Are You Ashamed of Your Culture?

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    Jun 03, 2012 10:32 PM GMT
    Are You Ashamed of Your Culture?

    Hey guys...this thread is for Latinos who seem to want to disassociate with their culture.

    There's a term know as a 'Watino' - A watino is a fake latino. A new way to act as a latino according to Urban Dictionary.

    But....I've notice more and more younger Latino men and even women who though having a Latino surname, don't even know or want to learn the language.

    Even more surprising is that though they may enjoy the food and perhaps the music.....they hardly want to embrace their culture and prefer instead to be 'American'.

    For example at work....I know of three people who have Latino surnames and yet do not know a word of Spanish and when asked....they give me a terrified look.

    Your thoughts on this guys............

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    Jun 03, 2012 10:38 PM GMT
    Well, what do you expect? Not everyone in the US with a Hispanic last name is a recent immigrant or has any interest in their ancestor's culture. Many are the descendants of Mexicans, Spanish, and other groups who have been in US territory for centuries. Assimilation happens either by force or by choice. The language and the culture of an immigrant family tends to disappear within a couple of generations.

    I don't assume that anyone with the last name López, García, or Rodríguez speaks Spanish because millions of Hispanics in the US don't. Many have lived in the US for so many generations that they're as American as any other American of German or British descent. Others were discouraged by their parents or by outside forces from speaking Spanish. And finally, maybe some had no interest in the language and just wanted to blend in with everyone else. That's their choice and I don't think any less of them.

    Germans are the largest ancestry group in the US. However, only 1/10 of German Americans even speak German at home. Same with many Americans of Polish, Italian, Chinese, and other descents.
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    Jun 03, 2012 10:41 PM GMT
    That's what happens when you breed in the US.
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    Jun 03, 2012 10:44 PM GMT
    pocketnico saidWell, what do you expect? Not everyone in the US with a Hispanic last name is a recent immigrant or has any interest in their ancestor's culture. Many are the descendants of Mexicans, Spanish, and other groups who have been in US territory for centuries. Assimilation happens either by force or by choice. The language and the culture of an immigrant family tends to disappear within a couple of generations.

    Germans are the largest ancestry group in the US. However, only 1/10 of German Americans even speak German at home. Same with many Americans of Polish, Italian, Chinese, and other descents.



    But the irony is that even Caucasions, Filipinos and the Chinese know the language quite well so much so that you can carry on a decent conversation with them.

    In other words....there exists the interest in learning the language which sadly is absent from someone perceived as already knowing it.

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    Jun 03, 2012 10:47 PM GMT
    Hermes63 said
    pocketnico saidWell, what do you expect? Not everyone in the US with a Hispanic last name is a recent immigrant or has any interest in their ancestor's culture. Many are the descendants of Mexicans, Spanish, and other groups who have been in US territory for centuries. Assimilation happens either by force or by choice. The language and the culture of an immigrant family tends to disappear within a couple of generations.

    Germans are the largest ancestry group in the US. However, only 1/10 of German Americans even speak German at home. Same with many Americans of Polish, Italian, Chinese, and other descents.



    But the irony is that even Caucasions, Filipinos and the Chinese know the language quite well so much so that you can carry on a decent conversation with them.

    In other words....there exists the interest in learning the language which sadly is absent from someone perceived as already knowing it.




    There are plenty of Filipinos who don't speak Tagalog and plenty of Chinese who don't speak Mandarin or Cantonese. I know far more Chinese and Filipinos who are English monoglots than those who are bilingual. As for "Caucasians", are you talking about British descendants or European people in general?
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    Jun 03, 2012 10:50 PM GMT
    Isnt that the way it works.

    First generation comes to a country. Doesnt speak the language, etc

    Second generation speaks both languages and can find the old country on the map.

    Third generation only speaks new language and a few words of the old language for the grandparents. Knows the name of the country their grandparents came from and that's all.

    Fourth generation hasnt a clue.


    My german ancestors came to America 302 (paternal side) and 146 (maternal side) years ago. Cant say we've kept the language alive in the family. (Aber ich habe Deutsch zwei und halb Jahre an der Universitaet studiert. Aber das war vor 39 Jahre. Deshalb ich habe alles vergessen.) icon_biggrin.gif
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    Jun 03, 2012 10:54 PM GMT
    pocketnico said
    Hermes63 said
    pocketnico saidWell, what do you expect? Not everyone in the US with a Hispanic last name is a recent immigrant or has any interest in their ancestor's culture. Many are the descendants of Mexicans, Spanish, and other groups who have been in US territory for centuries. Assimilation happens either by force or by choice. The language and the culture of an immigrant family tends to disappear within a couple of generations.

    Germans are the largest ancestry group in the US. However, only 1/10 of German Americans even speak German at home. Same with many Americans of Polish, Italian, Chinese, and other descents.



    But the irony is that even Caucasions, Filipinos and the Chinese know the language quite well so much so that you can carry on a decent conversation with them.

    In other words....there exists the interest in learning the language which sadly is absent from someone perceived as already knowing it.




    There are plenty of Filipinos who don't speak Tagalog and plenty of Chinese who don't speak Mandarin or Cantonese. I know far more Chinese and Filipinos who are English monoglots than those who are bilingual. As for "Caucasians", are you talking about British descendants or European people in general?


    lol....without going into a dissertation on racial typology here...I'm referring to a fair-skinned persons with blue or brown eyes...your typical looking 'American'....
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    Jun 03, 2012 10:57 PM GMT
    Hermes63 said
    pocketnico said
    Hermes63 said
    pocketnico saidWell, what do you expect? Not everyone in the US with a Hispanic last name is a recent immigrant or has any interest in their ancestor's culture. Many are the descendants of Mexicans, Spanish, and other groups who have been in US territory for centuries. Assimilation happens either by force or by choice. The language and the culture of an immigrant family tends to disappear within a couple of generations.

    Germans are the largest ancestry group in the US. However, only 1/10 of German Americans even speak German at home. Same with many Americans of Polish, Italian, Chinese, and other descents.



    But the irony is that even Caucasions, Filipinos and the Chinese know the language quite well so much so that you can carry on a decent conversation with them.

    In other words....there exists the interest in learning the language which sadly is absent from someone perceived as already knowing it.




    There are plenty of Filipinos who don't speak Tagalog and plenty of Chinese who don't speak Mandarin or Cantonese. I know far more Chinese and Filipinos who are English monoglots than those who are bilingual. As for "Caucasians", are you talking about British descendants or European people in general?


    lol....without going into a dissertation on racial typology here...I'm referring to a fair-skinned persons with blue or brown eyes...your typical looking 'American'....



    What about them? Sure, many are descendants of the UK and Ireland, but many are not. It's hard enough for people in the UK and Ireland to keep Welsh, Scottish & Irish Gaelic, Cornish, and Manx alive. You really expect Americans of these descendants to keep those languages alive all the way across the pond too?
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    Jun 03, 2012 11:03 PM GMT
    pocketnico said
    Hermes63 said
    pocketnico said
    Hermes63 said
    pocketnico saidWell, what do you expect? Not everyone in the US with a Hispanic last name is a recent immigrant or has any interest in their ancestor's culture. Many are the descendants of Mexicans, Spanish, and other groups who have been in US territory for centuries. Assimilation happens either by force or by choice. The language and the culture of an immigrant family tends to disappear within a couple of generations.

    Germans are the largest ancestry group in the US. However, only 1/10 of German Americans even speak German at home. Same with many Americans of Polish, Italian, Chinese, and other descents.



    But the irony is that even Caucasions, Filipinos and the Chinese know the language quite well so much so that you can carry on a decent conversation with them.

    In other words....there exists the interest in learning the language which sadly is absent from someone perceived as already knowing it.




    There are plenty of Filipinos who don't speak Tagalog and plenty of Chinese who don't speak Mandarin or Cantonese. I know far more Chinese and Filipinos who are English monoglots than those who are bilingual. As for "Caucasians", are you talking about British descendants or European people in general?


    lol....without going into a dissertation on racial typology here...I'm referring to a fair-skinned persons with blue or brown eyes...your typical looking 'American'....



    What about them? Sure, many are descendants of the UK and Ireland, but many are not. It's hard enough for people in the UK and Ireland to keep Welsh, Scottish & Irish Gaelic, Cornish, and Manx alive. You really expect Americans of these descendants to keep those languages alive all the way across the pond too?


    And why not? I have a surname that is Anglo-Saxon yet I embrace and speak, read and write Spanish very well.

    I could have easily assimilated into the 'American' culture and forgotten my roots....but I chose not to....see for me learning to speak any language be it Spanish or say German....lets others know how much of a cultured person you are....
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    Jun 03, 2012 11:10 PM GMT
    I don't think being "cultured" makes you any better of a person than anyone else. It's simply a difference in interests. There are plenty of people who are interested in languages and cultures that have no connection to their heritage. They simply enjoy the challenge of various languages or admire something from another culture.

    Besides, everyone is such a mish-mash of everything that's pretty much a waste trying to emphasize any particular roots because you just never know for sure where the hell you come from. You might have records of past family, but documents can be altered. Plenty of people lie about their family history as well. Plus, many of us simply have no idea and probably never will be able to find out unless we go for genetic testing (which is still limited anyway).

    As far as I'm concerned, once you're on this side of the world, everyone outside treats as American anyway. Despite America's large British and German heritage, not many Germans and Brits treat us as their kin. Sure, they know all about the influence of their ancestors in America, but we've been separated for so long that we don't really feel *that* close. They simply see us as American.
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    Jun 03, 2012 11:15 PM GMT
    pocketnico saidWell, what do you expect? Not everyone in the US with a Hispanic last name is a recent immigrant or has any interest in their ancestor's culture. Many are the descendants of Mexicans, Spanish, and other groups who have been in US territory for centuries. Assimilation happens either by force or by choice. The language and the culture of an immigrant family tends to disappear within a couple of generations.

    I don't assume that anyone with the last name López, García, or Rodríguez speaks Spanish because millions of Hispanics in the US don't. Many have lived in the US for so many generations that they're as American as any other American of German or British descent. Others were discouraged by their parents or by outside forces from speaking Spanish. And finally, maybe some had no interest in the language and just wanted to blend in with everyone else. That's their choice and I don't think any less of them.

    Germans are the largest ancestry group in the US. However, only 1/10 of German Americans even speak German at home. Same with many Americans of Polish, Italian, Chinese, and other descents.


    this pretty much sums of the thread in a neat paragraph form.

    Pocketnico: 1 OP: 0
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    Jun 03, 2012 11:40 PM GMT
    In the end, I would prefer people to see me for who I am, for all the things I can control. I can't change my heritage. Why should it matter where my ancestors came from X years ago? I'm here now and living my own life. I don't really see myself as someone who cares about being American, Spanish, Scottish, or Mexican. I'm simply me.

    My dad's family mainly comes from the mountains in Virginia. Many of those people are of Irish, Scottish, German, and French descent. There are many common Scottish names in my family. However, my dad's family has been in Virginia for centuries. How "Scottish" have we remained? I'm sure they blend in with all the other Appalachian people by now.

    My mom's family comes from Mexico and Spain. Both my mother and her parents were born and raised in the US. My great-grandparents were the ones born abroad who later immigrated to Texas. My grandmother speaks Spanglish while my mother can understand Spanish but doesn't speak it. I imagine my mother and her parents grew up during a time where speaking Spanish was considered a disadvantage, so neither took much pride in keeping the language.

    Meanwhile, I myself was born in Spain by chance because my parents were stationed at the US Naval Base in Rota. I speak Spanish because I lived the first 6 years of my life in Spain, otherwise both of my parents speak English. When my family moved to the US, I decided to continue learning Spanish out of interest and possible career opportunities later in life. I ended up doing the same with Russian as a teenager (I have no Russian ancestry).

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    Jun 03, 2012 11:50 PM GMT
    pocketnico saidI don't think being "cultured" makes you any better of a person than anyone else. It's simply a difference in interests. There are plenty of people who are interested in languages and cultures that have no connection to their heritage. They simply enjoy the challenge of various languages or admire something from another culture.

    Besides, everyone is such a mish-mash of everything that's pretty much a waste trying to emphasize any particular roots because you just never know for sure where the hell you come from. You might have records of past family, but documents can be altered. Plenty of people lie about their family history as well. Plus, many of us simply have no idea and probably never will be able to find out unless we go for genetic testing (which is still limited anyway).

    As far as I'm concerned, once you're on this side of the world, everyone outside treats as American anyway. Despite America's large British and German heritage, not many Germans and Brits treat us as their kin. Sure, they know all about the influence of their ancestors in America, but we've been separated for so long that we don't really feel *that* close. They simply see us as American.



    My purpose of this thread was to share opinions not invite verbal fisticuffs.

    And like noses...everyone has an opinion although yours certainly differs from mines from one end of the spectrum to the other.

    But then again you're young, so you have no understanding of how important it is to cling to your culture.....in spite of "where the hell you came from,"

    Just because you're in America doesn't necessarily mean you should forego where you came from and since you sound so self-assured in your response...I'll treat it as 'PURA TONTERIA'
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    Jun 03, 2012 11:50 PM GMT
    Caslon19000 saidIsnt that the way it works.

    First generation comes to a country. Doesnt speak the language, etc

    Second generation speaks both languages and can find the old country on the map.

    Third generation only speaks new language and a few words of the old language for the grandparents. Knows the name of the country their grandparents came from and that's all.

    Fourth generation hasnt a clue.


    My german ancestors came to America 302 (paternal side) and 146 (maternal side) years ago. Cant say we've kept the language alive in the family. (Aber ich habe Deutsch zwei und halb Jahre an der Universitaet studiert. Aber das war vor 39 Jahre. Deshalb ich habe alles vergessen.) icon_biggrin.gif



    The above generation scale, is EXACTLY the case of myself and my family, so precise. I am of the generation that just knows a few words for the grandma.
  • TheBizMan

    Posts: 4091

    Jun 03, 2012 11:51 PM GMT
    I'm not ashamed of my culture, I'm just to lazy to learn spanish.
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    Jun 03, 2012 11:55 PM GMT
    Caslon19000 saidIsnt that the way it works.

    First generation comes to a country. Doesnt speak the language, etc

    Second generation speaks both languages and can find the old country on the map.

    Third generation only speaks new language and a few words of the old language for the grandparents. Knows the name of the country their grandparents came from and that's all.

    Fourth generation hasnt a clue.


    My german ancestors came to America 302 (paternal side) and 146 (maternal side) years ago. Cant say we've kept the language alive in the family. (Aber ich habe Deutsch zwei und halb Jahre an der Universitaet studiert. Aber das war vor 39 Jahre. Deshalb ich habe alles vergessen.) icon_biggrin.gif


    100% agree. That is what happens when your family migrates to a new culture. Your old culture fades away. By the third or fourth generation most feel little to no ties to there old culture anyway.... they Identify as just American as they should IMO. America is a mixture of everything. The only true americans are the native american hence the word native...
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    Jun 03, 2012 11:56 PM GMT
    Hermes63 said
    pocketnico saidI don't think being "cultured" makes you any better of a person than anyone else. It's simply a difference in interests. There are plenty of people who are interested in languages and cultures that have no connection to their heritage. They simply enjoy the challenge of various languages or admire something from another culture.

    Besides, everyone is such a mish-mash of everything that's pretty much a waste trying to emphasize any particular roots because you just never know for sure where the hell you come from. You might have records of past family, but documents can be altered. Plenty of people lie about their family history as well. Plus, many of us simply have no idea and probably never will be able to find out unless we go for genetic testing (which is still limited anyway).

    As far as I'm concerned, once you're on this side of the world, everyone outside treats as American anyway. Despite America's large British and German heritage, not many Germans and Brits treat us as their kin. Sure, they know all about the influence of their ancestors in America, but we've been separated for so long that we don't really feel *that* close. They simply see us as American.



    My purpose of this thread was to share opinions not invite verbal fisticuffs.

    And like noses...everyone has an opinion although yours certainly differs from mines from one end of the spectrum to the other.

    But then again you're young, so you have no understanding of how important it is to cling to your culture.....in spite of "where the hell you came from,"

    Just because you're in America doesn't necessarily mean you should forego where you came from and since you sound so self-assured in your response...I'll treat it as 'PURA TONTERIA'



    Basically what I'm saying is that I find it more important to be my own person and pursue my own happiness regardless of my nationality or heritage because none of that has anything to do with who I am. It's not my "job" to carry on whatever my Appalachian, Mexican, Scottish, and Spanish ancestors started centuries ago. I simply don't place much importance on my ethnic background because in the end it doesn't matter. I'm a mix of a bunch of shit like most people anyway. I mean, do you see modern Spaniards trying to carry on the culture of their Celtic, Phoenician, Iberian, Roman, Gothic, Jewish, and Arab ancestors? No, not really. Everything blended over the course of time along with globalization, and so they are who they are now

    For most of my life, life has been America. I don't see myself returning to Spain anytime soon because the economic situation in Spain doesn't present any opportunities for me that I already have here. And truth by told, most Western Europeans and North Americans are not really that different from each other anyway. The differences that exist are really quite small and trivial.

    No me digas más gilipolleces.
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    Jun 04, 2012 12:05 AM GMT
    pocketnico said
    Hermes63 said
    pocketnico saidI don't think being "cultured" makes you any better of a person than anyone else. It's simply a difference in interests. There are plenty of people who are interested in languages and cultures that have no connection to their heritage. They simply enjoy the challenge of various languages or admire something from another culture.

    Besides, everyone is such a mish-mash of everything that's pretty much a waste trying to emphasize any particular roots because you just never know for sure where the hell you come from. You might have records of past family, but documents can be altered. Plenty of people lie about their family history as well. Plus, many of us simply have no idea and probably never will be able to find out unless we go for genetic testing (which is still limited anyway).

    As far as I'm concerned, once you're on this side of the world, everyone outside treats as American anyway. Despite America's large British and German heritage, not many Germans and Brits treat us as their kin. Sure, they know all about the influence of their ancestors in America, but we've been separated for so long that we don't really feel *that* close. They simply see us as American.



    My purpose of this thread was to share opinions not invite verbal fisticuffs.

    And like noses...everyone has an opinion although yours certainly differs from mines from one end of the spectrum to the other.

    But then again you're young, so you have no understanding of how important it is to cling to your culture.....in spite of "where the hell you came from,"

    Just because you're in America doesn't necessarily mean you should forego where you came from and since you sound so self-assured in your response...I'll treat it as 'PURA TONTERIA'



    Basically what I'm saying is that I find it more important to be my own person and pursue my own happiness regardless of my nationality or heritage because none of that has anything to do with who I am. I'm a human being just like anyone else on this planet.

    For most of my life, that's been in America. I don't see myself returning to Spain anytime soon because the economic situation in Spain doesn't present any opportunities for me that I already have here. And truth by told, most Western Europeans and North Americans are not really that different from each other anyway. The differences that exist are really quite small and trivial.

    No me digas más gilipolleces.


    Mijo....lo ultimo que quiero hacer es a cambiar tu caracter a pesar de tu joventud.

    Cuando llegas a mi edad....tal vez vas a tener otro opinion.
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    Jun 04, 2012 12:08 AM GMT
    Hermes63 said
    pocketnico said
    Hermes63 said
    pocketnico saidI don't think being "cultured" makes you any better of a person than anyone else. It's simply a difference in interests. There are plenty of people who are interested in languages and cultures that have no connection to their heritage. They simply enjoy the challenge of various languages or admire something from another culture.

    Besides, everyone is such a mish-mash of everything that's pretty much a waste trying to emphasize any particular roots because you just never know for sure where the hell you come from. You might have records of past family, but documents can be altered. Plenty of people lie about their family history as well. Plus, many of us simply have no idea and probably never will be able to find out unless we go for genetic testing (which is still limited anyway).

    As far as I'm concerned, once you're on this side of the world, everyone outside treats as American anyway. Despite America's large British and German heritage, not many Germans and Brits treat us as their kin. Sure, they know all about the influence of their ancestors in America, but we've been separated for so long that we don't really feel *that* close. They simply see us as American.



    My purpose of this thread was to share opinions not invite verbal fisticuffs.

    And like noses...everyone has an opinion although yours certainly differs from mines from one end of the spectrum to the other.

    But then again you're young, so you have no understanding of how important it is to cling to your culture.....in spite of "where the hell you came from,"

    Just because you're in America doesn't necessarily mean you should forego where you came from and since you sound so self-assured in your response...I'll treat it as 'PURA TONTERIA'



    Basically what I'm saying is that I find it more important to be my own person and pursue my own happiness regardless of my nationality or heritage because none of that has anything to do with who I am. I'm a human being just like anyone else on this planet.

    For most of my life, that's been in America. I don't see myself returning to Spain anytime soon because the economic situation in Spain doesn't present any opportunities for me that I already have here. And truth by told, most Western Europeans and North Americans are not really that different from each other anyway. The differences that exist are really quite small and trivial.

    No me digas más gilipolleces.


    Mijo....lo ultimo que quiero hacer es a cambiar tu caracter a pesar de tu joventud.

    Cuando llegas a mi edad....tal vez vas a tener otro opinion.


    Well, I have to make it to your age before considering a change of opinion. But I think you would know that there's certainly no guarantee that I'll even arrive to that age.
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    Jun 04, 2012 12:17 AM GMT
    pocketnico said
    Hermes63 said
    pocketnico said
    Hermes63 said
    pocketnico saidI don't think being "cultured" makes you any better of a person than anyone else. It's simply a difference in interests. There are plenty of people who are interested in languages and cultures that have no connection to their heritage. They simply enjoy the challenge of various languages or admire something from another culture.

    Besides, everyone is such a mish-mash of everything that's pretty much a waste trying to emphasize any particular roots because you just never know for sure where the hell you come from. You might have records of past family, but documents can be altered. Plenty of people lie about their family history as well. Plus, many of us simply have no idea and probably never will be able to find out unless we go for genetic testing (which is still limited anyway).

    As far as I'm concerned, once you're on this side of the world, everyone outside treats as American anyway. Despite America's large British and German heritage, not many Germans and Brits treat us as their kin. Sure, they know all about the influence of their ancestors in America, but we've been separated for so long that we don't really feel *that* close. They simply see us as American.



    My purpose of this thread was to share opinions not invite verbal fisticuffs.

    And like noses...everyone has an opinion although yours certainly differs from mines from one end of the spectrum to the other.

    But then again you're young, so you have no understanding of how important it is to cling to your culture.....in spite of "where the hell you came from,"

    Just because you're in America doesn't necessarily mean you should forego where you came from and since you sound so self-assured in your response...I'll treat it as 'PURA TONTERIA'



    Basically what I'm saying is that I find it more important to be my own person and pursue my own happiness regardless of my nationality or heritage because none of that has anything to do with who I am. I'm a human being just like anyone else on this planet.

    For most of my life, that's been in America. I don't see myself returning to Spain anytime soon because the economic situation in Spain doesn't present any opportunities for me that I already have here. And truth by told, most Western Europeans and North Americans are not really that different from each other anyway. The differences that exist are really quite small and trivial.

    No me digas más gilipolleces.


    Mijo....lo ultimo que quiero hacer es a cambiar tu caracter a pesar de tu joventud.

    Cuando llegas a mi edad....tal vez vas a tener otro opinion.


    Well, I have to make it to your age before considering a change of opinion. But I think you would know that there's certainly no guarantee that I'll even arrive to that age.



    I just enjoy you being facetious....it just adds another flavor your...sigh......exciting personality.

    And yes...perhaps if you are lucky...you just might reach my age....and if you do......you just might also be lucky to have developed an admiration for your roots.
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    Jun 04, 2012 12:21 AM GMT
    I admire my parents. That's enough for me. They're the people I care most about because they've always encouraged me and supported me. They knew their role well by knowing when to step in and when to step out. I see them as simply my parents and I'm proud of how they did their job. I'm not proud of them for being such-and-such nationality. It doesn't matter.

    It's pretty hard to have a lot of interest and care in people you never knew. While I've certainly heard plenty of stories of past relatives over the years, I don't feel any particular connection with these people because I never met them. Plus I know there's always the possibility that my relatives exaggerate many of those stories. Who knows what the absolute truth about them is?

    We're most affected by the people who are alive and always around us throughout our lives.
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    Jun 04, 2012 12:28 AM GMT
    pocketnico saidI admire my parents. That's enough for me. They're the people I care most about because they've always encouraged me and supported me. They knew their role well by knowing when to step in and when to step out. I see them as simply my parents and I'm proud of how they did their job. I'm not proud of them for being such-and-such nationality. It doesn't matter.

    It's pretty hard to have a lot of interest and care in people you never knew. We're most affected by the people who are alive and always around us throughout our lives.


    Good for you! I'm also proud of and admire my parents as well.

    They also did a great job because growing up...we embraced the traditional American customs like the 4th of July....Thanksgiving to name just a few.

    But though we spoke English in our home....we also spoke Spanish and were told about our culture as well as sampled the delicious foods and heard the music.

    Am I grateful for the exposure? You bet because I can easily talk to someone in Spanish and help them if necessary if they're new to the country or don't know the language.
  • BmwKid92

    Posts: 1097

    Jun 04, 2012 12:47 AM GMT
    at my work this Argentinian guy and spanish lady, hate purto ricans, They say they know broke Spanish and are really dirty people
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    Jun 04, 2012 1:49 AM GMT
    Hermes63 said

    Even more surprising is that though they may enjoy the food and perhaps the music.....they hardly want to embrace their culture and prefer instead to be 'American'.




    My parents are immigrants from the Philippines, and I was born and raised in the US. I consider myself first and foremost "American" because that was the culture I was born into. I don't think there is anything wrong with preferring to identify yourself as American if you were born here. Nor do I think being uninterested in your familial roots necessarily signifies shame.

    I've read about Philippine history and I know a tiny bit of Tagalog and Ilocano (a regional dialect), if only to better understand my parents' and grandparents' perspectives. I enjoy (some) Filipino food, and I have a profound respect for the beauty and diversity of cultures even within the Philippines itself.

    I have no particular interest, however, in fully "embracing" a culture that I have no meaningful relation to outside of the fact that my parents happened to be from said culture. I know my cultural roots, and I respect that Philippine culture has influenced the way I was raised. But like most things I learn about, I take from it what I think is useful and discard what I think is useless.
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    Jun 04, 2012 2:11 AM GMT
    I thought I'd noticed the more recent immigrants holding on more to their origins these days than they did in the past. Probably I was not aware of what generation American they might be. I guess the melting pot is still set on assimilate. We are the Borg.

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