Protein Bars

  • BDRoland

    Posts: 49

    May 29, 2012 10:57 PM GMT
    I'm sure this has been discussed at length before on this forum but I wanted to start a new topic anyway to get some opinions on my specific case. I currently weigh 132 lbs and I'm trying to gain weight. My trainer has told me to up my protein intake and I am trying but I'm not a big eater as it is. Anyway my question is about protein bars and how much they could help or hurt someone like me. I got to the gym about 3-4 times a week and I'm focusing on muscle gain. Would eating protein bars like "Clif" be a good idea for snacks or do the cons (how processed it is) out weigh the pros. Thanks guys.
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    May 30, 2012 1:37 AM GMT
    you should try making your own instead of buying it, i have a really good recipe but can't find it right now ill look for it n let you know :p
    and you should only eat those if you have to, real foods always better...
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    May 30, 2012 4:12 AM GMT
    There ok to replace a meal now and then, there made much much better then years ago...I can tell you that!LOL But nothing beats real food!
  • mybud

    Posts: 11837

    May 30, 2012 4:24 AM GMT
    Protein bars will provide minimal calories... Try looking into a good weight gainer shake...
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    May 31, 2012 2:09 PM GMT
    I remember buying protein bars frequintly at GNC, complete waist of money, stick to real food and protein shakes, with hard training you'll see better results for sure.
  • gwuinsf

    Posts: 525

    May 31, 2012 7:53 PM GMT
    I agree with stick to whole foods, but I keep several boxes with me at home and at work for when I want something quick and easy. At my office, our kitchen is stocked full of junk food, so if I'm starving I'd rather have a protein bar then succumb to my hunger and start pigging out on M&Ms and cookies.

    They should not be a central part of your diet.
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    May 31, 2012 8:12 PM GMT
    jK87 saidyou should try making your own instead of buying it, i have a really good recipe but can't find it right now ill look for it n let you know :p
    and you should only eat those if you have to, real foods always better...


    I would not mind having that recipe, too - if you don't mind.

    Thanks.
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    May 31, 2012 8:27 PM GMT
    I agree with much of the post comments already, for really good gains, you need more intake of good food proteins as well as a Whey Protein Shake....protein bars will really not do the job. Most of them have high concentration of sugar, they are great for instant energy boost or when you are driving and need some immediate snack.
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    May 31, 2012 8:46 PM GMT
    Protein shakes are more cost effective. I really don't understand the point of protein bars. Exactly how much protein is in a protein bar anyway? I doubt it would be more than a scoop of whey.
  • jim_sf

    Posts: 2094

    May 31, 2012 8:54 PM GMT
    I get protein bars occasionally, either to keep at my desk for a quick snack or to keep in my kit bag for those really rough practices/matches. They may not be as dense a protein source as shakes, but they are a whole lot more portable.
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    May 31, 2012 9:02 PM GMT
    BDRoland saidI'm sure this has been discussed at length before on this forum but I wanted to start a new topic anyway to get some opinions on my specific case. I currently weigh 132 lbs and I'm trying to gain weight. My trainer has told me to up my protein intake and I am trying but I'm not a big eater as it is. Anyway my question is about protein bars and how much they could help or hurt someone like me. I got to the gym about 3-4 times a week and I'm focusing on muscle gain. Would eating protein bars like "Clif" be a good idea for snacks or do the cons (how processed it is) out weigh the pros. Thanks guys.


    The thing about the majority of protein bars is that they contain a lot of sugar and cheap ingredients, and use cheap protein - usually whey, or soy. Many of them are really candy bars with added sugar.

    Some excellent sources of protein are eggs, chicken, fish, beef, tuna, cottage cheese. Clif bars, which you mentioned, aren't bad for energy before/after training, but I believe they have 9-10 grams of protein per bar so as an overall strategy for getting your protein in, they are better used for energy.

    If you are looking to gain quality weight, you should be relying on whole foods as much as possible, varying it up frequently, and shy away from processed foods in general.

    The foods above helped me greatly when I was still into powerlifting and carrying 40+ more pounds more (much of it muscle) on my frame.. that's before I found Krav Maga of course icon_smile.gif But a good site for nutrition articles is also www.tmuscle.com - just ignore the incessant product promotion.
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    May 31, 2012 9:19 PM GMT
    About the only advantage to the bars is that they're portable, as someone else mentioned. Some have decent amounts of protein and low sugar- read the labels.

    A good source for additional kcals if your looking to gain weight is nuts- almonds, peanuts(I know, a legume), walnuts, etc. are all very calorie dense. Unsalted is best.
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    May 31, 2012 9:21 PM GMT
    They're my excuse to eat a candy bar. icon_razz.gif
  • jim_sf

    Posts: 2094

    May 31, 2012 9:27 PM GMT
    Sungod17 saidread the labels.


    Best. Food-related. Advice. EVER.
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    May 31, 2012 9:30 PM GMT
    Just another thought.. the ones with very low sugar use something called "sugar alcohols" which are similar in molecular structure to sugars, but are modified and do not cause as strong an insulin response as sugar. These are not listed as sugars, although some bars will show you how many grams of sugar alcohol they contain. Example of sugar alcohols are glycol, glycerol, maltitol, inositol, sorbitol etc.

    These bars are ok in a pinch, but will not provide you with the *nutrition* which real food provides (vitamins, minerals, etc)
  • BDRoland

    Posts: 49

    May 31, 2012 10:59 PM GMT
    Thanks for the response everyone!! I feel a lot more educated now icon_smile.gif