delta-32 mutation test?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 24, 2012 1:52 AM GMT
    While studying genetics today, I came across the gene delta 32 mutation which basically prevents HIV and other diseases. From what I read, it is mostly found in from people who lived in the North/Northwestern region of Europe. I am intrigued on how I can get tested to see if I have this mutation being both sides of my parents are from Ireland.

    From what I found searching the internet, it is rare to get tested for it unless it is being conducted as research. I call b.s. Does anyone know where I can find out if I have this mutation that prevents HIV?
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    Apr 24, 2012 2:40 AM GMT
    I wrote a research paper on this for biology the summer I joined realjock, oddly enough. I do not have any information on where you can get it tested, but I can imagine that they could probably map out your genome about now. However, like I said- I am not certain.
  • dyslogistic

    Posts: 24

    Apr 24, 2012 2:46 AM GMT
    23andme provides genetic testing as a panel, one of which is the delta 32 mutation.
  • builtthick1

    Posts: 40

    Apr 29, 2012 10:37 PM GMT
    It is a very tiny percentage of people who have this mutation that apparently causes "immunity" to HIV. About 2% of HIV+ people actually become infected with the virus, but the virus causes no harm. One theory is that these few people had ancestors who survived during one of the major plagues.
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    Apr 29, 2012 10:39 PM GMT
    Yeah the mutation comes from ancestors in Europe who survived the Black Death. It's an incredibly rare condition.

    As a side note, if you get a bone marrow transplant from someone with this gene, you acquire the same immunities.
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    Apr 29, 2012 10:48 PM GMT
    It should be noted that the delta32 SNP only make you highly resistant to the most common variant of HIV - not all of them. Some HIV variants are not as dependent on CCR5 (the protein in which the delta32 mutation has been shown to confer resistance to HIV) to enter your cells and can still cause infection and eventually AIDS.
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    Apr 29, 2012 10:57 PM GMT
    Larkin saidYeah the mutation comes from ancestors in Europe who survived the Black Death. It's an incredibly rare condition.

    As a side note, if you get a bone marrow transplant from someone with this gene, you acquire the same immunities.


    Seems like there was at least one case where the bone-marrow transplant (containing the delta-32 gene) cured them of HIV.

    Quote from wikipedia:

    "A bone marrow transplant containing stem cells from a matched donor was then used to restore the immune system. However, the transplant was performed from a donor with 2 copies of CCR5-Δ32 mutation gene. After 600 days, the patient was healthy and had undetectable levels of HIV in the blood and in examined brain and rectal tissues.[17][18] Before the transplant, low levels of HIV X4, which does not use the CCR5 receptor, were also detected. Following the transplant, however, this type of HIV was not detected either, further baffling doctors.[18] However, this is consistent with the observation that cells expressing the CCR5-Δ32 variant protein lack both the CCR5 and CXCR4 receptors on their surfaces, thereby conferring resistance to a broad range of HIV variants including HIV X4.[19] After three years, the patient has maintained the resistance to HIV and has been pronounced cured of the HIV infection."
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    May 01, 2012 1:12 AM GMT
    Only in a research setting at this point. People who have HIV can get a "trophile" test to test for the presence of the CCR5 viral protein for CCR5 receptor on host CD4 cells. If you are HIV positive and you have a CCR5 tropic virus then the drug Maraviroc will block the CCR5 receptor on your CD4 cells and effectively bar HIV from entering into your cells. People who have the delta-32 mutation do not express CCR5 receptors and effectively "cannot" be infected by a CCR5 or 'R5' virus....however they still CAN be infected by an HIV I strain with affinity for the RX4 receptor. This strain of HIV (an 'X4' virus) is becoming more common as people are continuing to not be fully adherent to HAART regimens, and still having unprotected sex with people who are not fully adherent to HAART. So it may be useful to be tested for your delta-32 expression. However, we still can't have unprotected sex. You CAN still be infected with an X4 virus. But think of the possibilities that may lie ahead with the experience of our "Berlin" patient...very encouraging!!! Be safe! :-)
  • conservativej...

    Posts: 2465

    May 01, 2012 1:17 AM GMT
    friendlyfiree saidWhile studying genetics today, I came across the gene delta 32 mutation which basically prevents HIV and other diseases. From what I read, it is mostly found in from people who lived in the North/Northwestern region of Europe. I am intrigued on how I can get tested to see if I have this mutation being both sides of my parents are from Ireland.

    From what I found searching the internet, it is rare to get tested for it unless it is being conducted as research. I call b.s. Does anyone know where I can find out if I have this mutation that prevents HIV?


    I was tested in Zurich in 1989, when friends were dropping around me like mad. I lost 45 friends in the course of 4 years, yet I had not tested positive. As it turns out, both my parents carried the delta32 mutation. Dad's family were originally from the York, England are and mom was Swiss.

    Good luck!!