavioral problems.


    http://www.inhabitots.com/gross-food-additives/



    Gatorade bows to pressure to remove BVO


    http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2013-01-25/sports/chi-pepsico-to-take-controversial-ingredient-out-of-gatorade-20130125_1_bvo-sarah-kavanagh-gatorade
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 27, 2013 4:25 AM GMT
    ECnAZ said
    pat33rob saidHow do the food companies find these products??? "Oh, I'm gonna search a beavers ass for a way to flavour this ice cream..."


    LOL. I was thinking the same thing. Apparently, there are reports refuting the use of Castoreum in food products. But it's main use is in perfumes. You always wonder how "discoveries" of these sort come about. My guess would be that beaver pelts were used and sold to make various products, and the glands were left to dry out and someone discovered that "aroma".

    The musk glands from many animals are harvested for perfumes.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14391

    Jan 27, 2013 7:45 PM GMT
    Some of these chemical additives make high fructose corn syrup look harmless. How frightening.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 27, 2013 7:56 PM GMT
    Trollileo said
    yourname2000 said
    okcomputer2010 saidYou forgot to mention gelatin! Gelatin is made from pig skin, bones, and connective tissue. Yummmmm

    Yeah, I hear they've been putting ascorbic acid in oranges, too. I mean, who wants to be downing acid with breakfast...that's like, far out man. icon_wink.gif
    That's almost as bad as dihydrogen monoxide in the water.


    Brilliant
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 27, 2013 9:03 PM GMT
    Trollileo said>
    That's almost as bad as dihydrogen monoxide in the water.

    I bet you could get 80% of people on the street to sign a petition to ban this (or 99% if it was an on-line petition!) icon_wink.gificon_lol.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 27, 2013 9:04 PM GMT
    Following this... sick! icon_eek.gificon_eek.gificon_eek.gif