How trustworthy is the APA's DSM-5?

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    May 10, 2012 9:02 PM GMT
    The American Psychiatric Association is expecting to publish a new edition of their standard reference guide of psychopathology, the DSM-5, on May of 2013 in which medical diagnoses such as Asperger's syndrome and several classifications of schizophrenia will be eliminated. Although the APA hopes for the DSM-5 to find better grounding with the scientific advancements of the past 30 years, critics note that the revisions may not include the removal of other allegedly unnecessary classifications, such as those regarding sexual and gender identity disorders or those with low kappas (i.e. statistics on the reliability of diagnoses in treating patients).

    In light of the proposed modifications, how trustworthy do you think the APA's DSM-5 will be in psychiatric evaluations?
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    May 10, 2012 9:18 PM GMT
    Interesting question. Let me a guy I know who studied Psychological Manipulation and tell you what he wants to think.icon_smile.gif
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    May 10, 2012 9:50 PM GMT
    A good critical analysis about the new DSM-5 :
    http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/streams-of-consciousness/2012/05/07/psychiatrists-are-about-to-shift-the-boundaries-between-sane-and-insane/
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    May 11, 2012 1:26 AM GMT
    I know people who have contributed to the DSM-V. It's not something that is taken lightly. They do a lot of surveys and analyse a lot of data before suggestions are put forward. And diagnoses aren't (well, shouldn't) be something that is taken lightly. A psychiatrist doesn't just tick off a list of criteria and say "well, you have 4 ou5 of 5, that makes you bipolar!). It's not that simple.

    I note in the OP's post the line "allegedly unnecessary classifications". This is something I teach in some of my classes, the tension between having a classification/diagnosis that could cause stigma versus having a classification/diagnosis so a person can access the help/treatment they need, as well as benefits that may come from that (e.g. subsidised medications, therapy, etc). Some classifications have been put into the DSM in recognition that there are variations in the nature and severity of the mood experiences - e.g. bipolar I, bipolar II, and cyclothymia.
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    May 12, 2012 5:24 AM GMT
    As much as I know it's pretty reliable and widely well regarded by psychologists. My psy teacher has a DSM-IV and she worships it. But the problem is to an extent, nothing is 100% accurate, DSM is not an exception. DSM is based on case studies which scientists have done for decades, but of course it is only what most people "AGREE ON." Who knows in the future we might find out something else. Furthermore, psychologists can use DMS as a "reference only" to diagnose psychological disorders since each case is unique.