108th anniversary of lifting the ban of Lithuanian in Lithuania

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 24, 2012 4:56 AM GMT
    Hurrah that the Lithuanian language survived despite various periods of Russian oppression!

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lithuanian_press_ban

    Funny thing is now, ethnic Russians, Ukrainians, Belarusians, and Poles in Lithuania have to know Lithuanian in order to get a passport icon_wink.gif

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    Apr 24, 2012 5:09 AM GMT
    Too bad the "American" language (ie. bastardized King's English) couldn't survive. Last week I learned lots of Spanish/Portuguese/Cubano/Mix (ie. Spanglish). Seems that's gonna be the new language of the US soon. icon_lol.gif
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    Apr 24, 2012 5:13 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidToo bad the "American" language (ie. bastardized King's English) couldn't survive. Last week I learned lots of Spanish/Portuguese/Cubano/Mix (ie. Spanglish). Seems that's gonna be the new language of the US soon. icon_lol.gif


    LOL. English in America will survive no matter how many immigrants we take in. The children of current immigrants will be more proficient in English than in their parents' language. That's pretty much what always happens in immigrant communities. The ancestral language is usually lost by the second or third generation.

    Lithuania has fared better than the other Baltic republics in having their ethnic minorities learn Lithuanian.
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    Apr 24, 2012 12:35 PM GMT
    Yes. I really don't think we need to worry about the survival of English. There may be a few more Spanish borrowings, just as we have borrowed from previous immigrant languages, like Italian, Yiddish and German.