Ego Depletion

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    Apr 18, 2012 4:40 AM GMT
    I came across an interesting article. I was wondering what take others had on the subject. It's a lengthy article, but really takes note of things in the human psych I felt I've always known, but never really acknowledge.

    It basically says that self control is not a skill, but a finite resource. The more you exercise it, the less you have (until you give in).

    http://youarenotsosmart.com/2012/04/17/ego-depletion/

    They have an interesting study with people who are told they've been excluded by a group and their behaviour as a result of it.

    It made me wonder if a lot of the personalities/traits of gay adults is partially a consequence of either:
    a) being excluded by others when they were younger for being gay. And along the way developing a state of mind of “Why keep regulating my behavior if no one cares what I do?”. Thus doing things that may not be deemed culturally acceptable to satisfy the "id' (pleasure seeking subconscious).
    OR
    b) excluding themselves because they were afraid of being made fun of for being gay and constantly controlled/suppressed that part of them. Obviously over time, the ego is worn out by avoiding temptation or suppressing emotions and thoughts and eventually it slip up.

    I'm the last person to ever claim I have any understanding of the human brain. I just thought it was interesting and thought invoking icon_smile.gif
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    Apr 18, 2012 1:29 PM GMT
    Really? No responses?
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    Apr 18, 2012 1:44 PM GMT
    Bump*
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    Apr 18, 2012 1:52 PM GMT
    Well, a lot to digest first thing in the morning, when our glucose levels are low.

    Whether my personal experience conforms to this hypothesis or not, I do observe that I have periods of ego depletion. And that if I wait long enough, they pass.

    Therefore, I attempt to defer executive decisions during these periods, knowing that I am under the influence of elements outside the fully-functional intellectual, logical processes I try to routinely use.

    I'm sorta like Scarlet O'Hara, who doesn't want to think about a difficult problem today, who'll think about it tomorrow. But while that may appear to be simply avoidance & procrastination, I've learned that deferring can be an excellent tactic, to buy myself some time until I recharge my batteries, reevaluate the situation adequately, and, if I understand this article correctly, restore my ego following depletion.
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    Apr 18, 2012 2:26 PM GMT


    Interesting study, although personally I find the word ego is so loaded with meanings; many people have their own opinion of what ego is.

    It would have interesting to have had another control group where each received a letter prior stating that their accomplishments and personalities were exemplary etc and then subjected them to the rejection process in the study.

    -Doug

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    Apr 18, 2012 2:57 PM GMT
    meninlove said

    Interesting study, although personally I find the word ego is so loaded with meanings; many people have their own opinion of what ego is.

    It would have interesting to have had another control group where each received a letter prior stating that their accomplishments and personalities were exemplary etc and then subjected them to the rejection process in the study.

    -Doug



    Well in psychological theory of id vs ego, the definition is that the ego is the compromise between our "id" which is our impulsive, uncontrolled nature which knows nothing but direct desire for gratification, and the "superego" which is sort of like a conscience that tells us that some of the things we want are "wrong" i.e. stealing food from someone else. Thus, the ego compromises by delaying the gratification of that direct desire.. say, for instance, you want a car, ut you cant afford one, so instead of just taking a car you want, you work and save up for it, thus delaying the gratification of the desire. this, in psychological theory, is the ego.. its that compromising level between desire and conscience
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    Apr 18, 2012 3:04 PM GMT
    GreenHopper said
    meninlove said

    Interesting study, although personally I find the word ego is so loaded with meanings; many people have their own opinion of what ego is.

    It would have interesting to have had another control group where each received a letter prior stating that their accomplishments and personalities were exemplary etc and then subjected them to the rejection process in the study.

    -Doug



    Well in psychological theory of id vs ego, the definition is that the ego is the compromise between our "id" which is our impulsive, uncontrolled nature which knows nothing but direct desire for gratification, and the "superego" which is sort of like a conscience that tells us that some of the things we want are "wrong" i.e. stealing food from someone else. Thus, the ego compromises by delaying the gratification of that direct desire.. say, for instance, you want a car, ut you cant afford one, so instead of just taking a car you want, you work and save up for it, thus delaying the gratification of the desire. this, in psychological theory, is the ego.. its that compromising level between desire and conscience



    ...and in the study ego seems to be all about self esteem and perception of value of self worth affecting confidence and performance.

    ...and then there's this definition of ego from Meriam Webster:

    "the self especially as contrasted with another self or the world"
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    Apr 18, 2012 3:11 PM GMT
    meninlove said
    GreenHopper said
    meninlove said

    Interesting study, although personally I find the word ego is so loaded with meanings; many people have their own opinion of what ego is.

    It would have interesting to have had another control group where each received a letter prior stating that their accomplishments and personalities were exemplary etc and then subjected them to the rejection process in the study.

    -Doug



    Well in psychological theory of id vs ego, the definition is that the ego is the compromise between our "id" which is our impulsive, uncontrolled nature which knows nothing but direct desire for gratification, and the "superego" which is sort of like a conscience that tells us that some of the things we want are "wrong" i.e. stealing food from someone else. Thus, the ego compromises by delaying the gratification of that direct desire.. say, for instance, you want a car, ut you cant afford one, so instead of just taking a car you want, you work and save up for it, thus delaying the gratification of the desire. this, in psychological theory, is the ego.. its that compromising level between desire and conscience



    ...and in the study ego seems to be all about self esteem and perception of value of self worth affecting confidence and performance.

    ...and then there's this definition of ego from Meriam Webster:

    "the self especially as contrasted with another self or the world"


    Hmm, i could see why they would make that link... well since the ego is really "self-control" in the Freudian term, as self-control was alluded to in the article, they may have decided to use the term "ego" to mean "self-confidence" and use the term "self-control" on its own. The two are theoretically linked, as someone who can exert bettter self-control is likely also to be more effective in society and thus have more self-confidence etc, as they are better able to balance their own desires with societal norms. Though personally, I do not like this mixing of those terms like that, and the immediate assumption that more self-control means more self-esteem, that premise to me seems false, but then thats just what I think. Not all psychologists agree with Freud obviiously
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    Apr 20, 2012 12:17 AM GMT
    Are we looking at one explanation for why many guys who claim to ALWAYS adhere to 'safer' sex, get their will-power worn down and then just go for Bareback sex?

    Gay life is full of rejection, you need lots of willpower to stay on your diet, stay away from sweets, stay upbeat etc