Shins Hurt While Running?

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    Apr 24, 2012 4:13 AM GMT
    During my runs, my shins/ankles hurt early on they feel fine before and after just while running and slightly lighten the pain during the run. Does anyone know what this is? I stretch before and after the run so I'm a bit confused and worried.
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    Apr 24, 2012 7:22 AM GMT
    Sounds like shin splints. After your run, if they still hurt, run your fingers up and down the sides of your shins for no more than a few minutes. I don't think any amount of stretching will help.

    Edit: http://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/shin-splints
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    Apr 24, 2012 11:44 AM GMT
    shin splints, tey will eventually go away but you have to work through it and keep running, its nothing serious and totally normal
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    Apr 24, 2012 11:58 AM GMT
    Yeah, sounds like shin splints...

    http://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/shin-splints
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    Apr 25, 2012 1:57 AM GMT
    Or trying different running shoes. Do you know what type of runner you are? Figure that out and then buy a pair of shoes based on how you run.
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    Apr 25, 2012 2:09 PM GMT
    Oh the ole SS!!!

    Make sure to massage and stretch calves (often a cause of shin splints).
    After the run, massage legs and "knead" the calves.
    Lastly. run your hands along the shin and try to push/massage the muscle away from the bone (with light pressure).

    Sadly, they pain most runners and they are off and on. I have been running for over 20 years and I still get them off and on. Good luck and keep stretching and massaging!
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  • Drift

    Posts: 217

    Apr 25, 2012 2:49 PM GMT

    I wouldn't agree with the advice above to push through it. In my experience, and those of other dancers that I have met, shin splints are not something that go away with repeated stresses. Rather, that will further aggravate the sheath surrounding the tibia, and cause further inflammation. If this continues to get worse, it can develop into stress fractures, and in extreme cases into compartment syndrome. Rest. Ice if inflamed. Elevate the legs (lying on the floor with legs up on wall) after any exercise, to help the blood drain from the legs. This will feel quite strange, especially if you're getting quite a lot of pain. Basically, the more the calves get tight, and the blood gets locked into them, then the more stress that places on the connections to the bone, as you run (repetitive impact). So these tactics, as well as massaging the blood out of the calves, will help.

    Another aspect, is making sure that your legs and feet are tracking properly in alignment, so that strange stresses aren't being put through your shins. Check when you're extending your legs and feet, that this action happens in a straight line. When bending your knees while standing, make sure that your knees are tracking directly over your ankles and toes, and not twisting either way.
    Lastly, when the pain lessens with some rest, start to do calf rises to strengthen your calves and ankles. This will help with the tracking, and also absorption of the impact. Use your feet when your run, and don't rely purely on padded running shoes.

    Hope this helps.
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    Apr 25, 2012 3:00 PM GMT
    Shin splints are nothing more than eccentric muscle tearing of the tibialis anterior. The tibialis anterior is the muscle next to your shin (tibia). Its action is to elevate the foot. In running however, it gets worked eccentrically due to the foot landing on the heel, causing a lowering of the foot that you work against using this muscle. It's basically instant delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) caused by eccentric damage to the tibialis anterior.

    Couple things you can do:
    1) competitive runners tend to be underweight for height. This means that even if they do land on their heals, the tibialis anterior has much less force to deal with just from lack of weight per step. The amount of force this muscle has to deal with by the end of the run is exponentially less. So you can lose weight by finding a diet to lose weight (running doesn't cause weight loss--diet does).
    2) Run on your toes. In fact, if you run sprints, which heavier people tend to be better at than lighter 'runner' builds, then you will be running on your toes anyways.
    3) Change your running form. Land less on your heals, and don't activate your tibialis anterior muscle as much.

    WebMD doesn't know what shin spints are, as evidenced by lack of any decent explanation.
  • Drift

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    Apr 25, 2012 3:23 PM GMT
    Hey Bluey2223, may I ask where your information is coming from?
    I'm a little confused as to your explanation though, because the Tibialis Anterior is on the lateral side of the tibia, and the experience of myself and dancers I know is that the pain and tenderness is centred on the medial side. As we move almost primarily without a heel strike, then the explanation above does not seem to fit. Do you have another possibility?

    MarkRoger, where is your pain? i've also misread and assumed the pain was all in your shins, but you also mention ankles.
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    Apr 26, 2012 1:51 PM GMT
    Raise your arms over your head and reach for the sky, suck in your gut an tuck in your butt like your holding a coin between your cheeks. Now lower your arms and try running, keeping your stance tall. If your shins don't hurt it's your running form and thats what you need to work on.If thats the case anytime your shins start to hurt stop or slow down and get your form back until it becomes natural for you. Hope this helpsicon_smile.gif
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    Apr 26, 2012 2:01 PM GMT
    Try Dr Scholls athletic soles, they help absorb extra shock and keeps it easier.
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    Apr 27, 2012 6:50 AM GMT
    Shin splints are no fun. I got them occasionally in gymnastics, especially when I trained vault a little too much. Running and jumping on a spring board multiple times definitely took a toll on my shins after a while. I simply learned to do fewer runs on the vault and massage my shins while resting.
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    Apr 27, 2012 7:04 AM GMT
    ya man those would be shin splints!
    had 'em before after running for so long - ice 'em and stop running on concrete/asphalt (without proper attire)