Does your basic bone structure and somatotype limit how big - or how strong you can get?

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    Apr 29, 2012 11:46 PM GMT
    I am wondering about this as I seem to be having a VERY hard time breaking through a few barriers:

    Bench Press: 205# 1RM (my goal is to be able to do a 5x5 @225#... but I seem to be stalling at 5x5 @175#

    Squats (done to parallel) : 270# 1RM - low back/sciatic issues are forcing me to take a medium weight-ish (60-75% of 1RM) for high reps to try to maintain my strength

    Overhead Press: (legs are static, not a push press) 5x5 @105# (untested for 1RM)

    Deadlifts: 5x5 @275, Est. 1RM @315# ...also fearing pushing this due to aggravating the old L5-S1 disc herniation.

    So I'm basically wondering if I should continue on the 5x5 strength training range of 80-90% of 1RM, or go back to a more typical "hypertrophy" regime of 3x(8-10) ranges at around 70% of 1RM?

    The latter might be suitable for a change-up, and for giving my low back a rest, and perhaps work on the "beach/disco tits", (and arms) lol...
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    Apr 30, 2012 5:56 AM GMT
    Of course you need to go back to hypertrophy mode! You're never big enough in America!
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    Apr 30, 2012 6:14 AM GMT
    bachian saidOf course you need to go back to hypertrophy mode! You're never big enough in America!


    Shush! I see your photos, big boy.
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    Apr 30, 2012 6:28 AM GMT
    AlphaTrigger saidI am wondering about this as I seem to be having a VERY hard time breaking through a few barriers:

    Bench Press: 205# 1RM (my goal is to be able to do a 5x5 @225#... but I seem to be stalling at 5x5 @175#

    Squats (done to parallel) : 270# 1RM - low back/sciatic issues are forcing me to take a medium weight-ish (60-75% of 1RM) for high reps to try to maintain my strength

    Overhead Press: (legs are static, not a push press) 5x5 @105# (untested for 1RM)

    Deadlifts: 5x5 @275, Est. 1RM @315# ...also fearing pushing this due to aggravating the old L5-S1 disc herniation.

    So I'm basically wondering if I should continue on the 5x5 strength training range of 80-90% of 1RM, or go back to a more typical "hypertrophy" regime of 3x(8-10) ranges at around 70% of 1RM?

    The latter might be suitable for a change-up, and for giving my low back a rest, and perhaps work on the "beach/disco tits", (and arms) lol...


    Either you need a week break from your routine, or change it altogether.
    My body seems to respond well to change of program every few months, and LESS exercises, to avoid overtraining and stress on my wrists.
    When in doubt, ask Spiritreaver! icon_biggrin.gif
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    Apr 30, 2012 5:52 PM GMT
    I assume you are asking about breaking barriers in terms of strength and size. It all depends on where you are in terms of your your training.

    If you are at an advanced/elite level then getting bigger and stronger is going to be a slow process. But I assume that you are already aware of that point. So how do you determine where you are? Here is some info for you:

    maximum-muscular-potential

    scroll down to the 'Progress and Goals' section on this page
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    Apr 30, 2012 7:26 PM GMT
    TellMeMoar saidI assume you are asking about breaking barriers in terms of strength and size. It all depends on where you are in terms of your your training.

    If you are at an advanced/elite level then getting bigger and stronger is going to be a slow process. But I assume that you are already aware of that point. So how do you determine where you are? Here is some info for you:

    maximum-muscular-potential

    scroll down to the 'Progress and Goals' section on this page


    Very nice! It's very important for bodybuilders to educate themselves on maximum (natural) muscular development and the law of diminishing returns. Many newbies think they can gain 12lbs per year forever (and despise steroid users on the premise that they didn't have enough patience)
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    Apr 30, 2012 7:39 PM GMT
    I don't think so. I'm pretty strong for my size, and I only feel like within the last few months my muscle composition has been catching up to that. The key for me is diet.

    If you don't eat enough and the right types of nutrients.. how can you expect to have the energy to push yourself through to the next level?

    You also use a lot of words like stalling, [things] "forcing" you, and "fear".. These are psychological words. Maybe its more a mental thing?

    Of course you do have physical problems with L5-S1, maybe you should try racked deadlifts instead. They allow you to lift a lot more, and take the force off your lower back as you're starting past the lock out phase.
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    May 01, 2012 3:29 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidI have been lifting for over twenty years and I pretty much gained my strength after lifting steadily for about five years. I can alter my body 'size' with diet but as far as strength, not really.


    But if anyone knows, by all means, please share!


    Size is primarily a bodybuilder focus.

    Strength is primarily a Power lifter focus.

    You will need to change your training focus to develop/increase strength. A noob could do both and see results. At at your level you need to pick a goal and change your training accordingly.