muscular/muscled

  • tallchris

    Posts: 121

    Jul 18, 2008 10:47 PM GMT
    what's the difference?
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    Jul 19, 2008 1:24 AM GMT
    ones a verb, the other is an adjective icon_biggrin.gif Do I graduate??
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    Jul 19, 2008 1:24 AM GMT
    ActiveAndFit saidones a verb, the other is an adjective icon_biggrin.gif Do I graduate??


    ROFL!
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    Jul 19, 2008 1:34 AM GMT
    ActiveAndFit saidones a verb, the other is an adjective icon_biggrin.gif Do I graduate??


    Um, they're both adjectives commonly, though I suppose you could use "muscled" as a verb, as in, "He muscled his way through the dense crowd", but that's not the sense of the word he intended.

    Go clap erasers.
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    Jul 19, 2008 1:37 AM GMT
    jprichva saidUm, they're both adjectives commonly, though I suppose you could use "muscled" as a verb, as in, "He muscled his way through the dense crowd", but that's not the sense of the word he intended.

    Go clap erasers.

    I was never known for being common, but hey, I don't write the dictionary, I just read it (and cut and paste it).

    mus·cle (msl)
    n.
    1. A tissue composed of fibers capable of contracting to effect bodily movement.
    2. A contractile organ consisting of a special bundle of muscle tissue, which moves a particular bone, part, or substance of the body: the heart muscle; the muscles of the arm.
    3. Muscular strength: enough muscle to be a high jumper.
    4. Informal Power or authority: put some muscle into law enforcement.
    v. mus·cled, mus·cling, mus·cles Informal
    v.intr.
    To make one's way by or as if by force: muscled into the conversation.
    v.tr.
    To move or force with strength: muscled legislation through Congress.
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    Jul 19, 2008 1:45 AM GMT
    The well-muscled man muscled his way through the muscular crowd, muscling the courage to talk to the thick-muscled muscle who guarded the door.
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    Jul 19, 2008 1:46 AM GMT
    a high school diploma?
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    Jul 19, 2008 1:50 AM GMT
    VineyardHmo saida high school diploma?
    Certainly! does it come with a kiss?
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    Jul 19, 2008 3:20 AM GMT
    mickeytopogigio saidThe well-muscled man muscled his way through the muscular crowd, muscling the courage to talk to the thick-muscled muscle who guarded the door.
    Well said Dr. Thuess.
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    Jul 19, 2008 6:17 AM GMT
    mickeytopogigio saidThe well-muscled man muscled his way through the muscular crowd, muscling the courage to talk to the thick-muscled muscle who guarded the door.


    muscling? the more accurate word here would be mustering.
    to muster is defined as the act of assembling.
    you would assemble courage, not muscle it.

    all your other uses are, although considered informal, technically correct.
    even your use of hyphens is correct!

    kudos.
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    Jul 19, 2008 6:24 AM GMT
    Thanks!

    archy is impressed that you could hold the shift key down and stamp on the question mark. his head hurts from typing this.
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    Jul 19, 2008 12:27 PM GMT
    mickeytopogigio saidThanks!

    archy is impressed that you could hold the shift key down and stamp on the question mark. his head hurts from typing this.


    now mehitabel dont be snarky
    apostrophes require shift buttons too ya know
  • MisterT

    Posts: 1272

    Jul 19, 2008 12:55 PM GMT
    hmm, apostrophes don't require shift for me, maybe you have an odd keyboard, exclamations points do though, see !!!

    just playing,

    hugs

    muscular and muscled may have different definitions, but the use of the two words are generally interchangeable on this site, ie.. "I want a muscular man" is same as "I want a muscled man" It can be fun to get technical and watch reactions tough icon_twisted.gif
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    Jul 19, 2008 2:15 PM GMT
    MisterT saidhmm, apostrophes don't require shift for me, maybe you have an odd keyboard, exclamations points do though, see !!!


    archy still types on an old remington manual typewriter

    this may be before your time
  • tallchris

    Posts: 121

    May 09, 2009 11:38 PM GMT
    OK, this went WAY off topic, and I am none the wiser. Have another go, please, guys: what is the difference in meaning between muscled and muscular? They are both adjectives, by the way, though muscled is a past participle used adjectivally. Muscular is a proper word. Muscled is a neologism in this context, and I get the impression it was invented in Gaydom. But how does it differ in meaning from muscular?
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    May 10, 2009 12:02 AM GMT
    tallchris saidOK, this went WAY off topic, and I am none the wiser. Have another go, please, guys: what is the difference in meaning between muscled and muscular? They are both adjectives, by the way, though muscled is a past participle used adjectivally. Muscular is a proper word. Muscled is a neologism in this context, and I get the impression it was invented in Gaydom. But how does it differ in meaning from muscular?


    in it´s neologistic use it means the same. It´s a matter of diction.