Is BASMATI brown rice more nutritious than regular brown rice?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 11, 2012 3:11 AM GMT
    This question is asked a lot on the internet but I can't find a straight answer to it.

    I'm talking about the "pure" kind from India, not the hybrid white basmati/brown rice version grown in California.

    I did learn that wild rice is more nutritious than either, but maybe that's a generalization.

    I prefer the flavor and texture of brown basmati rice to regular brown rice.

    Obviously, as most of us know, regular brown rice is more nutritious than regular white rice.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 11, 2012 8:01 AM GMT
    there is slight variation between white and brown rice in general, its nothing like brown and white bread.

    but like MMM said, depends on who you ask. In my case, coming from an Indian background as well those from other rice-eating asian backgrounds.. we tend process rice really well. So that may be a factor for me as well.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 11, 2012 1:56 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidThis goes back to a thread I created regarding phytic acid. Some people argue that white basmati rice is more nutritious because the hulls in brown rice (containing the phytic acid) are removed during the bleaching process.

    So this means presoaking the BROWN BATSAMI rice to "neutralize" the phytic acid will make it more nutritious than WHITE BATSAMI rice and at least as nutritious as PRESOAKED REGULAR BROWN rice? (Caps used to avoid confusion.)


    FootballHawk saidthere is slight variation between white and brown rice in general, its nothing like brown and white bread.

    Even if there's not much difference between white and brown rice, rice is a staple for me and I tend to cook and freeze meals in bulk (20-50 at a time using either brown rice or quinoa) so I'd like to make the smartest choice.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 11, 2012 3:23 PM GMT
    eagermuscle said
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidThis goes back to a thread I created regarding phytic acid. Some people argue that white basmati rice is more nutritious because the hulls in brown rice (containing the phytic acid) are removed during the bleaching process.

    So this means presoaking the BROWN BATSAMI rice to "neutralize" the phytic acid will make it more nutritious than WHITE BATSAMI rice and at least as nutritious as PRESOAKED REGULAR BROWN rice? (Caps used to avoid confusion.)


    FootballHawk saidthere is slight variation between white and brown rice in general, its nothing like brown and white bread.

    Even if there's not much difference between white and brown rice, rice is a staple for me and I tend to cook and freeze meals in bulk (20-50 at a time using either brown rice or quinoa) so I'd like to make the smartest choice.


    I would be incline NOT to freeze cooked Basmati rice. It's too thin and the freezing/recooking would effect its' texture and make it relatively mushy. A pity to lose that.
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19119

    May 11, 2012 3:26 PM GMT
    How does Jasmine white rice figure into all of this -- cuz I get it from Trader Joe's and I LOVE it!!
  • jim_sf

    Posts: 2094

    May 11, 2012 3:50 PM GMT
    The main difference between brown and white rice, whether we're talking basmati or another strain, is in processing. White rice has had the bran (the outer layer of the seed) removed; brown rice either keeps it intact or only has a portion removed. There are a lot of nutrients in the bran, including fiber, iron, magnesium, and B-complex vitamins, which are removed in milling.

    As for phytic acid: it does chelate iron, among other things, but the ratio of phytic acid to iron in rice bran is such that brown rice is still an excellent source of iron. In any case, brown rice has relatively low levels of phytic acid, especially when compared to many other seed foods.
  • jim_sf

    Posts: 2094

    May 11, 2012 3:52 PM GMT
    BuddyinNYC saidI would be incline NOT to freeze cooked Basmati rice. It's too thin and the freezing/recooking would effect its' texture and make it relatively mushy. A pity to lose that.


    Brown basmati is a bit more rugged than white basmati, but you're right, it will lose some of its texture during recooking.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 11, 2012 6:21 PM GMT
    Brown basmati rice is comparable to other types of brown rice in nutrient content (although it does contain about 20% more fiber compared to most other types of brown rice), and white basmati rice is comparable to other types of white rice.

    http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=dailytip&dbid=365
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 11, 2012 6:21 PM GMT
    Now-way
    i eat it everyday
    its just more glutenous & carb
    it has long strands
    brown rice has bran on it which is rich in B-complex vitamins

    white rice is processed & loses every nutrient!
  • RSnSD

    Posts: 98

    May 11, 2012 6:28 PM GMT
    Studies definitely suggest any type of brown rice is better than white (as others have already mentioned due to the processing involved), and in fact, white rice can possibly increase your risk for diabetes if consumed regularly.

    http://vitals.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2012/03/16/10721069-white-rice-may-increase-your-risk-of-diabetes?lite
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 11, 2012 6:31 PM GMT
    Thanks everyone for the other useful information but so far no one has given a straight (or even gay) answer, or provided a link to an answer, to the specific question of whether basmati brown rice is more nutritious than regular brown rice.

    (Assume that both would be presoaked so that phytic acid wouldn't be an issue.)
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 11, 2012 6:37 PM GMT
    no it is not, it does provide more fiber tho (see link in my previous post).
  • jim_sf

    Posts: 2094

    May 11, 2012 6:51 PM GMT
    eagermuscle saidThanks everyone for the other useful information but so far no one has given a straight (or even gay) answer, or provided a link to an answer, to the specific question of whether basmati brown rice is more nutritious than regular brown rice.

    (Assume that both would be presoaked so that phytic acid wouldn't be an issue.)


    I can't find any indication that basmati is notably more nutritious than other varieties of rice. If you prefer the flavor and texture, though, then that's a pretty good reason to stick to basmati.
  • FredMG

    Posts: 988

    May 11, 2012 7:01 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidI would suggest getting a rice cooker which allows for easy and safe cooking.

    When using a rice cooker you can set it and walk away and come back hours later and your rice is not burned, but cooked just perfectly.

    If I'm going to eat rice I don't want to freeze after cooking it. I like it as fresh as possible.

    +1

    I also understand that freezing will also break down the "fiber" in vegetables and grains - so I try and eat everything fresh. Not that I've given up on the little bags of frozen veggies for "emergencies" when I just want to toss a bag into soup or a stir fry and "be done with it"
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 11, 2012 9:18 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    A good rice cooker brand is: Zojirushi


    I agree.

    I have this one:

    5.2.jpg

    Mine hides in a cabinet when it's not in use (which is most nights). I must not be quite as gay as you are.icon_cry.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 11, 2012 9:22 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    I used to have a larger white one but gave it to my mother.


    This is upsetting to me for some reason.
  • metta

    Posts: 39099

    May 11, 2012 10:47 PM GMT
    I have had my Zojirushi for 10 years and have never had a problem with it. icon_smile.gif
  • metta

    Posts: 39099

    May 11, 2012 10:50 PM GMT
    I think that if there was a huge difference between the two basmatis, that there would most likely be information on that.

    http://www.tilda.com/our-rice/nutrition-facts


    Food Item: Brown Basmati Rice
    Food Quantity: 1 ounce, dry
    Carbs: 18g
    Dietary Fiber: 1.5g
    Net Carbs: 16.5g

    http://www.carbs-information.com/carbohydrate-rice/basmati-rice-brown.htm



    Carbs and Fiber in White Basmati Rice

    Food Item: White Basmati Rice
    Food Quantity: 1 oz, dry
    Carbs: 19g
    Dietary Fiber: 1g
    Net Carbs: 18g

    White Basmati Rice and Carbs
    http://www.carbs-information.com/carbohydrate-rice/basmati-rice-white.htm



    BROWN BASMATI RICE NUTRITION INFORMATION

    "Brown basmati, being less processed than white rice, retains its whole-grain nutritional value. Basmati has the highest content of all rice for amino acids and essential nutrients."

    http://www.livestrong.com/article/252914-brown-basmati-rice-nutrition-information/
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 11, 2012 10:54 PM GMT
    CuriousJockAZ saidHow does Jasmine white rice figure into all of this -- cuz I get it from Trader Joe's and I LOVE it!!


    I buy the Brown Jasmine Rice from Trader Joe's as well and love it - Not sure if you have tried iticon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 12, 2012 12:47 AM GMT
    You can make yourself nuts with these kinds of things.

    When you see nutritional analyses, keep in mind that you're looking at an average and that a significant range of factors can also play a role in the actual nutritional content of the food you eat at a particular time. Field and climate conditions, soil content, storage parameters, the interaction of other ingredients in a meal...

    So instead of trying to parse unknowable specifics, concentrate on broader issues, like are you getting your nutrition from a variety of sources, are you eating lots of fresh ingredients?

    Food isn't magic; everything we eat has something in it is not good for us. Don't depend on any single ingredient and you'll be better off.
  • metatextual

    Posts: 774

    May 12, 2012 1:07 AM GMT
    i usually eat red or black thai rice; which, seems to have more fibre and protein than white, at least.
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    May 12, 2012 1:26 AM GMT
    Eager, I think notadumbjock gave you an answer. It looks like the value is in somewhat higher fiber and a slightly lower carb count, as per the other reply giving numbers.

    I also like bulghur. Have you compared that?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 12, 2012 6:14 PM GMT
    notadumbjock saidBrown basmati rice is comparable to other types of brown rice in nutrient content (although it does contain about 20% more fiber compared to most other types of brown rice), and white basmati rice is comparable to other types of white rice.

    http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=dailytip&dbid=365

    Thanks for clarifying the answer to my question.

    An explanation as to why I kept missing it - I normally don't post questions I can easily find by googling. For example, before asking about rice cookers I googled them and already knew about the Zojirushi brand. But I was so tired when I googled "What's the difference between brown batsami rice and brown rice?" and immediately came upon the same article from whfoods.org that I missed that part, and didn't catch it until your future edit to your initial post when you requoted it.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 13, 2012 4:04 AM GMT
    That's the point, I didn't even know brown basmati existed until it came as a side dish at a local Pakistani deli. It was so delicious I immediately considered it a brown rice alternative - just wanted to know if it was nutritionally equivalent, and it not only is, but it's better given more fiber! I substitute bulger and quinoa for brown rice but nothing was quite so tasty as the basmati.

    Given the savings and extreme convenience I'll still bulk cook and freeze my rice (after all, frozen dinners come with rice) but I'll prepare it fresh more often, with or without a rice cooker.


  • waccamatt

    Posts: 1918

    May 13, 2012 4:06 AM GMT
    Brown rice is nutritionally better than white rice, but I use quinoa in place of rice and it is nutritionally better than brown rice and works very similarly in recipes. I have grown to adore quinoa. I ought to marry it. icon_smile.gif