Effects of sun exposure

  • tgrissom0312

    Posts: 91

    Apr 26, 2012 1:15 PM GMT
    This is not intended to be negative towards older guys. Please know that I love my silver foxes...icon_biggrin.gif

    But have you ever seen just a cock pic of a guy and assumed that it was a guy in his 20s-early 30s? and then they unlock and its a guy in his 60s?

    I always laugh about that and it's like "Dicks Don't Age!" lol

    I think that its a true testament to the effects of not wearing sun block.
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    Apr 26, 2012 1:41 PM GMT
    It's true. Same with asses.icon_twisted.gif

    Anyway, if you want to slow aging and keep your skin healthy, sunblock sunblock sunblock. I wish I'd have known that when I was younger, I might have avoided a round of basal cell carcinoma.

    And, as your skin starts toshow the effects of sun exposure, a lot of it can be helped by regularly using Retin A/tretinoin.

    Sunblock + Retin A = the only thing proven to keep your skin looking younger. (Jeez, I sound like a cosmetics commercial.)
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    Apr 26, 2012 1:46 PM GMT
    showme said
    And, as your skin starts toshow the effects of sun exposure, a lot of it can be helped by regularly using Retin A/tretinoin.
    Do you get it by prescription or over-the-counter?
  • laxdude25

    Posts: 604

    Apr 26, 2012 1:48 PM GMT
    I just turned 57 after a lifetime of sailing and skiing. Fortunately, my parents were early adopters of sunblock use, so we were slathered with "Sea and Ski" (no longer on the market), wore baseball caps and Ray Bans way before it was cool (my Dad was a navigator in the Navy). And have always drunk lots of water and no smoking ever, and post shower moisturizer (nothing fancy required). And now, as you have pointed out, Retin A. But so far no skin cancer (I get checked regularly), and I'm not too bad on the leather skin and wrinkle scale.

    Yeah, I know I'm a headless torso, but if anyone wants to see the face pix just ask me to unlock. icon_razz.gif
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    Apr 26, 2012 1:49 PM GMT
    This! I fear that we put too much faith in sunblock. But, I'm cautious enough to be significantly deficient in vitaminD levels.

    First warm and sunny day in Seattle. Drove by a young woman holding a sign for a mattress store standing outside, working on upgrading from first to third-degree sunburn. As a recovering San Diego resident, I have extra sunscreen tubes floating around under my car seats. Drove around the block and gave her one.

    People are idiots up here.
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    Apr 26, 2012 1:50 PM GMT
    Also, not just sunblock, but lotion/moisturizing period. I cover myself in lotion head to toe after every shower.

    I get a lot of compliments while naked about how smooth and nice my skin is.
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    Apr 26, 2012 1:59 PM GMT
    Depends what kind of sunscreens.
    They are saying now that synthetic vitamin a found in sunscreens and Anti aging creams spread tumor growth.

    What you eat is obviously going to have an effect on your skin/body's natural defense against the sun.
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    Apr 26, 2012 1:59 PM GMT
    RunintheCity saidAlso, not just sunblock, but lotion/moisturizing period. I cover myself in lotion head to toe after every shower.

    I get a lot of compliments while naked about how smooth and nice my skin is.


    Yes, yes, yes! Moisturizing is key.

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    Apr 26, 2012 2:04 PM GMT
    Nivek said
    showme said
    And, as your skin starts toshow the effects of sun exposure, a lot of it can be helped by regularly using Retin A/tretinoin.
    Do you get it by prescription or over-the-counter?


    In the US, it's prescription. The "list price" at the pharmacy can be a little pricey but if you use one of those prescription discount cards (google for info) the price goes way down.

    You can also order it from an overseas pharmacy.

    There are over-the-counter retinoid ingredients that are not quite as effective that you can also try - retinol (least effective) and retinaldehyde (more effective). They're mostly in products marketed to women, though, if that bothers you.

    You have to use it for at least 6 months to a year to start showing results. In the beginning it can irritate and dry your skin, too (i.e., might look worse before it gets better). Talk to your dermatologist or use the google.
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    Apr 26, 2012 2:05 PM GMT
    RunintheCity said
    I get a lot of compliments while naked about how smooth and nice my skin is.


    Hmm, I bet you do.icon_twisted.gif
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    Apr 26, 2012 2:07 PM GMT


    What you eat is obviously going to have an effect on your skin/body's natural defense against the sun. [/quote]eat lots of berries - natural sun block
  • great_scott

    Posts: 519

    Apr 26, 2012 2:11 PM GMT
    This is actually one time where it's okay to go raw for a little while. A lot of Americans are D deficient. Go without the block for about 15 min. Assuming you might live longer than the average gay guy, D deficiency can cause a bunch of health concerns when you get older. It's no joke!
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    Apr 26, 2012 2:15 PM GMT
    great_scott saidThis is actually one time where it's okay to go raw for a little while. A lot of Americans are D deficient. Go without the block for about 15 min. Assuming you might live longer than the average gay guy, D deficiency can cause a bunch of health concerns when you get older. It's no joke!


    Or just supplement with oral D-3 from the drugstore.
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19138

    Apr 26, 2012 2:16 PM GMT
    showme said

    And, as your skin starts toshow the effects of sun exposure, a lot of it can be helped by regularly using Retin A/tretinoin.


    ^^^ This ^^^ --- Retin-A is one of the best skin products I have ever found. It does take about 6 months to see really good results, but they are pretty dramatic once it kicks in to improve skin tone and texture.
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    Apr 26, 2012 2:21 PM GMT
    CuriousJockAZ said
    showme said

    And, as your skin starts toshow the effects of sun exposure, a lot of it can be helped by regularly using Retin A/tretinoin.


    ^^^ This ^^^ --- Retin-A is one of the best skin products I have ever found. It does take about 6 months to see really good results, but they are pretty dramatic once it kicks in to improve skin tone and texture.


    Maybe the only thing CJAZ and I will ever agree on, so pay attention, boys.icon_wink.gif
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    Apr 26, 2012 2:34 PM GMT
    At 55 my skin tone is mostly fine with no supplements other than vitamins, but for my hands which fucking freak me out, but that's the arthritis.

    My problem with skin was a lifetime of boating in the tropics and especially snorkling with my back just baking. Mom was an advocate of sunscreen even though I don't recall that when I was younger there was any known connection to skin cancer or anything of the sort. In fact, the thinking then was that once you had a tan you no longer had to worry about getting burned. Being an indestructible kid, I always refused lotion.

    So no skin cancers but I've got spots possibly from sun exposure. They started I think in my 40s. At first they really bothered me, I had doctors checking them. Dumb. They're nothing and I've gotten used to my blotchy skin. It goes very well with my grey hair. Oh, and mom wound up with blotchy skin too, even though she was always using the best available sun blocks. So I don't know if this stuff isn't more genetic than environmental.

    As far as dicks still looking good as we age, that probably has more to do with the suppleness of the skin down there then any sun exposure issues.
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    Apr 26, 2012 2:38 PM GMT
    I was an office mole for thirty years and it shows. (Compare my recent pics with my age.)
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    Apr 26, 2012 2:48 PM GMT
    Yup ! The sun is the biggest premature skin ager next to cigarette smoking.

    I've worn sunscreen everyday since I was in my teens and I think that's why I usually get mistaken for someone younger.

    I'm manic about my skincare so I always use sunscreen, moisturiser and a serum for the daytime and at night I use glycolic acid peels and a really rich night cream + vitamin C powder.

    When I go on holiday I never sunbathe and spend most of my time in the shade reading/drinking. Never been a sun worshiper and my skin thanks me for it.

    This for me is the best sunscreen on the market.

    anthelios.jpg
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    Apr 26, 2012 2:52 PM GMT
    I look older than my age because I went bald at 21. I still wear hats and sunscreen as much as possible or highly limit the sun exposure. I didn't get back into the habit though because the past month I've developed a slight arm tan since the sun came out again intensely this month. (here I basically wear sunscreen from March/April thru October)

    I'm sure it will even out by the time I'm 40 I will still look the same thanks to balding early icon_smile.gif

    Fellas? Non-aging boyfriend? Here!
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    Apr 26, 2012 4:37 PM GMT
    great_scott saidThis is actually one time where it's okay to go raw for a little while. A lot of Americans are D deficient. Go without the block for about 15 min. Assuming you might live longer than the average gay guy, D deficiency can cause a bunch of health concerns when you get older. It's no joke!


    I don't think going out without sunblock on one's face is ever necessary to get vitamin D from sunshine. There's enough skin on one's arms and legs.
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    Apr 26, 2012 4:40 PM GMT
    A lot of foods now have vitamin D added, too. Hell, most brands of milk and other dairy products add vitamin D these days.
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    Apr 26, 2012 4:46 PM GMT
    whateveryo saidYup ! The sun is the biggest premature skin ager next to cigarette smoking.

    I've worn sunscreen everyday since I was in my teens and I think that's why I usually get mistaken for someone younger.

    I'm manic about my skincare so I always use sunscreen, moisturiser and a serum for the daytime and at night I use glycolic acid peels and a really rich night cream + vitamin C powder.

    When I go on holiday I never sunbathe and spend most of my time in the shade reading/drinking. Never been a sun worshiper and my skin thanks me for it.

    This for me is the best sunscreen on the market.

    anthelios.jpg


    Do you really even have anything to worry about in the UK with the sun coming out like once or twice a year? icon_lol.gif
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    Apr 26, 2012 4:53 PM GMT
    Because it's ok to brag about oneself in this thread, I'll succumb to the temptation--and add something to the conversation. icon_lol.gif

    I'm often considered much younger than I actually am. Whatever visible youthfulness I've managed to retain so far is due to doing everything you guys have mentioned already (e.g., using a good moisturizer, using sunscreen, avoiding sunshine, etc.).

    But there's something else: using eye cream. I started using eye cream in high school because I discovered eye cream was the one thing that alleviated the dryness and tearing that I started experiencing as a high-school junior. Since then, I've continued using eye cream and have managed to avoid crow's feet, bags, extreme puffiness, etc. I'm not sure how long I'll remain lucky. But I know I'd be worse off without eye cream.
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    Apr 26, 2012 4:53 PM GMT
    pocketnico said

    Do you really even have anything to worry about in the UK with the sun coming out like once or twice a year? icon_lol.gif


    You should wear it all year round no matter the weather.

    UVA rays (the ones that age you) can travel through pretty much anything and that includes rain clouds. So even if it's a miserable non sunny day you gotta wear your sunscreen man, 365 days a year.
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    Apr 26, 2012 5:21 PM GMT
    BlkMuscleGent saidBecause it's ok to brag about oneself in this thread, I'll succumb to the temptation--and add something to the conversation. icon_lol.gif

    I'm often considered much younger than I actually am. Whatever visible youthfulness I've managed to retain so far is due to doing everything you guys have mentioned already (e.g., using a good moisturizer, using sunscreen, avoiding sunshine, etc.).

    But there's something else: using eye cream. I started using eye cream in high school because I discovered eye cream was the one thing that alleviated the dryness and tearing that I started experiencing as a high-school junior. Since then, I've continued using eye cream and have managed to avoid crow's feet, bags, extreme puffiness, etc. I'm not sure how long I'll remain lucky. But I know I'd be worse off without eye cream.


    Don't make me say it, BMG - someone will yell at me. But you know what I'm thinking.

    [He convinced me not to say it.]