Question about airway travel

  • commoncoll

    Posts: 1222

    Apr 06, 2012 10:47 PM GMT
    Say I need to go from city A to city B, but the tickets are too expensive.

    I found a trip that is $125 cheaper on Continental but the arrival city is city C. The route goes like this:
    Departure:
    4:00 city A-> city B with a layover of 1 hour
    6:30 city B-> city C
    Return
    7:00city C-> city B with layover of half hour
    8:00 city B-> city A

    The bold are where I really need to go. I doubt the airlines cares, but is it OK to just take the flight I need and not take the others? For example, will they say anything if I just take the second return flight and skip the first one? How many boarding passes will there be?
  • Dominican_Gen...

    Posts: 379

    Apr 07, 2012 12:34 AM GMT
    Hmmm... interesting. I'm posting because I'm interested on that as well. Somebody have real info or experience?

    OP: Did you book it as a round trip or as two separate on-way trips? That could factor in for the return flight.
  • ciizer

    Posts: 107

    Apr 07, 2012 12:49 AM GMT
    but i'm not sure if the States are the same system as with european budget flights, here, you can check-in online 2 weeks before your flight, and when that is done, you only have to show up at the boarding gate at the designated time.

    to answer your 2nd question, are you talking about the same airline company? sound like you are, then you will get 2 boarding passes, 1 departure, 1 return. chances are that you will need to check in from City C for return. any delays would be beared by the same airline company.

    If you are talking about 2 different airlines, then you will have 4 boarding passes. and you can check in in City B to return to City A. however, lay over for half an hour, that would be risky mate. if you get delayed, in your return trip, there goes your flight.

    i hope this helps. good luck
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 07, 2012 12:52 AM GMT
    There are others who might give a better answer if they are in the travel business. I recall this point being discussed a few years ago, so it might not apply today and it might vary from airline to airline.

    You would have two separate boarding passes. If you checked bags, they would be checked to the final destination of course. The only issue I remember is any return leg would be cancelled, and reinstating the return could involve penalties, plus you would need to board from city C.

    What I would do is call the airline before making a reservation, not giving them any information such as your frequent flier id (so nothing could be noted on your reservation) and just ask the question.
  • melloyello

    Posts: 149

    Apr 07, 2012 2:02 AM GMT
    If you don't take your trip from City B to City C, it will cancel your return flight and you'll lose it in my experience. Call the airline to confirm but I believe thats how it works.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 07, 2012 2:03 AM GMT
    It really depends on the airline how strictly it's enforced. I did a flight (on CX in asia which I don't have status on) that had two stops and I got off at the intermediate stop and did all carry on (I didn't book it so I didn't know that it made the intermediate stop and the return stated it was a direct flight).

    On the return they seemed a bit annoyed about it and I've heard stories where they will ban you from the airline if you do it often. There's even a name for it - "hidden city ticketing".

    You can google it - or here's an article that describes it:
    http://www.smartertravel.com/travel-advice/what-happens-if-skip-part-of-my-flight.html?id=2789157
    http://www.lonelyplanet.com/thorntree/thread.jspa?threadID=1798533

    Bottomline - it's a gamble.
  • offshore

    Posts: 1294

    Apr 07, 2012 2:08 AM GMT
    ALSO, don;t forget this won;t work if you have check in luggage.

    Check in luggage will automatically go to the final destination, you don't have the option to have it off loaded in a mid way point.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 07, 2012 2:59 AM GMT
    Done it a million times. Just don't make it a habit, don't check any luggage, and make sure you let the airline know you're not getting on the second leg of the flight after you reach your preferred destination so they can release the seat. If they ask why, tell them you're sick/the flight caused you anxiety/the friend you traveled with is having an emergency/your business is having a crisis that you need to be on the ground to help fix/ etc etc etc.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 07, 2012 4:10 AM GMT
    commoncoll saidQuestion about airway travel
    Don't do it! It's a trap!

    If humans were meant to fly, we'd have wings.

    *hides pilot certificate*
  • commoncoll

    Posts: 1222

    Apr 07, 2012 2:19 PM GMT
    Thank you.

    I will have no luggage checked in. This are domestic US flights. And I will have to change planes in between the layover so that's why I was thinking there would be one boarding pass per plane and I could just skip out on 1/2 the flight routes.

    And I won't be doing it often, maybe once every couple of months if my direct flights are too expensive.

    Since I will be staying in City B for a month, I think I will just buy a one way just in case ticket for now, so they aren't tempted to cancel my return flight.
  • Suetonius

    Posts: 1842

    Apr 07, 2012 3:52 PM GMT
    Almost all US airlines will cancel the return reservation if you don't board the last leg of your trip. The only sure way to do it successfully (if the discount fares are low enough) is to buy two round trips on two different airlines - not completing the trip on airline 1, and returning on airline 2 (starting that ticket in your destination city). (In effect, you are throwing away the return trip on both airlines).
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 07, 2012 3:54 PM GMT
    Suetonius saidAlmost all US airlines will cancel the return reservation if you don't board the last leg of your trip. The only sure way to do it successfully (if the discount fares are low enough) is to buy two round trips on two different airlines - not completing the trip on airline 1, and returning on airline 2 (starting that ticket in your destination city). (In effect, you are throwing away the return trip on both airlines).

    No need to buy round-trip tickets.
  • Suetonius

    Posts: 1842

    Apr 07, 2012 4:18 PM GMT
    socalfitness said
    Suetonius saidAlmost all US airlines will cancel the return reservation if you don't board the last leg of your trip. The only sure way to do it successfully (if the discount fares are low enough) is to buy two round trips on two different airlines - not completing the trip on airline 1, and returning on airline 2 (starting that ticket in your destination city). (In effect, you are throwing away the return trip on both airlines).

    No need to buy round-trip tickets.

    True if you are in Y and don't care about the price. Most airlines' discount non-refundable roundtrip fares (M,Q,V, W, etc) cost much less than two one-way Y fares.
  • commoncoll

    Posts: 1222

    Apr 07, 2012 4:37 PM GMT
    Suetonius said
    socalfitness said
    Suetonius saidAlmost all US airlines will cancel the return reservation if you don't board the last leg of your trip. The only sure way to do it successfully (if the discount fares are low enough) is to buy two round trips on two different airlines - not completing the trip on airline 1, and returning on airline 2 (starting that ticket in your destination city). (In effect, you are throwing away the return trip on both airlines).

    No need to buy round-trip tickets.

    True if you are in Y and don't care about the price. Most airlines' discount non-refundable roundtrip fares (M,Q,V, W, etc) cost much less than two one-way Y fares.

    I wondered about the cancellation.

    There are two airlines that go between the cities I am trying to go to: Continental and Southwest. American Airlines goes as well, but it is always too expensive in any case. The rate of a one-way flight is exactly half the rate of a roundtrip. It costs about $10 extra for return flight because of travel from a popular airport to less popular airport.

    I could drive, but it would only be about $70 less overall than flying and takes about 9.5 hrs from A to B and it would be HOT.
  • Suetonius

    Posts: 1842

    Apr 07, 2012 5:10 PM GMT
    commoncoll said
    Suetonius said
    socalfitness said
    Suetonius saidAlmost all US airlines will cancel the return reservation if you don't board the last leg of your trip. The only sure way to do it successfully (if the discount fares are low enough) is to buy two round trips on two different airlines - not completing the trip on airline 1, and returning on airline 2 (starting that ticket in your destination city). (In effect, you are throwing away the return trip on both airlines).

    No need to buy round-trip tickets.

    True if you are in Y and don't care about the price. Most airlines' discount non-refundable roundtrip fares (M,Q,V, W, etc) cost much less than two one-way Y fares.

    I wondered about the cancellation.

    There are two airlines that go between the cities I am trying to go to: Continental and Southwest. American Airlines goes as well, but it is always too expensive in any case. The rate of a one-way flight is exactly half the rate of a roundtrip. It costs about $10 extra for return flight because of travel from a popular airport to less popular airport.

    I could drive, but it would only be about $70 less overall than flying and takes about 9.5 hrs from A to B and it would be HOT.


    If the one-way is half the cost of a round trip, then get one-way tickets like Socal said.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 07, 2012 5:17 PM GMT
    commoncoll saidSay I need to go from city A to city B, but the tickets are too expensive.

    I found a trip that is $125 cheaper on Continental but the arrival city is city C. The route goes like this:
    Departure:
    4:00 city A-> city B with a layover of 1 hour
    6:30 city B-> city C
    Return
    7:00city C-> city B with layover of half hour
    8:00 city B-> city A

    The bold are where I really need to go. I doubt the airlines cares, but is it OK to just take the flight I need and not take the others? For example, will they say anything if I just take the second return flight and skip the first one? How many boarding passes will there be?


    Generally speaking, you can get off the plane or get on it at any segment, provided you have a boarding pass. As I understand it, get on at City A, and you want to get off on city B, which a stop on the way to city C. Your luggage will end up in city C. You'd need to tell the flight crew what you're doing (it messes up head count). There's no rule that says you can't get off the plane wherever.

    What arouses scrutiny from Homeland Security is one way flights paid for with cash.

    I'd talk to reservations for the airlines, but, they'll probably be fine with it if you tell them what you wish to do. The main thing is to understand what their rules are. They'll work with you.

    In my experience Delta have been jerks. With Southwest, it's been as simple as "Hey, can I take that plane over there back to Dallas instead?" SWA's answer was "Sure."

    Getting back on in the wrong city may be an issue. You'll want to talk to the airline about how they handle it. It's the best way to avoid surprises. To the airline, it's all revenue. Likely, they'll find a solution.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 08, 2012 1:36 AM GMT
    Suetonius saidAlmost all US airlines will cancel the return reservation if you don't board the last leg of your trip. The only sure way to do it successfully (if the discount fares are low enough) is to buy two round trips on two different airlines - not completing the trip on airline 1, and returning on airline 2 (starting that ticket in your destination city). (In effect, you are throwing away the return trip on both airlines).


    Exactly..the computer systems now will autocancel it if it is on the same carrier. Wow, now I feel like an old man in that i can remember when hidden cities worked on the same airline!