Greg Louganis: The Toughest Sissy in the World: The Moment I Triumphed Over My Bullies

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 06, 2012 10:31 AM GMT
    I would think that someone would have already posted this, but I don't see it.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/greg-louganis/the-toughest-sissy-in-the-world_b_1569369.html
  • Bunjamon

    Posts: 3161

    Jun 06, 2012 11:32 AM GMT
    Very inspiring article.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 06, 2012 11:50 AM GMT
    This was awesome... I didn't accept my sexuality for many years, but I remember being enthralled with this man watching the Olympics. He had a perfect body, face and a grounded and enthusiastic disposition. What a wonderful man.... I have always had a soft (hard) spot for him.

    And then in this article he wrote this:

    Each of us has a hero inside us and a uniqueness that we may not see at first, because we are so concerned with "fitting in." We may have a different walk or talk, a different way of learning, a physical appearance that doesn't match others' expectations, or a different way of expressing ourselves. In time, in my own experience, I learned to celebrate my uniqueness, cherish who I am as a human being, and act out of love and compassion for my fellow human beings. And, to borrow my mom's saying, "I make everywhere I go better, because I was there." I practice that every day and live it to the best of my ability.

    That is a great start to my day! Thank you for posting!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 06, 2012 11:56 AM GMT
    JPtheBITCH saidThat was disturbing.....he talks of the man who raped him at knifepoint and then he stayed with him for six years??


    I wouldn't call it disturbing so much as evidence that even the strongest among us can make bad decisions, often not based in logic. I think many of us have made these sort of unwise choices where love is concerned.
  • Splendidus_1

    Posts: 611

    Jun 06, 2012 12:04 PM GMT
    JPtheBITCH saidThat was disturbing.....he talks of the man who raped him at knifepoint and then he stayed with him for six years??


    Could it be kind of like the Stockholm syndrome? But without the being hold captive, and being raped instead. I don't know .. but it does sound weird.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 06, 2012 12:12 PM GMT
    It is a typical domestic violence situation. It sounds to me like he was in a relationship that was abusive and he didn't understand how to get out of it. Unfortunately, domestic violence crosses all gender, ethnic, racial and socioeconomic boundaries. I am glad that he found the strength to walk away... too many men and women dont.

    ( I was a prosecutor for a large part of my career and I prosecuted and taught domestic violence and sexual assault cases. It is a serious problem that is often misunderstood. )
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 06, 2012 1:04 PM GMT
    If you haven't been in a violent relationship, you don't/can't/won't understand being in a violent relationship.

    My father was a narcissistic drunk who beat my sister, my mother and me for years. He nearly killed my mother on several occasions. He broke several fingers and would punch me so regularly you could set your clock to his attacks. I got out when I left for the military.

    Well, when I met my first boyfriend, is it any coincidence that he was a narcissistic drunk with a violent streak. I stayed with him for several years. He put me in the hospital several times. I was too ashamed/abused/coerced/intimidated to leave, despite pleas from my family, friends and coworkers. Eventually I had to come to my own realization that if I stayed he would get angry and violent and if I left, he would get angry and violent.

    So I left and things got better, eventually. Not overnight. Sometimes it takes a while to break through those old psychological wounds and patterns that pervade your thinking.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 06, 2012 2:31 PM GMT


    I had this weird period back in my 30s 40s when I don't know how many people told me I looked like Greg Louganis. I guess maybe we were greying similarly. And I think he lived in town at the time. I never saw the resemblence myself but I did seem to get very good tables and service at the local restaurants.

    I'm only familiar with domestic, physical abuse 2nd hand. My first partner was abused as a child and also I know of abuse within a family that I've been close to since I was born, our mother's being best friends.

    In my partner's case, he was a great guy and we only had two fights in 10 years, once because he wouldn't bathe the fucking dog and I was so pissed, stupid, I know, and the other time was entirely my fault. He's driving us into NYC to party, I've always been prone to injury and scratched a scab open that started bleeding next to him. It was just after AIDS became known. As far as we knew neither of us had it but I panicked and he got pissed. I was in my 20s and couldn't control my anxiety, we get out of the car and he almost smashes me into it. He's just about to get violent and he stops himself cold, right in his tracks. Releases me and we just talked.

    It was the only time he ever tried that. I'd never seen that side of him before nor since. He was badly abused by both parents and his brother. The worst of the stories was when they locked him in an old refrigerator and threw it into the pool.

    Yet I knew the family as being loving towards each other. You wouldn't know from the outside that there was so much violence earlier in their lives. Same with this other family I know. I've spoken to the mom who used to hit about that. And she has trouble seeing herself doing that, even though she knows she did. The kids wound up being pretty screwed up. One is dead by drug abuse, one is brilliant but completely screwed up in the head, the youngest, one of my dearest friends, is constantly in therapy but she's come a long way.

    Even with all of the abuse, for the most part, love binds them. I've had not physical abuse but mental abuse in my own life which I allowed because of love. I was raised to love this person. We were put together to play with each other since we were babies. It finally ended and I would not allow it again, but for a lot of years I let a cousin treat me like shit and the whole time I told myself that I was the stronger of us, that she had this odd need to hurt people but that she didn't mean it, that I could take it. blablafuckingbla. For the most part that was true, at the time at least that was true. Until she became so freaking abusive that she broke our relationship completely. It's still very sad because the love is still there. I won't allow it to happen again and so that becomes one of the tragedies of my life. Very few lives entirely escape them.

    "Into each life some rain must fall"~~Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 06, 2012 3:05 PM GMT
    MuscleBadger saidThis was awesome... I didn't accept my sexuality for many years, but I remember being enthralled with this man watching the Olympics. He had a perfect body, face and a grounded and enthusiastic disposition. What a wonderful man.... I have always had a soft (hard) spot for him.

    And then in this article he wrote this:

    Each of us has a hero inside us and a uniqueness that we may not see at first, because we are so concerned with "fitting in." We may have a different walk or talk, a different way of learning, a physical appearance that doesn't match others' expectations, or a different way of expressing ourselves. In time, in my own experience, I learned to celebrate my uniqueness, cherish who I am as a human being, and act out of love and compassion for my fellow human beings. And, to borrow my mom's saying, "I make everywhere I go better, because I was there." I practice that every day and live it to the best of my ability.

    That is a great start to my day! Thank you for posting!


    Couldn't agree more. This is a great passage from the piece.


  • jhill2456

    Posts: 285

    Jun 06, 2012 3:33 PM GMT
    JPtheBITCH saidThat was disturbing.....he talks of the man who raped him at knifepoint and then he stayed with him for six years??


    Greg went through alot and he's a better man because of it. There is someone out there who needs to hear this story and I'm glad Greg is still around to tell it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 06, 2012 5:48 PM GMT
    Awesome inspiration for all of us.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 06, 2012 7:56 PM GMT
    I almost didn't post this thinking someone else certainly had and I didn't want to be redundant. Glad I took a chance and posted anyway.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 07, 2012 12:11 AM GMT
    freedomisntfree saidI almost didn't post this thinking someone else certainly had and I didn't want to be redundant. Glad I took a chance and posted anyway.


    Actually, it was posted, but didn't get much response. I actually thought I was posting onto that thread when I saw this post by you.

    http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/2423038
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 07, 2012 12:27 AM GMT
    Thanks for posting this article...it's very inspiring and touching.