Favorite Computer Books?

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    Apr 10, 2012 5:03 AM GMT
    Do you have a favorite author or publisher for computer-related books? I'd like to learn some new skills this summer, if I can find the time. I like books that have some hands-on exercises. I learn much better that way.
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    Apr 10, 2012 7:29 AM GMT
    O'Reilly . Their "Learning.. " series books are excellent primers for learning a new programming languages. Pretty straight forward. Not too much fluff. Geeks' choice. Plus they have pretty interesting illustrations on their books. icon_biggrin.gif

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    Apress and Wrox both put out decent programming books as well. Only thing I don't like about Wrox books is that they're usually written by multiple authors in the same book. So you kinda have to adjust to each author's writing style as you make your way through the chapters.

    Deitel. Their books tend to be on the expensive side. But they're usually well written and have lots of examples and illustrations. They produce a wide variety of computer/internet/programming books. Definitely worth checking out.

    I tend to not like the "For Dummies" books. They tend to simplify things too much and gloss over some important details. Same with the Sam's "Teach Yourself.." books. I forgot the name of the publisher but they make those "Bible" books. Those books are ok. They cover the basics and have good illustrations/examples. Probably a couple steps above the Dummies books, in terms of quality of content.
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    Apr 16, 2012 1:17 AM GMT
    I have several O'Reilly books, but I find them dry and boring. I think they work better as reference books. Wrox has been one of my favorites because they give good examples that you can try as your reading.

    Has anyone started using e-books or PDFs instead of buying printed books? I've seen companies offer PDFs, but PDFs don't display as well on a tablet as an e-book does. On the other hand, a PDF would work on more platforms.
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    Apr 16, 2012 1:21 AM GMT
    When I teach non-credit classes - I use the "In Easy Steps" books. I originally found them at Barnes & Noble. I think they were exclusively sold there for a while. - You can find them on Amazon - or other places now...

    The books are really inexpensive. - Like $10-12 each.

    http://ineasysteps.com/

    They are easy to follow and understand. - They have a "Seniors" series that I use when I teach Senior Citizen computer classes.

    I have used the regular books, though.

    Edit: I realize now, those may not be advanced enough for you, though. Sorry.
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    Apr 16, 2012 3:44 AM GMT
    The "Head First" style books are pretty good at giving you an introduction to specific topics.