Republicans Have Become Party of 'No' Conservatives Turn Rejectionism a Political Way of Life - herein lies the problem with stalled government and the economy

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    Jun 11, 2012 1:56 PM GMT
    By J.J. Goldberg from the 'Forward Forum'

    "Last week, alert readers recall ......we studied the suppression of the majority by a determined minority. Suppressing a minority isn’t pretty, but suppressing the majority is really ugly. ..... its “main representative bodies” no longer speak out as they once did on the moral issues of social and economic justice that most .... care about. They’re stymied by vehement conservative minorities.

    This week, we’ll broaden our lens a bit and look at wider national trends that mirror the Jewish dilemma. Here the issue isn’t suppression of a majority, but something different: congressional gridlock and government paralysis, leaving us with a growing sense of helplessness in the face of fiscal and other crises.


    The cause, it’s usually said, is polarization of the parties and the electorate. But even-handedness is misleading. Despite all the media chatter about the two parties moving toward their extremes, there’s mounting evidence that the radicalization is mostly on one side — the right."


    This week, we’ll broaden our lens a bit and look at wider national trends that mirror the Jewish dilemma. Here the issue isn’t suppression of a majority, but something different: congressional gridlock and government paralysis, leaving us with a growing sense of helplessness in the face of fiscal and other crises.

    We’re talking about hard, statistical evidence. It’s compiled by conservative as well as liberal researchers. For example, the center-right National Journal reported in its annual congressional Vote Ratings for 2011, released in February 2012, that for “the second year in a row, but only the third time in the 30 years that National Journal has published these ratings, no Senate Democrat compiled a voting record to the right of any Senate Republican, and no Republican came down on the left of any Senate Democrat.” The report didn’t pin blame, but the numbers spoke for themselves. Each lawmaker’s voting record for the year was computed on a 100-point conservative-liberal scale. The meeting point was around 52 on the conservative side. That is, the most conservative Democrats were more conservative than liberal, and the most liberal Republicans were to the right of that. Picturing the ratings like a football field, the midpoint was on the Republicans’ 48 yard line. The numbers for 2010 were even starker: Four Democrats were solidly conservative and the most liberal Republicans didn’t get past their own 40 yard line. The midpoint was on the Republicans’ 41 yard line.

    Similar results appear in a study of voters released June 4 by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press. The study tracked voters’ changing responses over a quarter-century on 48 different values questions, from abortion to the environment to government help for the needy. The report says self-described Democrats have moved to the left and Republicans have moved to the right. Looking at the numbers, though, the Democrats’ shifts are generally slight and occasionally rightward, while the Republicans’ overall shift is astronomical and uniformly rightward.

    The most talked-about new political book this spring is the just released “It’s Even Worse Than It Looks: How the American Constitutional System Collided With the New Politics of Extremism.” Co-written by political scholars Norman Ornstein of the staunchly conservative American Enterprise Institute and Thomas Mann of the liberal Brookings Institution, it is essentially a searing indictment of the Republican Party’s drift to the extreme right, which it claims is the main cause of our national dilemma.

    The duo laid out their essential thesis in an April 27 Washington Post op-ed essay titled “Let’s Just Say It: The Republicans Are the Problem.” Here’s the bottom line:

    “The GOP has become an insurgent outlier in American politics. It is ideologically extreme; scornful of compromise; unmoved by conventional understanding of facts, evidence and science, and dismissive of the legitimacy of its political opposition.

    “When one party moves this far from the mainstream, it makes it nearly impossible for the political system to deal constructively with the country’s challenges.”

    The shift began during the Reagan years, but went into high gear with Newt Gingrich’s election as speaker of the House in 1995. That was the year that the GOP became the Party of No. "


    WHAT DO WE DO TO END THIS INTRANSIGENCE ?
  • GQjock

    Posts: 11649

    Jun 11, 2012 2:31 PM GMT
    Problem is .......

    Is that we now have a system of government that cannot govern
    We have a party that has signed onto a view that id unsustainable when it comes to governing and protecting its people
    A party that has given itself fully to the religious right whereby any civil rights protections for minorities are blocked
    where any protection from corporate malfeasance is stopped because of lobbying influence
    where any increase in taxes for any reason at all has been stopped because one man said so
    and to top it all off we now have the ability for anyone with enough cash to buy an entire election

    and where is the commonality in all of this?
    It lies within the republican party
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    Jun 11, 2012 7:36 PM GMT
    GQjock saidProblem is .......

    Is that we now have a system of government that cannot govern
    We have a party that has signed onto a view that id unsustainable when it comes to governing and protecting its people
    A party that has given itself fully to the religious right whereby any civil rights protections for minorities are blocked
    where any protection from corporate malfeasance is stopped because of lobbying influence
    where any increase in taxes for any reason at all has been stopped because one man said so
    and to top it all off we now have the ability for anyone with enough cash to buy an entire election

    and where is the commonality in all of this?
    It lies within the republican party




    I couldn't agree more !!


    Arm in arm with the facts you bring out, is the Republican party primary and oft repeated goal to make "Obama a one term president", this goal was facilitated by all of the above which in turn stymied any hope of sustainable economic recovery. Republicans are very good at the Goebels Proaganda technique of being the author of a problem then loudly blaming the vicitms and repeating the lies over and over again.

    In the end, if they win at the expense of the American economy thereby holding down the majority populations, they will still consider themselve successfull, then proclaim more lies to further dupe their ignorant FOX/Palin/Beck and Limbaugh followers.