Pres Clinton breaks with Obama on extending Bush-era tax rates

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    Jun 05, 2012 10:30 PM GMT
    http://thehill.com/video/in-the-news/231019-bill-clinton-placeholder

    Former President Clinton broke with President Obama over the Bush-era tax rates, saying he has “no problem” with extending them temporarily.

    “I don't have any problem with extending all of it now, including the current spending level,” Clinton told CNBC Tuesday in a taped interview for "Closing Bell."

    Obama only wants to extend the tax rate for middle-class taxpayers — and not for the wealthy — when the rates expire on Jan. 1.

    Clinton, however, said all the rates should not be extended permanently.

    “The real issue is whether the price the Republican House will put on that extension is the permanent extension of the tax cuts, which I think is an error,” he said.

    House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) has pressed to extend the tax rates immediately, before the November election, but has said the decision over whether to act to make the extension permanent or temporary has not been made.

    Clinton said it would probably be “best” to push the extension through early next year.

    “But the Republicans don't want to do that unless [Obama] agrees to extend the tax cuts permanently, including for upper-income people,” he said. “And I don't think the president should do that.”

    Republicans quickly blasted out Clinton’s remarks as him breaking with Obama.

    “Agree [with] former President Clinton,” Boehner tweeted. “Raising taxes next year would be bad for [for] jobs.”

    But Clinton did not entirely side with Republicans in the interview.

    "What I think we need to do is find some way to avoid the fiscal cliff, to avoid doing anything that would contract the economy now, and then deal with what's necessary in the long term debt-reduction plans as soon as they can, which presumably would be after the election," Clinton said.

    “But what I think the president is right about is not wanting to make any commitments that will constrain our ability to have a long-term debt reduction plan," he continued, "because two years from now, three years from now, five years from now, we need to be bringing this deficit down when the economy grows because then you'll have the private markets needing capital.”

    The remarks from the former president come as he's increased his presence on the campaign trail. He appeared with Obama a series of fundraisers in New York City Monday night, as well as campaigned for Democrats trying to recall Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and had to clarify comments that he made praising Mitt Romney's tenure at Bain Capital.
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    Jun 05, 2012 10:50 PM GMT
    Where's the stories about Bush campaigning with Romney?
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    Jun 05, 2012 11:03 PM GMT
    socalfitness saidhttp://thehill.com/video/in-the-news/231019-bill-clinton-placeholder

    Former President Clinton broke with President Obama over the Bush-era tax rates, saying he has “no problem” with extending them temporarily.

    “I don't have any problem with extending all of it now, including the current spending level,” Clinton told CNBC Tuesday in a taped interview for "Closing Bell."

    Obama only wants to extend the tax rate for middle-class taxpayers — and not for the wealthy — when the rates expire on Jan. 1.

    Clinton, however, said all the rates should not be extended permanently.

    “The real issue is whether the price the Republican House will put on that extension is the permanent extension of the tax cuts, which I think is an error,” he said.

    House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) has pressed to extend the tax rates immediately, before the November election, but has said the decision over whether to act to make the extension permanent or temporary has not been made.

    Clinton said it would probably be “best” to push the extension through early next year.

    “But the Republicans don't want to do that unless [Obama] agrees to extend the tax cuts permanently, including for upper-income people,” he said. “And I don't think the president should do that.”

    Republicans quickly blasted out Clinton’s remarks as him breaking with Obama.

    “Agree [with] former President Clinton,” Boehner tweeted. “Raising taxes next year would be bad for [for] jobs.”

    But Clinton did not entirely side with Republicans in the interview.

    "What I think we need to do is find some way to avoid the fiscal cliff, to avoid doing anything that would contract the economy now, and then deal with what's necessary in the long term debt-reduction plans as soon as they can, which presumably would be after the election," Clinton said.

    “But what I think the president is right about is not wanting to make any commitments that will constrain our ability to have a long-term debt reduction plan," he continued, "because two years from now, three years from now, five years from now, we need to be bringing this deficit down when the economy grows because then you'll have the private markets needing capital.”

    The remarks from the former president come as he's increased his presence on the campaign trail. He appeared with Obama a series of fundraisers in New York City Monday night, as well as campaigned for Democrats trying to recall Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and had to clarify comments that he made praising Mitt Romney's tenure at Bain Capital.


    I trust he means another couple of years. The uncertainty is already causing my business problems. And we build buildings that house businesses and employee people.
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    Jun 05, 2012 11:44 PM GMT
    southbeach1500 saidPres Clinton breaks with Obama on extending Bush-era tax rates

    This is such an obviously good thing to do (extending the tax rates) that it is incomprehensible why Obama hasn't done it.


    It's funny how some right-wingers whine endless about the debt and deficit, but want to extend tax cuts that cost trillions and add to same. icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Jun 05, 2012 11:51 PM GMT
    southbeach1500 saidPres Clinton breaks with Obama on extending Bush-era tax rates

    This is such an obviously good thing to do (extending the tax rates) that it is incomprehensible why Obama hasn't done it.

    All supports reports of two competing camps within the Democratic Party. Clinton is considered a leader or the leader of a moderate liberal group that is pragmatic and business friendly. Obama and Pelosi represent the far left, catering to environmental extremists more, generally business-hostile, and more concerned about reducing class disparity, even at the expense of growth. If Obama is defeated this fall, I predict the far left radicals will be cast aside and the more moderates will take control of the party. Would probably be good for more moderates in social issues as the Democrats would once again be a place for socially moderate free-market types, and the Republicans would have to compete more for this segment.
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    Jun 07, 2012 3:05 AM GMT
    More here:
    http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0612/77092.html

    Last week, former President Bill Clinton disavowed a central theme of President Barack Obama’s reelection campaign. Tuesday, he added that a key piece of the White House’s policy agenda doesn’t make much sense to him either.

    With friends like this, Obama’s political enemies don’t need to do too much.

    In an interview with CNBC that his office was scrambling to clarify Tuesday night, Clinton sided with congressional Republicans over Obama in calling for Congress to temporarily renew the soon-to-expire Bush tax cuts — but he also heaped praise on private equity companies like Mitt Romney’s Bain Capital, pleaded ignorance for his past gaffes and asserted his independence from the Obama campaign message operation.

    It was Clinton in full Mr. Hyde mode — in a flashback to the deep and lasting tensions between the Clinton family and the Obama team that still linger from the bitter 2008 primary fight.

    The interview was part of a whirlwind television tour Tuesday afternoon, with Clinton spending also granting interviews to NBC, PBS and CBS that followed up on his turn last week on CNN, when he referred to Romney’s business background — which the Obama campaign had spent days tearing apart — as “sterling.” Once again, Clinton was sucking up all the media oxygen and generating dozens of headlines about an intra-party split between the two presidents.

    It took Hillary Clinton’s campaign a good part of the 2008 primary season to realize the damage that the former president’s straight talking, can’t-be-muzzled ways could do — after he helped sink his own wife’s chances at the presidency in advance of the South Carolina primary by alienating black voters. It took the Obama campaign only one week to learn the same lesson, as Clinton swung wildly between effective surrogate and major headache.

    Talking about the economic crisis in Europe and the persistent economic malaise in the United States, Clinton told CBNC that extending the Bush-era tax cuts across the board was “probably the best thing to do right now.”
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    Jun 07, 2012 3:25 AM GMT
    It's useful to note though that Clinton, as a party stalwart, is smart enough to endorse Obama but his moves to work against him are far more telling.
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    Jun 07, 2012 3:34 AM GMT
    riddler78 saidIt's useful to note though that Clinton, as a party stalwart, is smart enough to endorse Obama but his moves to work against him are far more telling.

    Also here:
    http://www.foxnews.com/on-air/oreilly/index.html#/v/1677302438001/president-clinton-sabotaging-president-obama/?playlist_id=86923
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    Jun 09, 2012 5:32 PM GMT
    And here - the Obama Administration has also been apparently alluding to the idea that Clinton may be suffering from dementia with his contradictions of Obama -

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/kathleen-parker-nobody-likes-a-loser/2012/06/08/gJQAPOtiOV_story.html?wprss=rss_opinions

    Democrats seem to be inching away from their man, undermining and diminishing the president with a thousand tiny cuts. Not even his strongest alleged ally, Bill Clinton, can stay on message. Of course, Clinton has never really been Obama’s friend, despite his assertions to the contrary.

    Does Clinton think that Obama has been a good president? Of course not. He thinks that he was a good president and that his wife would have been better than Obama. In 2008, when Clinton infamously dismissed Obama’s imminent primary victory in South Carolina by noting that even Jesse Jackson had won there, he was showing his true colors. Translation: Obama won because he was black, not because he was the best candidate.

    Clinton’s intended point that African Americans vaulted Obama over the bar wasn’t false. African Americans constituted more than half of all South Carolina primary voters, and 78 percent of them voted for Obama. Even so, the observation could have been left unsaid.

    Recently, Clinton has expressed similarly true observations that he might have kept to himself. If, that is, he were truly interested in helping Obama get reelected. In one television interview, Clinton praised Romney’s “sterling” business record, the same one Obama has been criticizing. In another, he said the Bush tax cuts may as well be extended since it isn’t likely that a large debt-reduction plan will be considered until after the election. This wasn’t exactly an endorsement of the tax cuts, but it wasn’t precisely on the same page as the president either.

    In what is becoming a trend, the Obama campaign moved swiftly to explain and contain. In a cruel twist, the narrative has emerged that Ol’ Bill may be getting just a bit dotty. A Politico story quoted Clinton “associates” who asserted that the former president, while mentally sharp, is, you know, well, getting older.

    “He’s 65 years old,” said an unnamed adviser, as though that explains everything. Sixty-five is hardly teetering on the brink of senility, though people of a certain age do have a charming, devil-may-care way of saying what they really think and letting the chips fall.
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    Jun 09, 2012 6:25 PM GMT
    riddler78 saidIt's useful to note though that Clinton, as a party stalwart, is smart enough to endorse Obama but his moves to work against him are far more telling.



    When Dianne Feinstein brought Obama and Hillary together one night for a serious conference at her home here in San Francisco, to iron out their differences, it became apparent that Obama and the Clintons don't share views on very many issues.
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    Jun 09, 2012 6:32 PM GMT
    riddler78 saidAnd here - the Obama Administration has also been apparently alluding to the idea that Clinton may be suffering from dementia with his contradictions of Obama -

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/kathleen-parker-nobody-likes-a-loser/2012/06/08/gJQAPOtiOV_story.html?wprss=rss_opinions

    Democrats seem to be inching away from their man, undermining and diminishing the president with a thousand tiny cuts. Not even his strongest alleged ally, Bill Clinton, can stay on message. Of course, Clinton has never really been Obama’s friend, despite his assertions to the contrary.

    Does Clinton think that Obama has been a good president? Of course not. He thinks that he was a good president and that his wife would have been better than Obama. In 2008, when Clinton infamously dismissed Obama’s imminent primary victory in South Carolina by noting that even Jesse Jackson had won there, he was showing his true colors. Translation: Obama won because he was black, not because he was the best candidate.

    Clinton’s intended point that African Americans vaulted Obama over the bar wasn’t false. African Americans constituted more than half of all South Carolina primary voters, and 78 percent of them voted for Obama. Even so, the observation could have been left unsaid.

    Recently, Clinton has expressed similarly true observations that he might have kept to himself. If, that is, he were truly interested in helping Obama get reelected. In one television interview, Clinton praised Romney’s “sterling” business record, the same one Obama has been criticizing. In another, he said the Bush tax cuts may as well be extended since it isn’t likely that a large debt-reduction plan will be considered until after the election. This wasn’t exactly an endorsement of the tax cuts, but it wasn’t precisely on the same page as the president either.

    In what is becoming a trend, the Obama campaign moved swiftly to explain and contain. In a cruel twist, the narrative has emerged that Ol’ Bill may be getting just a bit dotty. A Politico story quoted Clinton “associates” who asserted that the former president, while mentally sharp, is, you know, well, getting older.

    “He’s 65 years old,” said an unnamed adviser, as though that explains everything. Sixty-five is hardly teetering on the brink of senility, though people of a certain age do have a charming, devil-may-care way of saying what they really think and letting the chips fall.


    Romney is certainly a very young 65.