A Secular View on Wisdom, Virtue and Truth. Quotes from "The Good Book: A Humanist Bible." Compiled by A.G. Grayling

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    May 21, 2012 6:52 PM GMT
    I recently found a book at my local B&N which intrigued me. It is filled with passages and quotes from our greatest philosophers throughout history.

    It is arranged thematically, but, unfortunately, leaves the quotes unattributed.

    I thought I'd share some good quotes, as I come across them.

    For whatever they are worth...

    (I just hope I'm not infringing on copyright law. icon_eek.gificon_redface.gificon_eek.gif )

    Feel free to add any quotes you like, guys!
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    May 21, 2012 7:00 PM GMT
    I doubt it, as they are already copies from other philosophers. Very likely those original ancient copyrights have run out. icon_wink.gif

    So, you post, and I'll give my opinions, and maybe some others will, too.
  • GWriter

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    May 21, 2012 7:00 PM GMT
    Is this line from Cicero in the book?
    Esse quam videri. (Be, rather than seem.)
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    May 21, 2012 7:03 PM GMT
    GWriter saidIs this line from Cicero in the book?
    Esse quam videri. (Be, rather than seem.)


    I just googled the book, and Cicero is in there, so maybe. Our host will tell us.

    Nice quote. I agree.
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    May 21, 2012 7:06 PM GMT
    GWriter saidIs this line from Cicero in the book?
    Esse quam videri. (Be, rather than seem.)


    This book is somewhat annoying because the passages are unattributed. They're written similar in style to the wisdom books in the Bible, and in a stream of consciousness format. One phrase could be Confucius, the next Nietzsche, followed by Aristotle...but only recognize it if you're familiar with their sayings. icon_confused.gif

    The author would have helped if he put the philosophers name in parentheses.

    Anyhoo...let me get back to reading. icon_biggrin.gif
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    May 21, 2012 7:08 PM GMT
    Well, post ones that appeal and we can try pop them into google to find out who they originated with.

    I have to go offline for a bit but will be back.

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    May 21, 2012 7:12 PM GMT
    There are three kinds of enjoyment which are advantageous. These are discriminating studies, speaking of the goodness of others, and possessing worthy friends.
    There are three kinds of enjoyment which are injurious. These are extravagant pleasures, idleness and sauntering about and feasting.
  • GWriter

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    May 21, 2012 7:16 PM GMT
    n8698u saidThere are three kinds of enjoyment which are advantageous. These are discriminating studies, speaking of the goodness of others, and possessing worthy friends.
    There are three kinds of enjoyment which are injurious. These are extravagant pleasures, idleness and sauntering about and feasting.

    Speaking of Aristotle, that sounds a little like him.
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    May 21, 2012 7:16 PM GMT

    "There are three kinds of enjoyment which are injurious. These are extravagant pleasures, idleness and sauntering about and feasting."

    Well, whoever wrote that about sauntering about should be over here at my place right now. Every 15 minutes I have to get up and saunter about considerably as I've injured my back and was told I have to keep moving to avoid stiffness (no not THERE, lol)

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    May 21, 2012 7:16 PM GMT
    There are three things which the superior man stands in awe. He stands in awe of the command of reason. He stands in awe of great men. He stands in awe of the wisdom of sages.
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    May 21, 2012 7:18 PM GMT
    Got it! Confucius!
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    May 21, 2012 7:34 PM GMT
    The feeling of commiseration is the principle of benevolence.
    The feeling of shame and dislike is the principle of righteousness.
    The feeling of modesty and complaisance is the principle of propriety.
    The feeling of approving and disapproving is the principle of knowledge.

    Men have these principles just as they have four limbs.
    When men willfully do not live by these principles, they play the theif with themselves; they steal away their better nature.
    Since all men have these four principles in themselves, let them give full development and completion to them, and the result will be like a fire which has begun to burn, or a spring which has begun to flow.
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    May 21, 2012 7:49 PM GMT
    The master said, "If a man loves others but no affection is shown to him in return, left him turn inwards and examine his own benevolence.
    If he is charged with governing others, and his rule is unsuccessful, let him turn inwards and examine his wisdom.
    If he treats others politely, and they do not return his politeness, let him turn inwards and examine his own feeling of respect."

    "When we do not, by what we do, realize what we desire, we must turn inward and examine ourselves in every point.
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    May 21, 2012 8:06 PM GMT
    The master was asked what constitutes perfect virtue.
    He said, "Generosity, sincerity, earnestness and kindness: These together constitute perfect virtue."
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    May 21, 2012 8:14 PM GMT
    "A book's effectiveness on the reader is measured by how many bookstores and countries have it banned."
  • GWriter

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    May 21, 2012 8:15 PM GMT
    n8698u saidThe master was asked what constitutes perfect virtue.
    He said, "Generosity, sincerity, earnestness and kindness: These together constitute perfect virtue."

    Don't care much for this one. Earnestness? Pass. Where are wisdom, moderation, prudence, and courage?
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    May 21, 2012 8:34 PM GMT
    GWriter said
    n8698u saidThe master was asked what constitutes perfect virtue.
    He said, "Generosity, sincerity, earnestness and kindness: These together constitute perfect virtue."

    Don't care much for this one. Earnestness? Pass. Where are wisdom, moderation, prudence, and courage?


    As I'm looking back through this "Sages" chapter, it seems the majority of quotes are Confucian in feeling. I'm guessing the earnestness might come close to hard work, and kindness might be filial piety in the Confucian model. Much of the unquoted part of the chapter does mention all your choices too.

    I wish I could quotes the whole chapter, it's so good, but then the copyright lawyers would have my *ahems* for ear baubles. icon_neutral.gif
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    May 21, 2012 8:38 PM GMT
    It seems the way this is written, Mr Garyling may be paraphrasing, synthesizing and patching ideas together. They may not be direct quotes, but a mish-mash.
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    May 22, 2012 12:43 AM GMT
    I found my old copy of The Analects of Confucius, and the majority of quotes from that chapter do belong to him.
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    May 22, 2012 12:45 AM GMT
    n8698u saidThe master said, "If a man loves others but no affection is shown to him in return, left him turn inwards and examine his own benevolence.
    If he is charged with governing others, and his rule is unsuccessful, let him turn inwards and examine his wisdom.
    If he treats others politely, and they do not return his politeness, let him turn inwards and examine his own feeling of respect."

    "When we do not, by what we do, realize what we desire, we must turn inward and examine ourselves in every point.



    Well, the first line is from Mencious (Mang tsu)

    http://www.humanistictexts.org/mencius.htm
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    May 22, 2012 1:51 AM GMT
    I'm jumping chapters to "Proverbs."

    Adversity:
    Adversity is the first path to truth.
    Gold is tested by fire, brave men by adversity.

    Advice:
    Who will not be advised cannot be helped.
    Advice after mischief is like medicine after death.
    In advising a friend, seek to help, not please.

    Ambition:
    Ambition obeys no law but its own.
    Low ambition and thirst for praise: marks of the worthless.
  • GWriter

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    May 22, 2012 1:56 AM GMT
    I'm getting the impression that this book is really the Mish-Mashy, Unoriginal but also Uncredited Analects of A.G. Grayling.
    You seem to be enjoying it, but I think it would drive me crazy.
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    May 22, 2012 2:03 AM GMT
    GWriter saidI'm getting the impression that this book is really the Mish-Mashy, Unoriginal but also Uncredited Analects of A.G. Grayling.
    You seem to be enjoying it, but I think it would drive me crazy.


    It is kind of like flipping through "Bartlett's Familiar Quotations"...without the names. icon_confused.gif

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    May 22, 2012 2:34 AM GMT
    n8698u saidI'm jumping chapters to "Proverbs."

    Adversity:
    Adversity is the first path to truth.
    Gold is tested by fire, brave men by adversity.



    Hmmm...this one is like Seneca's, " Fire is the test of gold; adversity, of strong men. "

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    May 22, 2012 2:58 AM GMT
    JPtheBITCH saidSo the Greek guy goes to his tailor and hands him a pair of trousers.
    The tailor holds them up and looks at the customer.
    Tailor: Euripides?
    Customer: Eumenides!



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