Raising the ban on don't ask, don't tell

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    Jul 23, 2008 11:31 PM GMT
    Has anyone else heard word of this?
  • roadbikeRob

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    Jul 23, 2008 11:39 PM GMT
    I have heard nothing recently on abolishing the don't ask don't tell policy in the military. I guess it is business as usual.
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    Jul 23, 2008 11:44 PM GMT
    I barely heard something about it on the news. Something about the studies done back in the 90's, below 50% said that it should be don't ask/don't tell. But they recently did another study and above 50% say that it should be raised. Something like that at least. I don't know the number, I just know it was below/above 50%.
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    Jul 23, 2008 11:56 PM GMT
    Here is a link on it:

    http://seaqwa.com/blogs/qnews/archive/2008/07/22/hearing-on-don-t-ask-don-t-tell-launches-push-to-repeal-policy.aspx
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    Jul 24, 2008 12:15 AM GMT
    Im with obama that it should be lifted. That policy had cause more problems for gays in the military rather then helped.

    Kinda surprise that it wasnt the other way around you would think McCain not wanting to support gays would want it repealed and Obama stay the policy.
  • ROYCE13

    Posts: 315

    Jul 24, 2008 12:20 AM GMT
    It is all TALK right now.
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    Jul 24, 2008 12:31 AM GMT
    I wouldnt serve in the damn military. Fuck 'em! What? You dont want me? No problemo! Who wants to serve with these dickhead generals? They cant plan a war against a third rate power and win! The fuckers are only interest in their promotions and pensions. I wouldnt put my life on the line with those dickheads running the show. Man, I would washing my underwear in with my red shirts real fast!!! .. icon_evil.gif

    Oh see this thread I just posted from the news:

    http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/239044/
  • dcarm

    Posts: 291

    Jul 24, 2008 12:36 AM GMT
    Re Obama and McCain

    It all depends on which way they'd be repealing it. I'm guessing Obama would be repealing DADT in the positive "gays can serve openly in the militry" way. while McCain would want to either keep it as is or go back to "None of you ho-mo-se-xuals can join."
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    Jul 24, 2008 1:15 AM GMT
    It's not all talk. Go to www.sldn.org for the trends and the statistics. We're at 75% of the US now favors gays serving openly, and that includes over 60% of Republicans! The "old guard" is fading away. More Generals, Admirals, and other leaders, both gay and straight are saying it's become a nonissue and runs counter to the military's strategic focus. Even Sam Nunn, one of the chief architects of DADT, has suggested it be reviewed--stopping short of calling for its repeal.

    There are hearings going on tomorrow (Wednesday, July 24). Here's a clip from tonight's Nightly News:
    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21134540/vp/25819938#25819938
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    Jul 24, 2008 2:33 AM GMT
    That would be pretty cool news.
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    Jul 24, 2008 2:55 AM GMT
    dcarm saidRe Obama and McCain

    It all depends on which way they'd be repealing it. I'm guessing Obama would be repealing DADT in the positive "gays can serve openly in the militry" way. while McCain would want to either keep it as is or go back to "None of you ho-mo-se-xuals can join."


    Obama cant repeal it. It is law. The result of Clinton trying to repay gays first thing in his administration, what was only a military policy (No gays) became a law. As commander-in-chief he could have repealed the policy but he cant repeal a law.
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    Jul 24, 2008 3:02 AM GMT
    Yea, but if enough people are for it, don't they have to? If it's going to be on the polls to repeal it, wouldn't it be repealed?
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    Jul 24, 2008 3:09 AM GMT
    Caslon's saying that it's in Congress' hands to change, not the President's. To that point, there are a tremendous amount of current sponsors and supporters backing the Military Readiness Enhancement Act:

    http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/bdquery/z?d110:HR01246:@@@P
    (sorry, the URL function is not working for me)

    Is your House rep on the list? If not, LOBBY!
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    Jul 24, 2008 3:24 AM GMT
    Sure it can be repealed by Congress. And the members of Congress will do anything if they think voters are behind it.

    I think people see the DADT policy as eliminating skilled people when they are necessary to keeping the country safe. I am not overly impressed by this change of heart. The people of this country are looking out for their own asses. Now that their asses are on the line they are all for gays in the military.

    It's kinda like in the 60s. Black civil rights didnt really get going until they burned some cities. Once people saw themselves and their property as threatened they were right there to recognize Black civil rights.
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    Jul 24, 2008 3:30 AM GMT
    Yea, I get your point now... too true.
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    Jul 24, 2008 1:43 PM GMT
    Congress had a session to discuss the subject, that's all that's going on right now.

    In his last few months in office, I think President Bush will lift DADT and the ban by executive order. It's just a hunch. He doesn't have to play to the base so much anymore and he is more LGBT friendly than you know.

    I am disappointed in the most vocal elements of the LGBT community for not being supportive of President Bush and the war on terror. I doubt if the country can rely on recruits from that sector anyway. They just give the christian taliban more ammunition to oppress LGBT patriots.


    Caslon, you bring up the race riots of the 60s, I'm glad you did, nothing illustrates the differences between Republicans and Democrats better. We Republicans aren't so vocal, we don't throw temper tantrums and carry signs on "marches", or take part in "civil disobedience", better known as riots. We just voice our opinions in acceptable forums and vote.
    Unfortunately the government wasted a ton of money on "non-lethal" riot suppression gear, 00 buckshot would work much better. Open rebellion deserves a lethal response.








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    Jul 24, 2008 3:58 PM GMT
    John43620 saidCongress had a session to discuss the subject, that's all that's going on right now.

    In his last few months in office, I think President Bush will lift DADT and the ban by executive order. It's just a hunch. He doesn't have to play to the base so much anymore and he is more LGBT friendly than you know.

    I am disappointed in the most vocal elements of the LGBT community for not being supportive of President Bush and the war on terror. I doubt if the country can rely on recruits from that sector anyway. They just give the christian taliban more ammunition to oppress LGBT patriots.


    Caslon, you bring up the race riots of the 60s, I'm glad you did, nothing illustrates the differences between Republicans and Democrats better. We Republicans aren't so vocal, we don't throw temper tantrums and carry signs on "marches", or take part in "civil disobedience", better known as riots. We just voice our opinions in acceptable forums and vote.
    Unfortunately the government wasted a ton of money on "non-lethal" riot suppression gear, 00 buckshot would work much better. Open rebellion deserves a lethal response.

    I dont consider the race riots as unacceptable. If the majority insists on suppressing a minority, the minority has no other recourse than to fight back. And it is an entirely acceptable recourse. Our whole revolution was a violent response to unacceptable treatment.
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    Jul 24, 2008 6:01 PM GMT
    Here's an awesome exchange in Congress today about the topic. The woman is obnoxious, and she gets hit with a great question from the Representative.

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    Jul 25, 2008 1:53 AM GMT
    I like that guy. I hear he's being challenged by a Republican father of a son killed in Iraq by a sniper.
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    Jul 25, 2008 1:56 AM GMT
    1969er saidI like that guy. I hear he's being challenged by a Republican father of a son killed in Iraq by a sniper.


    So is that what politics here has come down to? Some kind of "my military story trumps yours"? What a f*cked up country we live in now. Sheesh.
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    Jul 25, 2008 2:01 AM GMT
    mickeytopogigio saidHere's an awesome exchange in Congress today about the topic. The woman is obnoxious, and she gets hit with a great question from the Representative.




    We need more people like him!
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    Jul 25, 2008 2:17 AM GMT
    mickeytopogigio said The woman is obnoxious, and she gets hit with a great question from the Representative.


    The Washington Post had a great article that summarized the damage that woman did to her own cause. I can't believe the Republicans agreed to allow her to testify.

    This is my favorite part of the article...
    The Washington Post saidRep. Vic Snyder (D-Ark.) labeled her statement "just bonkers" and "dumb," and he called her claims about an HIV menace "inappropriate." Said Snyder: "By this analysis . . . we ought to recruit only lesbians for the military, because they have the lowest incidence of HIV in the country."


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    Jul 25, 2008 2:46 AM GMT
    i for one would be happy if they repeal ir cause its not something i really i want to hide, when i go in
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    Jul 25, 2008 3:07 AM GMT
    I would like to see an LGBT Division, or at least an LGBT Brigade in the Army.

    During the American Civil War black troops were able to form Brigades. The American Civil War was very unpopular, even in the north. It had many similarities to the present day situation with the war in Iraq and the response here at home.

    This idea would be counter to President Truman's desegregation policy.

    It would however be an opportunity and a wake-up call to the entire LGBT community. Would enough of us serve?





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    Aug 14, 2008 8:24 PM GMT
    Big movement here, in the DNC adding the repeal of DADT to its platform. From the Servicemember's Legal Defense Network:

    This is a bold and historic moment for lesbian, gay and bisexual members of the military.

    On Saturday, the Democratic Platform Committee listened to SLDN, and our allies, and approved a platform that calls for repealing "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" and replacing it with a non-discrimination policy.

    Coming after last month's successful Congressional hearing on "Don't Ask, Don't Tell," and a national poll showing that 75 percent of Americans want to overturn the failed policy, it's clear that our movement is gaining momentum every day.

    We need your help to keep this momentum going. Please ask three of your friends or family members to join SLDN's movement to repeal "Don't Ask, Don't Tell":

    http://action.sldn.org/GrowTheMovement

    The strong policy position drafted by the Democratic platform committee is an important step in the right direction.

    The language of the Democratic platform declares:

    "We will also put national security above divisive politics... At a time when the military is having a tough time recruiting and retaining troops, it is wrong to deny our country the service of brave, qualified people. We support the repeal of "Don't Ask Don't Tell" and the implementation of policies to allow qualified men and women to serve openly regardless of sexual orientation."


    We still have a lot of work to do in the weeks ahead. The Republican Party hasn't taken a position on "Don't Ask, Don't Tell," and we must keep the pressure up to make sure the Republicans adopt a similar position to the Democratic platform.

    And we have even more work to do in the months ahead to ensure our leaders in Washington do more than just take a position against "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" - but also change the law.

    Help SLDN continue its momentum by inviting three friends to our cause:

    http://action.sldn.org/GrowTheMovement

    We're getting closer every day to allowing lesbians, gays and bisexuals to openly serve our country. Thank you for your continued support.

    Sincerely,

    Aubrey Sarvis
    Executive Director
    Servicemembers Legal Defense Network



    PS: Please read my latest Huffington Post column on the Democratic platform - and forward it to your friends:

    http://action.sldn.org/huffpo