The hunter -gatherer 'work out style' may be the best regime

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    Jun 07, 2012 6:08 AM GMT
    Are modern working out regimes missing something? Are Marathons bad for your fitness? Yes and yes ...What are the best mix of aerobic and anaerobic? ....Future gyms will need to be re-invented... Many experts have known this all along....

    So what is best or better?....This is an excerpt taken from a discussion with Mercola, MD and Phil Campbell, fitness expert

    ".... Too Much Cardio Can Even Damage Your Heart

    One of the best examples of the risks of over-exercising can be gleaned from marathon runners. Running a marathon is often seen as the epitome of fitness and the ultimate show of endurance. But it puts an extraordinary stress on your heart.

    According to a study presented at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress 2010 in Montreal, regular exercise reduces cardiovascular risk by a factor of two or three. But the extended vigorous exercise performed during a marathon raises cardiac risk by seven-fold! Long-distance running also leads to high levels of inflammation that may trigger cardiac eventsi and damage your heart long after the marathon is over.

    In a study published in the Journal of Applied Physiology,ii researchers recruited a group of extremely fit older men. All of them were members of the 100 Marathon club, meaning athletes who had completed a minimum of 100 marathons. If running marathons provided cardiovascular benefit this would certainly be the group you would want to seriously examine. So what did they find?

    Half of the older lifelong athletes showed some heart muscle scarring as a result, and they were specifically the men who had trained the longest and hardest.

    Research has also revealed heart scarring after elite cardio training. Published in the journal Circulation,iii an animal study was designed to mimic the strenuous daily exercise load of serious marathoners over the course of 10 years. All the rats had normal, healthy hearts at the outset of the study, but by the end most of them had developed "diffuse scarring and some structural changes, similar to the changes seen in the human endurance athletes."

    Yet another study showed that long-term endurance athletes suffer from diminished function of the right ventricle of the heart after endurance racing.iv They also had increased blood levels of cardiac enzymes, which are markers for heart injury, and 12 percent of the athletes had detectable scar tissue on their heart muscle one week post-race. So it is more than likely that if you over-exercise you will do your body great harm.

    Ideally, to get the most benefits you need to push your body hard enough for a challenge while allowing adequate time for recovery and repair to take place. It turns out that one of the best ways to do this is to follow a fitness regimen that mimics the movements of our hunter-gatherer ancestors, which included short bursts of high-intensity activities -- but not long-distance running such as is required to complete a marathon or even an hour on the treadmill.

    ..... and ....

    Short Bursts of High-Intensity Exercise Gives You More Benefits in Less Time

    Earlier I mentioned an incredibly efficient workout that you can complete in just 20 minutes. I was referring to Peak Fitness. After a three-minute warm up, you raise your heart rate up to your anaerobic threshold for 20 to 30 seconds (this can be done by sprinting, using an elliptical machine, recumbent bike, etc.), followed by a 90-second recovery period. Then repeat that cycle for a total of eight repetitions, as shown ....."

    read more:
    http://fitness.mercola.com/sites/fitness/archive/2012/06/01/long-cardio-workout-dangers.aspx?e_cid=20120601_DNL_art_1
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    Jun 07, 2012 6:17 AM GMT
    xybender saidThe hunter -gatherer 'work out style' may be the best regime
    With the Paleo Diet (principles - not the fad) becoming more accepted in the fitness world, it's no surprise that the "workout style" of the hunter-gatherers isn't following far behind.

    If those from that era had the medical technology that we have today, those folks would be living way past their 100's...with a great quality of life for most of those years.
  • calibro

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    Jun 07, 2012 11:33 AM GMT
    there was a brilliant article by an anthropologist who basically called shenanigans on the entire concept of paleo-anything. she brilliantly pointed out our ancestors differed in diet and habit greatly by area, and that there is no conclusive way to say they did one thing and that it was actually better. if anything, our bodies have greatly evolved from those days, mainly in the shrinking of our legs.

    "Many nutrition scientists give the paleo-diet a thumbs-down. They worry about its dearth of carbohydrates, its cost, its impracticality, and the fact that its boasts for good health are medically unproven. For my part, I'll focus on the paleo-anthropology.

    Our ancestors began to eat meat in large quantities around 2 million years ago, when the first Homo forms began regular use of stone tool technology. Before that, the diet of australopithecines and their relatives was overwhelmingly plant-based, judging from clues in teeth and bones. I could argue that the more genuine "paleo" diet was vegetarian.

    More worrisome are persistent attempts to match a modern diet to an "average" Paleolithic one, or Loren Cordain's insistence that "we were genetically designed to eat lean meat and fish and other foods that made up the diet of our Paleolithic ancestors."

    Here's where science most forcefully speaks back. First, ancient hunter-gatherer groups adapted to local environments that were regionally and seasonally variable — for instance, coastal or inland, game-saturated or grain-abundant (eating grains was not necessarily incompatible with hunter-gatherer living). Second, genes were not in control. People learned what worked in local context for survival and reproduction, and surely, just as in other primates, cultural traditions began to play a role in who ate what.

    In short, there was no single hunter-gatherer foraging strategy, and genes no more "designed" our eating behavior than they designed our language or our ways of relating between the genders."
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    Jun 07, 2012 2:33 PM GMT
    ^like
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    Jun 07, 2012 3:21 PM GMT
    calibro saidthere was a brilliant article by an anthropologist who basically called shenanigans on the entire concept of paleo-anything. she brilliantly pointed out our ancestors differed in diet and habit greatly by area, and that there is no conclusive way to say they did one thing and that it was actually better. if anything, our bodies have greatly evolved from those days, mainly in the shrinking of our legs.
    The basic principle of the Paleo diet is the absence of processed foods. Any nutritionist who claims that's unhealthy is simply working for the food industry - not the people.
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    Jun 07, 2012 3:24 PM GMT
    paulflexes said
    calibro saidthere was a brilliant article by an anthropologist who basically called shenanigans on the entire concept of paleo-anything. she brilliantly pointed out our ancestors differed in diet and habit greatly by area, and that there is no conclusive way to say they did one thing and that it was actually better. if anything, our bodies have greatly evolved from those days, mainly in the shrinking of our legs.
    The basic principle of the Paleo diet is the absence of processed foods. Any nutritionist who claims that's unhealthy is simply working for the food industry - not the people.


    mmm processed foods.....
    cheetos-puffs.gif
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    Jun 08, 2012 3:42 AM GMT
    So the moral of the story is don't run 100 marathons????
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    Jun 08, 2012 3:56 AM GMT
    I do a combinations of things... I can't run huge marathons, but I do plan on doing one of those Trojan Runs in a year or two.