Enriched whole wheat flour

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 25, 2012 5:46 AM GMT
    So my weakness is pizza and I found a place I like that has whole wheat dough. The indgredients however say "enriched whole wheat flour" and everything I've ever read says that if its enriched - its not whole wheat. So I turned to google but can only find information on enriched flour or enriched white flour...but nothing on enriched whole wheat.

    So are the two terms impossible to use together as I suspect? Meaning its not really whole wheat?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 25, 2012 2:20 PM GMT
    Thanks, so I guess their ad is essentially a blatant lie because it says its whole grain dough but then only lists enriched whole wheat flour?

    This is copied directly from their website:

    Whole Grain Dough

    Whole wheat enriched flour, spring water, canola oil, pure natural honey, wheat germ, sugar, salt, baking powder, yeast, diacetyl tartaric acid ester of mono diglycerides, ascorbic acid, amylase
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 25, 2012 3:53 PM GMT
    uoft23 saidThanks, so I guess their ad is essentially a blatant lie because it says its whole grain dough but then only lists enriched whole wheat flour?

    This is copied directly from their website:

    Whole Grain Dough

    Whole wheat enriched flour, spring water, canola oil, pure natural honey, wheat germ, sugar, salt, baking powder, yeast, diacetyl tartaric acid ester of mono diglycerides, ascorbic acid, amylase


    I am learning more and more about the myth of "whole grain" products. Specifically wheat, but also the other "starchy" grains including my beloved oats. There are organic components in wheat which developed as natures way of keeping the grains from being eaten by predators. There are also components of grains, specifically wheat and more specifically the mutated versions which are grown by agribusiness today which make this grain the worst of the lot.

    Google: gliadin; lectin; amylopectin A
    ...and you will begin to learn some horrifyingly sad facts.

    Google the words "glycemic index" to the name of your favorite grain (i.e. oats, amarynth, spelt, wheat, rice, rye) and the news is still not good.

    Even quinoa, which I have loved for quite some time has the problem of the saponin coating which punches holes in the intestinal walls allowing things which should not be in the bloodstream...into the bloodstream. Washing does not remove all of the saponins. :-(

    I'm really having an epiphany regarding grains in general and am beginning to see how a diet comprised of what has been termed "Paleo" foods is starting to make some sense.

    This is especially tough for me right now because I'm still in a financial recovery mode and can hardly afford to spend more on food...yet like my necessary prescriptions I see little choice. It's either that or risk the Type II Diabetes and other maladies which my own parents suffer from.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 25, 2012 3:57 PM GMT
    Go Paleo! I've never felt better since dropping the gluten, grains, legumes, added sugar, dairy and booze. It takes a few weeks to get your body adjusted but it's well worth it. All the insulin spikes really do wreck havoc during a busy day and active lifestyle.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 25, 2012 5:43 PM GMT
    Ya, I won't be giving up grains or alcohol. icon_lol.gif But if I can eat whole grain I would prefer to but their information seems to contradict itself.
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    May 25, 2012 5:49 PM GMT
    unless congress has changed it's labeling structure, and it easily could have, you're not allowed to say whole wheat unless it's 100% whole wheat. does it say 100% whole wheat on the bag?

    the idea behind the enriching of flour is restoring some of the vitamins and nutrients lost in the bleaching process and/or in the removing of the outer parts of the wheat. theoretically, you can enrich a whole grain if you wanted to load it up with say calcium or something....

    so while it's not common (never in all my years in a bakery) to see whole wheat flour that's been enriched, it's not necessarily anymore than them fortifying the whole grain with more things.
  • gwuinsf

    Posts: 525

    May 25, 2012 6:04 PM GMT
    imasrxd saidGo Paleo! I've never felt better since dropping the gluten, grains, legumes, added sugar, dairy and booze. It takes a few weeks to get your body adjusted but it's well worth it. All the insulin spikes really do wreck havoc during a busy day and active lifestyle.


    Thirded! I have had a set of health and wellness issues that have vanished since going Paleo. I attribute it to the toxins in wheat as mentioned above.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 25, 2012 6:13 PM GMT
    calibro saidunless congress has changed it's labeling structure, and it easily could have, you're not allowed to say whole wheat unless it's 100% whole wheat. does it say 100% whole wheat on the bag?

    the idea behind the enriching of flour is restoring some of the vitamins and nutrients lost in the bleaching process and/or in the removing of the outer parts of the wheat. theoretically, you can enrich a whole grain if you wanted to load it up with say calcium or something....

    so while it's not common (never in all my years in a bakery) to see whole wheat flour that's been enriched, it's not necessarily anymore than them fortifying the whole grain with more things.


    I'm in Canada and we have no such law to my knowledge although I think its in the works. They don't claim 100%, but they have only that one ingredient listed which by law does have to be accurate.

    From what I've read about enriching is exactly what you said. I guess thats why I can't find an example online of enriched whole grains though because why would someone enrich a whole grain? That sounds unecessary and I would assume would add extra cost with little benefit since most people seeking healther choices prefer less processed options.

    I just wrote the company involved but I'm expecting some customer service rep to just send me a half baked form response so really don't expect much in the way of information.
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    May 25, 2012 6:19 PM GMT
    uoft23 said
    calibro saidunless congress has changed it's labeling structure, and it easily could have, you're not allowed to say whole wheat unless it's 100% whole wheat. does it say 100% whole wheat on the bag?

    the idea behind the enriching of flour is restoring some of the vitamins and nutrients lost in the bleaching process and/or in the removing of the outer parts of the wheat. theoretically, you can enrich a whole grain if you wanted to load it up with say calcium or something....

    so while it's not common (never in all my years in a bakery) to see whole wheat flour that's been enriched, it's not necessarily anymore than them fortifying the whole grain with more things.


    I'm in Canada and we have no such law to my knowledge although I think its in the works. They don't claim 100%, but they have only that one ingredient listed which by law does have to be accurate.

    From what I've read about enriching is exactly what you said. I guess thats why I can't find an example online of enriched whole grains though because why would someone enrich a whole grain? That sounds unecessary and I would assume would add extra cost with little benefit since most people seeking healther choices prefer less processed options.

    I just wrote the company involved but I'm expecting some customer service rep to just send me a half baked form response so really don't expect much in the way of information.


    oh then that's easy. last i heard, in canada you can call something whole grain if it's not completely whole grain. it's probably a mixture of whole grain and enriched wheat.

    here's what wikipedia has to say...

    "In Canada, it is legal to advertise any food product as "whole wheat" with up to 70% of the germ removed.[3] While the resulting product will contain the benefit of fiber in the nutritional information, it lacks the more recently discovered health benefits of antioxidants found in the wheat germ. Canadian consumers can be assured of whole-grain products by a label stating 100% whole-grain whole wheat."
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 25, 2012 6:23 PM GMT
    Ah, so if they mix it, they can list it as one ingredient item, and so long as at least most of it is whole grain, they can call the dough whole grain. That makes sense and sounds like something underhanded enough to believe too haha.

    Thanks!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 25, 2012 9:41 PM GMT
    I would definitely stay away from 'enriched' anything, as they add synthetic vitamins that my body can't metabolize naturally. They make me feel strange and not rested. Vitamin E is sometimes added = bad !
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    May 25, 2012 10:07 PM GMT
    Oy veh!

    Learn to make your own pizza.

    The advantage of having found this place that uses enriched whole wheat flour is that it is probably a little better than white flour. A step in a good direction, but not perfect.