FDA favors first drug for HIV prevention

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    May 08, 2012 10:22 PM GMT
    FDA favors first drug for HIV prevention

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal drug regulators on Tuesday affirmed landmark study results showing that a popular HIV-fighting pill can also help healthy people avoid contracting the virus that causes AIDS in the first place. While the pill appears safe and effective for prevention, scientists stressed that it only works when taken on a daily basis.

    The Food and Drug Administration will hold a meeting Thursday to discuss whether Truvada should be approved for people who are at risks of contracting HIV through sexual intercourse. The agency's positive review posted Tuesday suggests the daily pill will become the first drug approved to prevent HIV infection in high-risk patients.
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    May 08, 2012 10:32 PM GMT
    Why is it when I read that what I immediately envision is

    "Nah dude you don't need a condom, I'm on the pill!"
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    May 09, 2012 12:04 AM GMT
    Ariodante saidWhy is it when I read that what I immediately envision is

    "Nah dude you don't need a condom, I'm on the pill!"


    Jajajaja! My same exact thoughts!
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    May 09, 2012 12:07 AM GMT
    Ariodante saidWhy is it when I read that what I immediately envision is

    "Nah dude you don't need a condom, I'm on the pill!"


    That was my thought too.
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    May 09, 2012 12:07 AM GMT
    What's considered a "high-risk" patient? Aren't all sexually active gay guys considered high risk? icon_confused.gif
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    May 09, 2012 12:09 AM GMT
    Larkin saidFDA favors first drug for HIV prevention

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal drug regulators on Tuesday affirmed landmark study results showing that a popular HIV-fighting pill can also help healthy people avoid contracting the virus that causes AIDS in the first place. While the pill appears safe and effective for prevention, scientists stressed that it only works when taken on a daily basis.
    [...]


    Assuming it does prevent infection (which would be great), OGK what the side effects might be. (Thinking about all those prescription medicine ads on TV and the stated effects like heart attack, thoughts of suicide, etc.)
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    May 09, 2012 12:58 AM GMT
    pocketnico said
    Ariodante saidWhy is it when I read that what I immediately envision is

    "Nah dude you don't need a condom, I'm on the pill!"


    Jajajaja! My same exact thoughts!


    This seriously cracked me up LOL
    and I love that you used a j instead of an h!
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    May 09, 2012 1:03 AM GMT
    RAWyalty said
    I love that you used a j instead of an h!


    Our first language is Spanish, we're required to or we face heavy fines.
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    May 09, 2012 1:07 AM GMT
    Ariodante saidWhy is it when I read that what I immediately envision is

    "Nah dude you don't need a condom, I'm on the pill!"


    bahaha FTW
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    May 09, 2012 1:17 AM GMT
    Ariodante saidWhy is it when I read that what I immediately envision is

    "Nah dude you don't need a condom, I'm on the pill!"


    Turnabout is fair play! Hahahahaha icon_lol.gif
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    May 09, 2012 1:18 AM GMT
    mayBbignow said
    DudeInNOVA saidWhat's considered a "high-risk" patient? Aren't all sexually active gay guys considered high risk? icon_confused.gif


    Exactly. I dont get that.



    Some guys are only into oral and/or JO. They would be defined as "low risk".
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    May 09, 2012 1:19 AM GMT
    Ariodante said
    RAWyalty said
    I love that you used a j instead of an h!


    Our first language is Spanish, we're required to or we face heavy fines.


    Spanish is mine as well. I just loved seeing it on a mostly English forum.

    I don't know if I'd believe a guy if he said he was on a pill though.
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    May 09, 2012 1:34 AM GMT
    Truvada's been used for PEP for a while now. If it works to help the body fight off initial HIV infection, then it makes sense to give it to high-risk patients. But I honestly don't think that taking Truvada will make people have more sex without condoms - I think it provides some level of protection for people who choose to engage in barebacking. It's about harm reduction and just an additional strategy in a wide range of approaches to prevent HIV from spreading.

    The danger would be to abandon condom campaigns and regular testing, which I don't see happening.
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    May 09, 2012 1:55 AM GMT
    Side effects probably aren't worth it... patient compliance is also going to be an issue if this drug is actually made available as a prophylactic.
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    May 09, 2012 1:58 AM GMT
    intensity69 said
    Ariodante saidWhy is it when I read that what I immediately envision is

    "Nah dude you don't need a condom, I'm on the pill!"


    Turnabout Turnaround is fair play! Hahahahaha icon_lol.gif
    Fixed. icon_twisted.gif
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    May 09, 2012 5:22 AM GMT
    Here are the side effects -

    The most common side effects of the medicines in TRUVADA when taken with other anti-HIV-1 medicines are diarrhea, dizziness, nausea, headache, fatigue, abnormal dreams, sleeping problems, rash, depression, and vomiting. Additional side effects are kidney problems (including decline or failure of kidney function), inflammation of the pancreas, inflammation of the liver, allergic reaction (including swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat), shortness of breath, pain, fatty liver, stomach pain, weakness, indigestion, and intestinal gas. High volume of urine and thirst, muscle pain and muscle weakness due to kidney problems have been reported. Skin discoloration (spots and freckles) may also happen with TRUVADA.

    It be interesting to see for patients that are healthy and not using an other HIV medications, if these symptoms would surface as well for healthy patients using it a a prophylactic.
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    May 09, 2012 5:28 AM GMT
    Better not have any side effects like turning straight and into a mindless religious zombie!
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    May 09, 2012 8:34 AM GMT
    uombroca saidHere are the side effects -

    The most common side effects of the medicines in TRUVADA when taken with other anti-HIV-1 medicines are diarrhea, dizziness, nausea, headache, fatigue, abnormal dreams, sleeping problems, rash, depression, and vomiting. Additional side effects are kidney problems (including decline or failure of kidney function), inflammation of the pancreas, inflammation of the liver, allergic reaction (including swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat), shortness of breath, pain, fatty liver, stomach pain, weakness, indigestion, and intestinal gas. High volume of urine and thirst, muscle pain and muscle weakness due to kidney problems have been reported. Skin discoloration (spots and freckles) may also happen with TRUVADA.

    It be interesting to see for patients that are healthy and not using an other HIV medications, if these symptoms would surface as well for healthy patients using it a a prophylactic.


    I took Truvada for a month for PEP and I didn't have any side effects. Taking the medication every day just became the most difficult part of it.
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    May 09, 2012 2:20 PM GMT
    Interesting However:

    Do we think those that can't be bothered to use a condom will be any more receptive to taking a no doubt expensive med daily for the rest of their lives as prevention?
    icon_confused.gificon_confused.gificon_confused.gificon_cry.gif
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    May 09, 2012 2:23 PM GMT
    I wonder, though, if you knew you were going to be tricking the next day if you could then start taking the medication?

    I didn't notice in the article where it said how effective the pill would be if taken, say, 24 hours prior instead of having been on it regularly.
  • kuroshiro

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    May 09, 2012 2:25 PM GMT
    What happens if you "miss" a dose? You're screwed?
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    May 09, 2012 2:31 PM GMT
    From the article:A three-year study found that daily doses cut the risk of infection in healthy gay and bisexual men by 44 percent, when accompanied by condoms and counseling.


    It cuts the risk by less than half if you use it alongside condoms. A spectacularly useless claim for the target audience.
  • jim_sf

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    May 09, 2012 2:49 PM GMT
    DudeInNOVA saidWhat's considered a "high-risk" patient? Aren't all sexually active gay guys considered high risk? icon_confused.gif


    In some respect, yes, all sexually active gay men are high-risk. I suspect the study authors are probably thinking more along the lines of "HIV-negative person in a long-term relationship with an HIV-positive person", though.
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    May 09, 2012 3:08 PM GMT
    jim_stl said
    DudeInNOVA saidWhat's considered a "high-risk" patient? Aren't all sexually active gay guys considered high risk? icon_confused.gif


    In some respect, yes, all sexually active gay men are high-risk. I suspect the study authors are probably thinking more along the lines of "HIV-negative person in a long-term relationship with an HIV-positive person", though.


    I agree, a negative partner in a sero-discordant LTR couple would be a target group. It is not a cheap drug ($11k/yr), and even though it's now approved, that doesn't mean insurance companies will cover the cost when condoms are way cheaper.
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    May 09, 2012 3:21 PM GMT
    Both people would have to be on it though. Additionally, they can still get syphochlamagonorroherpatrichohpv.