How the Natural Hair of Blacks is Perceived in American Society~ (tee hee hee...Thanks TropicalMark~)

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    Apr 09, 2012 7:39 AM GMT
    And no, I'm not trying to start a race baiting thread. There's a an that black hair is more accepted by people of other cultures than it is our own.

    Like Wendy Williams's comments on "The Help" actress, Viola Davis, rocking her natural hair saying it was "Not formal" and "made her look like a man" (of all people to talk... Really Wendy?)

    ViolaDavis-Oscars2012-jpg_015709.jpg

    Of course the ending result is usually something like the following photos:

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQltlHkEx0XE6EHmbNK5t8

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSy-CYdr-ypCsnhF4BJvTd


    The topic of hair and self-image can run VERY deep for some. I'm just curious as to people's perception on the natural hair texture of blacks: be they complimentary or as politically incorrect as they come:

    Is it beautiful icon_smile.gif ?
    Too nappy for your taste icon_confused.gif ?
    Unprofessional vs professional icon_mad.gif ?
    Sad that blacks usually don't usually appreciate the hair that grows out of their head icon_cry.gif ?
    Umm... why the hell am I reading this icon_rolleyes.gif ?
    Would you like to touch it icon_wink.gif ?
    Would you rather NOT touch it icon_twisted.gif ?
    "PERM (chemically straighten) THAT SHIT!"?

    What are your thoughts (if any~)
  • BmwKid92

    Posts: 1097

    Apr 09, 2012 8:09 AM GMT
    macy grey hair was awsome
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    Apr 09, 2012 8:42 AM GMT
    Trollileo saidI have no idea what you're talking about...


    Try this~



    It gets rolling a bit after the 3 minute mark. Part 2 is a bit more sad, lol... This video revolves around black women and their hair.

    As a young, black man, I NEVER wanted longer hair (until recently) because I didn't want to be stereotyped and prejudged. Yea, some may say that "It doesn't matter what people think of you", but when getting a job, it does matter. It also matters when there are formal events and public places that have a "no dreadlocks/braids allowed" policy. For this reason, MANY blacks style, cut, and chemically alter their natural hair to conform to America's Euro-centric perception of beauty.
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    Apr 09, 2012 6:53 PM GMT
    I've always thought that the most beautiful African American women had short cropped naturals. Maybe it's the lack of pretense I find attractive, how unusual that's become to the point of being exotic, and the way it seems to broadcast that they have higher priorities. I've known Nigerian women who relocated to America and kept their hair short and natural who were absolutely stunning.
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    Apr 09, 2012 7:05 PM GMT
    I love my natural hair. Not ashamed to rock it out



    icon_cool.gif
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    Apr 09, 2012 7:10 PM GMT
    But some men use straighter and chemicals edward do u use that?
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    Apr 09, 2012 7:12 PM GMT
    Photobucket

    i have half-african hair icon_razz.gif
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    Apr 09, 2012 7:13 PM GMT
    When I first saw Chaka Khan in the 'I feel for you' (80's) video and subsequently at the Grammy's, I thought her big red hair was awesome!!


    "baby baby when i look at youuu.."

    Chaka-Khan.jpg
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    Apr 09, 2012 7:36 PM GMT
    This is my natural hair~

    310_584680139277_12634773_38061921_5290_

    I've decided only recently to grow it a bit because I never considered how beautiful it might be rather than focusing so much on being stereotyped. I can only hope that it won't cause me TOO many issues, lol~
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    Apr 09, 2012 7:39 PM GMT
    When I was a kid, I was always jealous of my friends who could grow afros, europoid, negroid, or mongoloid (there's people with course, curly hair in all three)
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    Apr 09, 2012 8:10 PM GMT
    GreenHopper saidWhen I was a kid, I was always jealous of my friends who could grow afros, europoid, negroid, or mongoloid (there's people with course, curly hair in all three)


    Aside from being wavy and easy to manage, the only thing that I DON'T like about my hair is its coarseness lol! On a scale from 1-10, its probably a 10 (even despite how shiny and wavy it looks in the photo above, lol!)
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    Apr 09, 2012 8:37 PM GMT
    Those are NOT "African American" hair do's.. No such thing. There are Americans and there are Africans. That is all.
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    Apr 09, 2012 8:49 PM GMT
    TropicalMark saidThose are NOT "African American" hair do's.. No such thing. There are Americans and there are Africans. That is all.


    If it helps, I could stop using "blacks" and "African Americans" interchangeably.

    This thread is about the texture of the hair of black people and how its perceived in American society, not about "black hair do's" (no one in this thread has said anything about a hair do).
    For instance, there are some who would hesitate to hire a black man with a full blown afro because they do not believe that its professional despite how neat it may look.
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    Apr 09, 2012 8:51 PM GMT
    Final_Fantasy said
    TropicalMark saidThose are NOT "African American" hair do's.. No such thing. There are Americans and there are Africans. That is all.


    This thread is about the texture of the hair of black people and how its perceived in American society, not about "black hair do's" (no one in this thread has said anything about a hair do).
    For instance, there are some who would hesitate to hire a black man with a full blown afro because they do not believe that its professional despite how neat it may look.
    This thread is about the texture of the hair of black people and how its perceived in American society<----- much better title.
    I noticed you didnt use an incorrect descriptor. carry on.
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    Apr 09, 2012 8:59 PM GMT
    TropicalMark said
    Final_Fantasy said
    TropicalMark saidThose are NOT "African American" hair do's.. No such thing. There are Americans and there are Africans. That is all.


    This thread is about the texture of the hair of black people and how its perceived in American society, not about "black hair do's" (no one in this thread has said anything about a hair do).
    For instance, there are some who would hesitate to hire a black man with a full blown afro because they do not believe that its professional despite how neat it may look.
    This thread is about the texture of the hair of black people and how its perceived in American society<----- much better title.
    I noticed you didnt use an incorrect descriptor. carry on.


    I must say that I wish that more people thought and believe what you do, TropicalMark~ icon_smile.gif
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    Apr 09, 2012 9:01 PM GMT
    Final_Fantasy said
    TropicalMark said
    Final_Fantasy said
    TropicalMark saidThose are NOT "African American" hair do's.. No such thing. There are Americans and there are Africans. That is all.


    This thread is about the texture of the hair of black people and how its perceived in American society, not about "black hair do's" (no one in this thread has said anything about a hair do).
    For instance, there are some who would hesitate to hire a black man with a full blown afro because they do not believe that its professional despite how neat it may look.
    This thread is about the texture of the hair of black people and how its perceived in American society<----- much better title.
    I noticed you didnt use an incorrect descriptor. carry on.


    I must say that I wish that more people thought and believe what you do, TropicalMark~ icon_smile.gif
    And all this time you thought i was fucking with ya! LOL.. Nah, cant do that to my brothers!
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    Apr 09, 2012 9:24 PM GMT
    In an ideal world, everyone would be happy with what they are given at birth and would not bother to conform to some cookie-cutter standard of beauty.

    Than again, it's up to every single person to decide what is beautiful for him/herself, and it's not really anyone else's place to second-guess his/her choices. And this goes in both ways. Wendy Williams' comment is rather rude and tactless, if not spoken in jest.

    I find the beauty aspirations of the women on the Tyra Show, who wanted to achieve the "white-girl flow", rather saddening, because there seems to be some degree of self-hatred involved. Isn't it a bit boring if everyone on the street is wearing the same contrived (and chemically-enhanced) hairdo? There are enough women already who look plastic and unnatural; why would anyone hop on the same bandwagon and incur irreparable damage on yourself in the process?

    The "end result" pictures you posted are both examples of beautiful, natural hair, though I would say shorter hair goes better with most men, regardless of texture.

    It has nothing to do with professionalism. If natural hair becomes an issue that might endanger your career prospects, it is the profession, not the hair, that needs some serious fixing.
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    Apr 09, 2012 9:31 PM GMT
    GreenHopper saidWhen I was a kid, I was always jealous of my friends who could grow afros, europoid, negroid, or mongoloid (there's people with course, curly hair in all three)
    I even tried an afro right out of HS.. I failed miserably.. my hair is to thin/fine.icon_sad.gif
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    Apr 09, 2012 10:22 PM GMT
    camomq saidIn an ideal world, everyone would be happy with what they are given at birth and would not bother to conform to some cookie-cutter standard of beauty.

    Than again, it's up to every single person to decide what is beautiful for him/herself, and it's not really anyone else's place to second-guess his/her choices. And this goes in both ways. Wendy Williams' comment is rather rude and tactless, if not spoken in jest.

    I find the beauty aspirations of the women on the Tyra Show, who wanted to achieve the "white-girl flow", rather saddening, because there seems to be some degree of self-hatred involved. Isn't it a bit boring if everyone on the street is wearing the same contrived (and chemically-enhanced) hairdo? There are enough women already who look plastic and unnatural; why would anyone hop on the same bandwagon and incur irreparable damage on yourself in the process?

    The "end result" pictures you posted are both examples of beautiful, natural hair, though I would say shorter hair goes better with most men, regardless of texture.

    It has nothing to do with professionalism. If natural hair becomes an issue that might endanger your career prospects, it is the profession, not the hair, that needs some serious fixing.


    I agree with your perspective 110%. It IS up to the individual to define what beauty means for him/herself. As for Mr. Wendy Williams... Honestly, it wasn't just rude and tactless... but it was a SLAP to the face of all blacks who love themselves. How much of Wendy IS real? Hair? Fail... Nose? Fail... Breasts? Fail... Hair... Just drop out, that's too many F's. She's as bad as the black girl who wanted the "white girl flow".

    I think that Tyra said it best on her segment on "How Black Men are Perceived": You need to do what you need to for a job. You may have to cut your dreadlocks. But once you get that job, you GROW that thing out and MAKE them fire you!"
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 09, 2012 10:24 PM GMT
    camomq saidIn an ideal world, everyone would be happy with what they are given at birth and would not bother to conform to some cookie-cutter standard of beauty.

    Than again, it's up to every single person to decide what is beautiful for him/herself, and it's not really anyone else's place to second-guess his/her choices. And this goes in both ways. Wendy Williams' comment is rather rude and tactless, if not spoken in jest.

    I find the beauty aspirations of the women on the Tyra Show, who wanted to achieve the "white-girl flow", rather saddening, because there seems to be some degree of self-hatred involved. Isn't it a bit boring if everyone on the street is wearing the same contrived (and chemically-enhanced) hairdo? There are enough women already who look plastic and unnatural; why would anyone hop on the same bandwagon and incur irreparable damage on yourself in the process?

    The "end result" pictures you posted are both examples of beautiful, natural hair, though I would say shorter hair goes better with most men, regardless of texture.

    It has nothing to do with professionalism. If natural hair becomes an issue that might endanger your career prospects, it is the profession, not the hair, that needs some serious fixing.


    Also, Camomq, if you think the black girl who wanted the "white girl flow" was sad, check out part 2...

  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Apr 09, 2012 10:58 PM GMT
    I don't understand why non-whites try to hold themselves to an anglo standard of beauty.
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    Apr 09, 2012 11:10 PM GMT
    Timbales saidI don't understand why non-whites try to hold themselves to an anglo standard of beauty.


    It's an extremely deeply culturally entrenched thing, not a passing whim or fad of choice. In Mexico I was constantly praised over and over when I was growing up because I had green eyes (the norm is brown eyes, a much smaller percentage of the population has colored eyes). I was constantly made to feel my green eyes were a superior privilege.
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Apr 09, 2012 11:14 PM GMT
    Ariodante said
    Timbales saidI don't understand why non-whites try to hold themselves to an anglo standard of beauty.


    It's an extremely deeply culturally entrenched thing, not a passing whim or fad of choice. In Mexico I was constantly praised over and over when I was growing up because I had green eyes (the norm is brown eyes, a much smaller percentage of the population has colored eyes). I was constantly made to feel my green eyes were a superior privilege.


    I should have said it differently, I do understand it but I find it unfair and unfortunate.
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    Apr 09, 2012 11:16 PM GMT
    Ariodante said
    Timbales saidI don't understand why non-whites try to hold themselves to an anglo standard of beauty.


    It's an extremely deeply culturally entrenched thing, not a passing whim or fad of choice. In Mexico I was constantly praised over and over when I was growing up because I had green eyes (the norm is brown eyes, a much smaller percentage of the population has colored eyes). I was constantly made to feel my green eyes were a superior privilege.
    Your eyes STILL amaze me!
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Apr 09, 2012 11:19 PM GMT
    TropicalMark said
    Ariodante said
    Timbales saidI don't understand why non-whites try to hold themselves to an anglo standard of beauty.


    It's an extremely deeply culturally entrenched thing, not a passing whim or fad of choice. In Mexico I was constantly praised over and over when I was growing up because I had green eyes (the norm is brown eyes, a much smaller percentage of the population has colored eyes). I was constantly made to feel my green eyes were a superior privilege.
    Your eyes STILL amaze me!


    everything about him amazes me wub.png