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Wheat Belly!

  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE May 24, 2012 5:00 AM GMT
    Wheat! "Wholesome goodness", I've been told since I was a child.

    Could this staple of our diet actually be killing us?

    I just shared a full day on the way to Yosemite, at the park, and on the ride back with a colleague discussing the mutagenisis which has been introduced into our food supply by food companies such as Monsanto.

    When did Monsanto get into the food business? When I was a kid, they were known for making synthetic carpet fibers.

    Your Addiction to Wheat Products Is Making You Fat and Unhealthy

    The more I'm reading about the wheat we eat today, the less enthused I am about eating it.

    What do you think about "Wheat Belly"?
  • MuchMoreThanM... Posts: 21242
    QUOTE May 24, 2012 5:33 AM GMT
    I eat wholewheat pasta and have discovered wheat gluten as a source of vegetable protein.

    I can't say that it makes me fat.

    I watch my calorie intake and eat a structured diet. I'm doing fine thus far.
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE May 24, 2012 6:50 AM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidI eat wholewheat pasta and have discovered wheat gluten as a source of vegetable protein.

    I can't say that it makes me fat.

    I watch my calorie intake and eat a structured diet. I'm doing fine thus far.


    ah 3 times the man.

    I always had a belly even as a kid I was skinny as, but always had a belly. Recently I went gluten free and the belly is gone.
    Plus I also noticed my sinus cleared.
    I told my family this over Xmas and forgot one is a wheat farmer, he didnt like the idea of a wheat free society, however in his defence he has started growing other grains.
  • MuchMoreThanM... Posts: 21242
    QUOTE May 24, 2012 8:18 AM GMT
    northoz said

    ah 3 times the man.



    Ooops, sorry about that.

    Fixed!
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE May 24, 2012 9:47 AM GMT
    Monsanto employees voted to ban Monsanto's GMO from their cafeteria...

    In what has to be close to the ultimate in corporate hypocrisy, employees at a Monsanto company cafeteria have won the right to have their employee cafeteria serve non-GMO food:

    GM foods not served in Monsanto cafeteria

    http://gizadeathstar.com/2012/02/monsanto-cafeteria-bans-gmo-foods/

    MOnsanto has also developed a breed of corn that is resistant to agent orange...shade of Vietnam. This allows farms to spread the corn with agent orange to kill weeds....then serve the corn to you. Bon appetit!
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE May 24, 2012 10:39 AM GMT
    GAMRican saidWheat! "Wholesome goodness", I've been told since I was a child.

    Could this staple of our diet actually be killing us?

    I just shared a full day on the way to Yosemite, at the park, and on the ride back with a colleague discussing the mutagenisis which has been introduced into our food supply by food companies such as Monsanto.

    When did Monsanto get into the food business? When I was a kid, they were known for making synthetic carpet fibers.

    Your Addiction to Wheat Products Is Making You Fat and Unhealthy

    The more I'm reading about the wheat we eat today, the less enthused I am about eating it.

    What do you think about "Wheat Belly"?



    I know more than one person diagnosed with fibromyalgia who found out that their pain/difficulty was caused by wheat products.
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE May 24, 2012 11:29 AM GMT
    Wheat is a general evil
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE May 24, 2012 11:37 AM GMT
    I did Wheat Belly diet in February except I didn't give up beans. I also increased my exercise intensity and I lost 20 pounds in the month. Then came the Irish High Holy Month and many celebrations along with my Soda Bread. Didn't lose a pound. I never intended to give up all wheat. I love pasta. As with all diets, there are good things and bad things. Most important is to eat small portions frequently and everything in moderation.
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE May 24, 2012 11:45 AM GMT
    GonzoTheGreat saidWheat is a general evil


    Your looking great GTG so is elimination of wheat your secret?
  • MuchMoreThanM... Posts: 21242
    QUOTE May 24, 2012 11:54 AM GMT
    The thing about bread or pasta is that people tend to overeat it and underestimate the caloric density of these foods.

    One serving is two ounces or fifty-six grams. I use a scale to measure my pasta so that I don't overdo it.

    In a study I read awhile ago, people were asked to determine what a serving size of pasta was. They were given a box of the product and were asked to partition one serving size. The results of that study confirmed that what most people that was only one serving were, in fact, two to three or more servings of pasta.

  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE May 24, 2012 12:06 PM GMT
    I gave up gluten long time, long time. It's great if you're an athlete - not a person who does 30 minutes on a treadmill then lifts weights.
    I'm talking triathletes, swimmers, distance runners, cyclists, etc. Endurance training causes your muscles to become inflamed, that's just the nature of it. But if you're eating gluten in your diet that is also causing more inflammation throughout your entire system. SO, natural training inflammation plus diet-inflicted inflammation and you're slowing your times while increasing your recovery time. I'm not a doctor but I do read. Do your own research, gluten (like dairy) has no benefits in our biology. It's just not an ingredient that was present throughout human evolution.
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE May 24, 2012 1:48 PM GMT
    Regarding what avoiding wheat means to the body...
    From a post on the Wheat Belly blog:1) You avoid the gliadin protein of wheat, the opiate in wheat that stimulates appetite and increases calorie consumption by 440 calories per day. (Eliminate gliadin and calorie consumption drops by 440 calories per day.)
    2) You avoid the lectin in wheat, wheat germ agglutinin, that is directly toxic to the intestinal tract and causes abnormal intestinal permeability that Trojan horse’s foreign substances into the bloodstream, causing multiple inflammatory diseases. You may also restore leptin sensitivity to restore the capacity for weight loss.
    3) You avoid the amylopectin A of wheat, the “complex carbohydrate” that accounts for the fact that two slices of whole grain bread increases blood sugar higher than 6 teaspoons of table sugar.
    4) You avoid the alpha amylase inhibitors that trigger wheat allergy, likely the trigger for the boom in wheat allergy among kids.

    There’s more, but you get the idea. Wheat is a perfectly crafted poison to humans. Wheat is such an effective destroyer of human health that you’d think that, if terrorists wanted to bring America down, they wouldn’t bomb buildings. They would just feed us turkey sandwiches on multigrain bread.


    I've never really had problems with wheat. I don't seem to have any of the symptoms above. Due to my family history of Type II Diabetes, I tend to avoid high-glycemic carbohydrates in general. However, as of yesterday...I had no wheat (that I know of). Unless wheat "comes my way" and is an unavoidable choice, I think I'll eat other things today.

    I'm not craving or jonesing for wheat at all. Yet?

    If you're a wheat-free kind of guy, what are some of your experiences, tips, tricks, traps, during the period which you eliminated wheat from your diet?
  • MuchMoreThanM... Posts: 21242
    QUOTE May 24, 2012 2:07 PM GMT
    To my understanding determining true allergies to wheat products requires an allegy blood test.

    Plant based foods have lectin. All fruits and vegetables have lectins. Granted, some have more or less than others. Beans are very high in lectin. But in my many cases the lectin is significantly reduced by cooking and processing. I learned that canned beans tend to have lower levels of lectin than home prepared beans because commercially prepared beans tend to be cooked longer. The longer cooking process supposedly reduces lectin levels. So I tend to cook my beans twice as long at home with the hopes that I am achieving the same effect.

    I don't want to eat out of cans because of the BPA concerns that I'm still not comfortable with.

    The guys that are asserting that wheat products are bad are only doing so because of how it makes their body look.

    I tend to be able to have my best strength training workouts while carbed up on wholewheat pasta. I tend to be the strongest too. My my training style is explosive and fewer reps. I

    I can't comment on the physiology regarding my innards at this time. I don't feel achy or stiff when eating gluten.
  • MuchMoreThanM... Posts: 21242
    QUOTE May 24, 2012 2:07 PM GMT
    To my understanding determining true allergies to wheat products requires an allegy blood test.

    Plant based foods have lectin. All fruits and vegetables have lectins. Granted, some have more or less than others. Beans are very high in lectin. But in my many cases the lectin is significantly reduced by cooking and processing. I learned that canned beans tend to have lower levels of lectin than home prepared beans because commercially prepared beans tend to be cooked longer. The longer cooking process supposedly reduces lectin levels. So I tend to cook my beans twice as long at home with the hopes that I am achieving the same effect.

    I don't want to eat out of cans because of the BPA concerns that I'm still not comfortable with.

    The guys that are asserting that wheat products are bad are only doing so because of how it makes their body look.

    I tend to be able to have my best strength training workouts while carbed up on wholewheat pasta. I tend to be the strongest too. My my training style is explosive and fewer reps.

    I can't comment on the physiology regarding my innards at this time. I don't feel achy or stiff when eating gluten.
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE May 24, 2012 2:37 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidTo my understanding determining true allergies to wheat products requires an allegy blood test.

    Plant based foods have lectin. All fruits and vegetables have lectins. Granted, some have more or less than others. Beans are very high in lectin. But in my many cases the lectin is significantly reduced by cooking and processing. I learned that canned beans tend to have lower levels of lectin than home prepared beans because commercially prepared beans tend to be cooked longer. The longer cooking process supposedly reduces lectin levels. So I tend to cook my beans twice as long at home with the hopes that I am achieving the same effect.

    I don't want to eat out of cans because of the BPA concerns that I'm still not comfortable with.

    The guys that are asserting that wheat products are bad are only doing so because of how it makes their body look.

    I tend to be able to have my best strength training workouts while carbed up on wholewheat pasta. I tend to be the strongest too. My my training style is explosive and fewer reps.

    I can't comment on the physiology regarding my innards at this time. I don't feel achy or stiff when eating gluten.


    Like I said, for guys who workout on a two-dimensional exercise field gluten is fine. Lift your weights and eat your wheat, but it's destroying you.
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE May 24, 2012 2:48 PM GMT
    no more sammiches?

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    QUOTE May 24, 2012 3:08 PM GMT
    A friend of mine just read Wheat Belly while I was reading Why Are We Fat? by Gary Taubes, and they overlap a great deal.

    Taubes' hypothesis is that the high (and progressively rising) level of carbohydrates in our diets over the last few centuries has destroyed our ability to regulate insulin, and this in turn has led to the rise of metabolic syndrome and many types of cancers. Taubes acknowledges that some people are less susceptible to the carb-induced insulin insensitivity than others, but he also goes further than Davis and puts the blame on fructose as well as the starchy carbohydrates in grains. His explanation for this is that fruits we eat today have been bred for centuries to be sweeter and juicier than they were generations ago, and many are actually hybrids that our ancestors wouldn't have recognised.

    On a personal note last summer I followed the diet advice in The Four-Hour Body which is actually very similar to Taubes' advice: no fruit, no beer, no starchy carbohydrates (ie grain or potato). I lost 7kg in 3 months, even with having a cheat day once a week where anything was fair game. Taubes would go even more hardcore, eliminating the cheat day and also eliminating legumes.
  • MuchMoreThanM... Posts: 21242
    QUOTE May 24, 2012 3:15 PM GMT
    streamline said

    Like I said, for guys who workout on a two-dimensional exercise field gluten is fine. Lift your weights and eat your wheat, but it's destroying you.


    I read what you said earlier. But... "workout on a two-dimensional exercise field...?"

    I'm guessing that English is not your first language.
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE May 24, 2012 3:21 PM GMT
    I cut out wheat/corn starchy foods for two weeks after starting orthodontics and...lost 5 lbs after about 6 months of half-hearted attempts. Ultimately, both make my sinuses drain, so no love lost there.

    I suspect corn is an even greater threat to America's health. But, I'm not up on the science.
  • hairyandym Posts: 2396
    QUOTE May 24, 2012 3:24 PM GMT
    I'm Celiac...(wheat allergy) so i eat none wheat... lost weight, feel better for it...and my guts don't ache all the time....and i was a wheat junkie...

    it is a killer...
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE May 24, 2012 3:57 PM GMT
    streamline saidI gave up gluten long time, long time. It's great if you're an athlete - not a person who does 30 minutes on a treadmill then lifts weights.
    I'm talking triathletes, swimmers, distance runners, cyclists, etc. Endurance training causes your muscles to become inflamed, that's just the nature of it. But if you're eating gluten in your diet that is also causing more inflammation throughout your entire system. SO, natural training inflammation plus diet-inflicted inflammation and you're slowing your times while increasing your recovery time. I'm not a doctor but I do read. Do your own research, gluten (like dairy) has no benefits in our biology. It's just not an ingredient that was present throughout human evolution.


    AMEN!
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE May 24, 2012 4:07 PM GMT
    I eat wheat and don't have a belly...

    Moderation, and watching your macros
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE May 24, 2012 4:10 PM GMT
    7Famark saidI eat wheat and don't have a belly...

    Moderation, and watching your macros


    You're also really young and keep at it with the exercise, so perhaps your experience can't be generalized. Or maybe it can.

    Anyway, I'm not sure what I think about the "wheat belly" fad and Dr. Davis. He's a cardiologist by trade. Before writing this book, his big deal was tracking your cardiovascular plaque and diet (including eliminating wheat) as a means towards heart health. I had high cholesterol so I have followed some of his advice. But the excerpts I have read from the "wheat belly" book give me pause - lots of unsubstantiated generalizations. It seems like he's sold out, a bit.
  • GWriter Posts: 1444
    QUOTE May 24, 2012 4:13 PM GMT
    I went paleo (no wheat, among other things) two years ago. It's one of the best decisions I ever made.
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE May 24, 2012 4:15 PM GMT
    showme said
    7Famark saidI eat wheat and don't have a belly...

    Moderation, and watching your macros


    You're also really young and keep at it with the exercise, so perhaps your experience can't be generalized. Or maybe it can.

    Anyway, I'm not sure what I think about the "wheat belly" fad and Dr. Davis. He's a cardiologist by trade. Before writing this book, his big deal was tracking your cardiovascular plaque and diet (including eliminating wheat) as a means towards heart health. I had high cholesterol so I have followed some of his advice. But the excerpts I have read from the "wheat belly" book give me pause - lots of unsubstantiated generalizations. It seems like he's sold out, a bit.


    I guess that could be a part of it...but I find that I am generally against diets that advocate cutting out certain products that aren't that bad in moderation. Whole wheats and grains can be a part of a healthy diet.

    Particularly the paleo diet. It seems like the people that follow it tout it as the be-all-end-all in dieting and it really isn't.