When You Get to 60 or 70 Should You Add d-Ribose or ATP to Your Protein Powder Intake?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 10, 2012 1:37 AM GMT
    Hi,

    I'm turning 50 and my dad is turning 83. He is not as muscular as I would like him to be.

    I look forward to your comments.

    With sincere thanks,
    Steefen
  • CuriousJockAZ

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    Apr 10, 2012 4:27 AM GMT
    StephenOABC saidHi,

    I'm turning 50 and my dad is turning 83. He is not as muscular as I would like him to be.

    I look forward to your comments.

    With sincere thanks,
    Steefen



    Don't put that kind of pressure on old dad...Let him enjoy his later years just being what he is.
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    Apr 10, 2012 11:37 AM GMT
    I was thinking:

    1) Protein powder helps build muscles

    2) d-Ribose and ATP helps muscular activity (I came across d-Ribose because it specifically helps the heart muscle.)

    Let's say a bicep muscle has one type of tissue but tissues of organs have different tissues. So, it seems plausible that bio-chemists could come up with a supplement that feeds heart muscles with more precision.

    Jack LaLane eventually died, yes.

    As I make sure to get enough protein during my 40s and 50s; and, as I plan financially for food intake in my 50s-90s; and, since supplements I see as necessary for that age range aren't covered by the nutritional guidelines for government programs, I thought I would ask about adding d-Ribose to the weekly groceries.
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    Apr 10, 2012 11:39 AM GMT
    AMoonHawk saidWhen you get old you loose muscle. It is inevitable. As of yet, there is nothing to stop the aging process. Though they have found that lift light weights does help slow down the process.


    Some cardio seems to be important also. Many people do not breathe deeply. I used to enjoy swimming because it would make my lungs and chest cavity stronger than not swimming or doing breathing exercises for choir concerts and some vocal solos.
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    Apr 29, 2012 2:36 PM GMT
    StephenOABC saidHi,

    I'm turning 50 and my dad is turning 83. He is not as muscular as I would like him to be.

    I look forward to your comments.

    With sincere thanks,
    Steefen
    One can only wonder "why" you want your dad to be more muscular. icon_eek.gif
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    Apr 29, 2012 2:53 PM GMT
    My dad died when he was 80... that's another story.... At that time i got my mom into weight lifting.... took her twice a week for years. Now she is quite elderly... she had a mini stroke and she can't go back into her own home. She has fallen about 80 times in the last year and never broken anything.

    Weight bearing exercise is one of the best things people over 80 can do. It builds bone density. (it takes 7 years). I would have your dad workout on machines more than free weights because of the control factor and one side can assist the other. Mom was squatting 95lbs before the stroke. It's never too late....Good luck with your dad.