Do any of you find that your flexibility increases with a "sports massage" or other massage at your gym or by a professional masseuse?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 03, 2012 2:57 AM GMT
    I just had one and it made me FEEL good, but I don't know if it did anything for my body.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 03, 2012 4:19 AM GMT
    Yes, definitely. If your MT knows what he's doing, he will help get your body in better alignment. A temporary fix--we tend to fall back into old patterns of movement--but I find a good massage really helps. But I've also had a lot of not-so-good massages that offer nothing more than relaxation.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 03, 2012 4:33 AM GMT
    I stretch before, during and after my workouts. I don't get a little more limber, but wouldn't be able to see the difference in results.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 03, 2012 4:42 AM GMT
    BRIX saidYes, definitely. If your MT knows what he's doing, he will help get your body in better alignment. A temporary fix--we tend to fall back into old patterns of movement--but I find a good massage really helps. But I've also had a lot of not-so-good massages that offer nothing more than relaxation.


    not-so-good massages that offer nothing more than relaxation? gosh, you must have high standards.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 03, 2012 4:55 AM GMT
    Those are the MTs that don't get my repeat business, nevs. What's the point of that? Find a good MT and stick with him is my advice. So, yeah, in fact, I do have high standards.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 03, 2012 5:27 AM GMT
    Does anyone know of any studies providing evidence one way or another?

    Also, is $84 with tip too much for 55 minutes? The rate is $70 and I gave a 20% tip.
  • DanOmatic

    Posts: 1155

    May 03, 2012 11:31 AM GMT
    I can only speak from my own experience, but I find that a combination of doing yoga regularly (at least 1x a week) and deep tissue massage about once every 3-4 weeks has made a HUGE difference in my flexibility, and it has completely eliminated those nagging pains that come from being a 47 year-old competitive athlete.

    Deep tissue massage is not necessarily a "feel good" massage while it's happening--sometimes it actually hurts. But it feels so great afterwards. I pay $100/hr and tip $15.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 03, 2012 4:41 PM GMT
    I couldn't agree with NC3Athlete more, except I'm 51. Find someone who knows what they are doing and see him/her regularly
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 04, 2012 7:43 PM GMT
    NC3athlete saidI can only speak from my own experience, but I find that a combination of doing yoga regularly (at least 1x a week) and deep tissue massage about once every 3-4 weeks has made a HUGE difference in my flexibility, and it has completely eliminated those nagging pains that come from being a 47 year-old competitive athlete.

    Deep tissue massage is not necessarily a "feel good" massage while it's happening--sometimes it actually hurts. But it feels so great afterwards. I pay $100/hr and tip $15.


    Is that $115 for an hour or?
  • sfjock11

    Posts: 52

    May 04, 2012 7:49 PM GMT
    yoga is the best (and cheapest) form of stretching/exercise. next best imho is a thai massage. typically the therapist will automatically incorporate stretching and yoga "type" moves into the session.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 04, 2012 8:26 PM GMT
    One of my favorite things!
    I don't know if massage helps with flexibility per se, but I have found that it does improve my training. My experience has been that it seems to 'break loose' the muscle fibers and helps stimulate growth afterwards.
    Plus it just feels good!
    My therapist does what she calls an "integrative" massage, which is a combination of deep tissue and Swedish techniques. I've been seeing her about every 6 weeks for a year now(appt. on Sunday!). She does private clients on the side- her primary job is medical massage- so her rates are extremely reasonable. She charges me $100 for a two hour session, and she gets a $25 tip because she always goes over on time and is willing to accommodate my schedule.
    $70 + tip/55 min. isn't a bad rate, a lot depends on your area. Shop around. I've paid as much as $240/90 min. in high- end spas. Of course, that gets you all the amenities as well.
    And as BRIX said, once you find a good therapist that you like, stick with him/her. The therapist will get to know your body's responses, you'll become more used to the therapist and therefore more relaxed, thus getting more out of the experience.
    Enjoy!
  • muscletruk

    Posts: 109

    May 04, 2012 9:00 PM GMT
    FrankCA saidI couldn't agree with NC3Athlete more, except I'm 51. Find someone who knows what they are doing and see him/her regularly

    +1 I'm 48
    I have a great MT and it often hurts as he works out the knots. as to the flexibility I don't know that it helps persay but it relieves and or eliminates the pain when I lift. I also stretch the muscles I'm working before during and a full body stretch after.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 05, 2012 3:52 AM GMT
    Massage relaxes muscle fibers that have bonded together (ie. tightened to the point that they will not relax naturally).
    It does not increase flexibility, except for the fact that relaxed muscles can stretch further than tight muscles.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 05, 2012 7:30 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidMassage relaxes muscle fibers that have bonded together (ie. tightened to the point that they will not relax naturally).
    It does not increase flexibility, except for the fact that relaxed muscles can stretch further than tight muscles.


    Thanks for the update.
  • DanOmatic

    Posts: 1155

    May 05, 2012 3:06 PM GMT
    swimguychicago said
    NC3athlete saidI can only speak from my own experience, but I find that a combination of doing yoga regularly (at least 1x a week) and deep tissue massage about once every 3-4 weeks has made a HUGE difference in my flexibility, and it has completely eliminated those nagging pains that come from being a 47 year-old competitive athlete.

    Deep tissue massage is not necessarily a "feel good" massage while it's happening--sometimes it actually hurts. But it feels so great afterwards. I pay $100/hr and tip $15.


    Is that $115 for an hour or?


    It's $100/hr, but I tip $15.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 07, 2012 2:50 AM GMT
    Yes. It makes a great difference in muscle recovery. There was a study on how massaging turn on genes that produce proteins/enzyme that help with muscle recovery. I find trading massages and tell my partner exactly what I need is the best.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 07, 2012 3:00 AM GMT
    BRIX said But I've also had a lot of not-so-good massages that offer nothing more than relaxation.


    First world problems. haha
    But I agree with this. I am not much a fan of the "relaxation" massages either. I was seeing this amazing MT until I moved. He was the only person I have been to who was actually able to give a real deep tissue massage and even used tools to dig deep enough into the muscle. Unfortunately I have had no luck finding a great MT here. Hopefully I find one soon though, I really miss getting massages icon_sad.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 08, 2012 1:15 PM GMT
    I'm a massage therapist.

    Of course massage can help with your flexibility. But it's not a quick fix.

    If you are someone who gets a massage once a year, you may feel good for a couple days after, but odds are you won't see any real improvement. If you don't keep up maintenance on your body, you will revert back to the state that you were in. For an athlete, once a month is the recommendation I would give.

    And BRIX- be sure you book the right type of massage. A traditinal Swedish massage will be the relaxing kind. It's flowing and soothing, without the deep work. If you are having issues, book the Deep Tissue. Deep Tissue may cost an extra ten bucks. A lot of therapists are sticklers with this. Deep Tissue is harder on our bodies as the service provider, and many will not just give that service without the extra bit of cash.

    In terms of cost... It varies. $80 for an hour or $100-ish for 90-minutes is common.