Cycling

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 15, 2012 5:53 AM GMT
    Does anybody own a bicycle on RJ? I've gotten a pretty awesome one recently and have been in love ever since. Every single day I'll bike to new locations and try to bike more miles than the previous day. It's relaxing to just bike through the woods, by the lake, or just wherever. I also love what it's doing to my leg muscles haha!

    I still have many questions about it so I was curious if anyone else biked/cycled around here!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 15, 2012 6:11 AM GMT
    What sort of questions?
  • DanOmatic

    Posts: 1155

    Apr 15, 2012 12:16 PM GMT
    I ride about 150 or more miles a week. Feel free to ask questions.
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Apr 15, 2012 12:45 PM GMT
    in answer to your question if anyone owns a bicycle on realjock... yes.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 15, 2012 12:48 PM GMT
    Yeah I do. I love riding to Central Park, Manhattan
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 15, 2012 1:17 PM GMT
    Yes, have had a road bike and done long distance riding since 1962, and I've posted some of the threads to this cycling forum. Ask away.

    Oh, and please tell us what kind and brand of bike you have, with pics if possible.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 15, 2012 1:18 PM GMT
    What kind of bike? I ride a road bike. Into hour sprints - 14 to 18 miles of #3 difficulty on 1-5 scale, meaning 1/2 challenging hills. Today going more for miles than time, though.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 15, 2012 1:20 PM GMT
    Yup, both road and mtn bikes.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 15, 2012 1:22 PM GMT
    calibro saidin answer to your question if anyone owns a bicycle on realjock... yes.
    I just love you. icon_biggrin.gificon_lol.gif

    I have a road bike and ride in the spring thru fall. Love riding early on Sunday mornings when traffic is light.

    Haven't ridden this year yet but will soon.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 15, 2012 2:08 PM GMT
    Cannondale System Six dura ace

    I sold it last fall because this just isn't a good place to bike.


  • mmmm_mmmm

    Posts: 1658

    Apr 15, 2012 2:11 PM GMT
    Yup -- three bikes: two mountain, one road. Used to mountain bike race for many many years, esp ultra-endurance races. So ask away.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 15, 2012 2:16 PM GMT
    I have 6.
  • jaxsurfer

    Posts: 83

    Apr 15, 2012 2:50 PM GMT
    I ride 52 weeks a year about 10 to 14 hours a week on average and 100 percent of it is standing freestyle, never sitting on the seat.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 15, 2012 2:53 PM GMT
    jaxsurfer saidI ride 52 weeks a year about 10 to 14 hours a week on average and 100 percent of it is standing freestyle, never sitting on the seat.


    I didn't know there was a name for that...is that the official name? I stand freestyle too most of the ride (unless going downhill) because it is a mountain bike, it is heavy, and I travel faster that way. It also incorporates the glut muscles so you can get more force with less fatigue--and more butt tone icon_smile.gif

    I ride to and from my home and school, work, internship multiple times a day. It is my time machine, because walking or driving would take longer.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 15, 2012 4:42 PM GMT
    Thanks for the feedback everyone! It is a mountain bike (I think) that I was able to get brand new for $20 bucks. Retail price is around $300 so I was very lucky.

    Some of my questions:
    1.) How long do bikes typically last? Some of you said you've had them for years so I'm guessing I won't expect mine to go out anytime soon.

    2.) Gears confuse me. I've never touched a bike in my life like this so it's a little intimidating to me. On the left side it has "1, 2, 3" and on the right it has "1-7." I'm guessing switch to 7 for flat roads and around 3 while going up hill? I'm still confused on what I need to keep the left side gears on but I usually just leave it on 2.

    I can't think of anymore for now. Thanks everyone!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 15, 2012 6:50 PM GMT
    With proper maintenance, your bike will last forever. I'll get to that later.

    As far as the gears go, the shifters on the left and right are for your front and rear gears. The 1-2-3 on the left handlebar shifts the gears up front. You have three chain rings affixed to your crank (the arm where the pedal is attached). The 1-7 on the right handle is for the cassette of 7 gears on the back. This means you have a 21 speed bike (3 x 7 = 21)!

    Play around with it, but here's how it works. The small, inside ring on the front is your easiest gear to ride in. It's the one you'd use on hills. The big, outer ring on the front is your hardest gear, but on flats will get you where you're going the fastest.

    On the cassette in the back, it's the opposite. The small, outer cog is your fastest gear and the largest, inner cog is your easiest but slowest. You would be in the large cog going up hills and the small cog on flats.

    When people have told me that shifting is confusing and that they never know what gear to be in, I tell them it's easy: If your legs are spinning fast and you're going nowhere, shift to a harder gear. If you're straining with all your might to turn the crank, shift to an easier gear. Most of your shifting will be in the back through the 7 cogs, and then shifting up or down on the front through the chain rings depending on the terrain. You've got 21 options, but you'll figure them out pretty easily once you get out there.

    As far as maintenance goes, it's a new bike, so your brake and shifter cables will stretch out. Take the bike in to have the cables tightened after a few rides (mountain bikers, how many rides? I'm a road cyclist, and I usually adjust after the first 100 or so miles). Clean the bike off whenever it's muddy or dirty--especially the chain and the other drivetrain components. Lube the chain and the other moving parts. Check the brake pads for wear and change them when they are worn down. Take it in for a tune-up once a year. Do all that and you'll be riding that bike until you decide you like riding so much you need a better bike. Repeat.

    Have fun!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 16, 2012 12:17 AM GMT
    1) Bikes can last a very long time if you maintain them. I'd say rust/neglect are the biggest killers. Learn how to change your tires/tubes. Also, learn how to remove/repair your chain.

    2) Pretty much what Erik said above. Personally, I leave the rear gear in a middle position and just shift the front gear for city riding. Only 3 to choose from.. I keep it simple. I might eventually convert it into single gear setup. I've been looking to buy an old school BMX cruiser bike, but no one seems to make them anymore. So a conversion might be a decent alternative.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 16, 2012 12:46 AM GMT
    erik911sd saidWhen people have told me that shifting is confusing and that they never know what gear to be in, I tell them it's easy: If your legs are spinning fast and you're going nowhere, shift to a harder gear. If you're straining with all your might to turn the crank, shift to an easier gear. Most of your shifting will be in the back through the 7 cogs, and then shifting up or down on the front through the chain rings depending on the terrain. You've got 21 options, but you'll figure them out pretty easily once you get out there.

    I concur. The purpose of the gears is to give you a pedal rate that is comfortable for your abilities, and is consistent. The term for your pedaling rate is "cadence", that is, the rotational speed of your pedal crank, how fast your feet are going up and down.

    I like a cadence that's between 60 and 70 rotations per minute, regardless of my forward speed. The gears allow you to maintain this steady pedaling cadence, even as your forward speed varies, up inclines, on flat terrain, and against or with the wind.

    Experienced riders just sense their cadence rate, but you can also get an electronic speedometer that displays both forward speed in MPH and distance traveled, as well as your pedaling cadence, using an additional sensor near the crank. A bike shop can assist you.

    Cadence tends to be more critical for road bikes going long distances, than with mountain bikes. Later you may wish to add another bicycle to your "stable" that's a road bike. Each kind of bike is suited to a different job.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 16, 2012 3:10 PM GMT
    Wow! Thanks for all your in-depth advice guys. It certainly has given me more insight on it. And a HUGE thank you to Erik for taking the time explain that to me!

  • drypin

    Posts: 1798

    Apr 16, 2012 3:27 PM GMT
    Does anyone here own a bike?! I'd vote for it to be mandatory for membership in RealJock!

    I've given up on biking on mountains, so I prefer following the gentle rivers of Germany and France.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 16, 2012 3:50 PM GMT
    drypin saidDoes anyone here own a bike?! I'd vote for it to be mandatory for membership in RealJock!

    I've given up on biking on mountains, so I prefer following the gentle rivers of Germany and France.


    Haha I could agree with that. I think EVERYONE should own a bike. Maybe obesity rates would go down in America. I know in some countries where kids bike to school, obesity rates are very low. Buy a bike, save the world!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 16, 2012 3:53 PM GMT
    Mt bike, love it!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 16, 2012 5:46 PM GMT
    Here I am in an orange helmet to the left, leaving Saturday morning from Marathon Key, having done 100 miles the day before, 65 miles ahead of us to reach Key West. That handicapped car placard on my handlebars is my own, put there to show off a bit, but also to later encourage others with pics like this to join our ride, people who might be intimidated by the 165-mile distance.

    I must walk with a cane, but I call my bike my "2-wheeled wheelchair" because it's easier for me than walking. The pressure & impact on my legs & feet when pedaling is much less than when walking.

    Last year my rider number was 62, my age. This year I'm already assigned rider number 63, the age I am for this next ride in November.

    file-4.jpg
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 17, 2012 2:22 AM GMT
    Josh1992 said
    drypin saidDoes anyone here own a bike?! I'd vote for it to be mandatory for membership in RealJock!

    I've given up on biking on mountains, so I prefer following the gentle rivers of Germany and France.


    Haha I could agree with that. I think EVERYONE should own a bike. Maybe obesity rates would go down in America. I know in some countries where kids bike to school, obesity rates are very low. Buy a bike, save the world!


    I read an interesting article about bike ownership and young people yesterday in The Atlantic:
    http://www.theatlanticcities.com/commute/2012/04/why-young-americans-are-driving-so-much-less-their-parents/1712/
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 26, 2012 2:55 AM GMT
    Saw this today and thought of this thread. Shifting tips for rookie cyclists:
    http://www.active.com/cycling/Articles/3-Shifting-Tips-for-Rookie-Cyclists.htm