Who Here Has Bipolar Disorder? Explain Your Symptoms And Signs.

  • tautomer

    Posts: 1010

    Jun 12, 2012 5:00 AM GMT
    Who here has been diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder? What I mean by diagnosed is that a doctor or professional has actually formally stated that you have it. For what I am looking for, I want to hear legitimate accounts. I have a susipcion that I may actually have this as opposed to depression and GAD (of which I was formally diagnosed with 2 years ago). Note I don't medicate.

    I want to hear the signs, symptoms, and experiences you have with BPD. The reason I am asking this, is I want to hear a few stories and accounts from people before I put time and energy into seeing a psychologist to reassess my mental conditions. Hearing these accounts will refine down whether or not I likely have BPD or not.

    Thanks!
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    Jun 12, 2012 7:05 AM GMT
    Are you sure you don't want to get tips on how to control the appointment with the doc, so that you can report/not report the symptoms and change the diagnosis?

    It's best if you know nothing, go in to see the doc, be as honest and objective as you can, and let him/her do her assessment.

    I understand the desire to know first, but it's for your own benefit that the diagnosis be as accurate as possible, and it does you no real favour self-diagnosing first.
  • tautomer

    Posts: 1010

    Jun 12, 2012 7:45 AM GMT
    That won't happen. Not that you have any reason to, but, just trust me on that one. I've been going to psychologists since I was 4 years old. I have learned the hard way in elementry school on what happens if you fit yourself to a disorder.

    That, and any type of formal diagnosis takes time, not just one session. A lot of interview stuff will go on to sort it out, and I would go into this with the most open mind and clear slate as possible. All I would simply do is account my own stories and experiences, and answer their questions to the best of my ability.
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    Jun 12, 2012 8:06 AM GMT
    If you've been seeing them that long, how has none of them thought you might be bipolar?? They asked me questions like that when I first started seeing my mental health doc. Like the first day upon admitting me.
  • masculumpedes

    Posts: 5549

    Jun 12, 2012 10:00 AM GMT
    Also, unless I am mistaken, aren't you a recovering addict? Wouldn't the chemical imbalances in your body from previous use cause a different diagnosis from someone who never indulged? icon_confused.gif
  • a303guy

    Posts: 829

    Jun 12, 2012 12:11 PM GMT
    OKOK, I'll take the bait. SkinnyB does have some good points, which I agree with - 'self-assessing' is about as bad as 'self-medicating' - so I'm going to tread carefully here.

    Quick history on me - I'm bi-polar, ADHD, and Dyslectic. So yeah, I have a hard time reading, cant concentrate, run around like a chicken with my head cut off and then get seriously pissed or happy about it.

    Sounds like a pretty horrid fate, but when its the hand life's dealt you, you either let it overcome you, or you hotch up your knicks and work with it. I chose the latter, but not before it damn near killed me. Figuring out that I'm gay was just icing on the cake.

    I agree with Skinny in that it is a little odd that you've been seeing a psychologist since you were 4 and there hasn't been an assessment handed to you or your parents indicating the possibility, or that the psychologist hasn't referred you to a psychiatrist (they're the ones that can dispense medication)

    Which tells me either you have a horrible psychologist, or that you're not bi-polar at all. (just being moody little cunt doesn't mean your bi-polar) ;)

    One thing I did learn about my condition is that bi-polarity may have some genetic foundation, and is likely passed from generation to generation - which is true in my mothers side of the family - the last 3 generations have all had indications (my mother is bi-polar, 1 of her sisters is as well, another suffers from depression, her mother had severe depressions, her mother's mother was well known as a raging queen) that something may be brain-chemistry amiss. So I'd look at your family tree and see if there are any clues there.

    The second thing is that if you truly are assessed as having some bi-polarity conditions, and that medication is advised, that you go into the medical treatment with an open mind, and that you agree to communicate what is happening to you with the meds very clearly and frequently with your prescribing doctor.

    Meds that are used for treating this illness are still a bit of a 'black art' - everyone's body chemistry is unique, and exactly how each med works on any person's given chemistry is different. For me, it took nearly 3 years of experimentation on me and my psychiatrist's part to find the right cocktail of medications to not just make me stable, but to become productive and happy. Additionally, brain chemistry does change over time, so occasional medication assessment visits to your psychiatrist are required, and will last a lifetime.

    I've been properly medicated since 1993, and as time has passed, my daily dosage of meds has steadily decreased, but that doesn't mean that's what will happen for you, nor does it mean that it will be that way for me into perpetuity. Getting proper exercise is absolutely essential, as that helps to keep your brain chemistry in check, and a daily dose of endorphins isn't a bad thing at all. Diet also plays an important part too, so there's two things you can do for yourself to keep things on an even keel.

    The main thing here is that for whatever reason you suspect that you are bi-polar, that's a call for some concern, but not panic. Get assessed by a professional, ask the hard, honest questions, and figure it out. I'm living proof that there is a good life out there if you are bi-polar, you just need to commit to work at it.
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    Jun 12, 2012 12:45 PM GMT
    a303guy said I'm living proof that there is a good life out there if you are bi-polar, you just need to commit to work at it.
    +1
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Jun 12, 2012 1:20 PM GMT
    Hearing these accounts will refine down whether or not I likely have BPD or not.


    hypo much?
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    Jun 12, 2012 3:14 PM GMT
    Bi-Polar can be an extremely dangerous illness...to the person who has it, and even more so, to everyone around them. It affects every aspect of the person's life...job, relationships, everything. Unfortunately, there is no "test" that can be done to diagnose it. Quite frequently, the bi-polar patient is mistakenly diagnosed with regular depression. The physician puts the patient on an anti-depressant medication, thinking it is going to help. But in a bi-polar patient, the anti-depressant actually makes the condition worse, by enhancing the mood swings...so, when they hit a low, it makes them severely depressed, and when they are riding a high, it amplifies the manic behavior. One of the problems is the bi-polar patient often doesn't think anything is wrong with them or their behavior, particularly when they are feeling good...they feel invincible, like they are Superman and can do anything. Very often they become hyper-sexual, causing them to engage in intimate encounters or relationships with others, even if they are already in a committed relationship and under normal circumstances would never have strayed otherwise. Behavior often can be violent. Some bi-polar patients only experience a few episodes in their lifetime, of differing durations. Others, known as "rapid cyclers" can bounce back and forth between despair and euphoria almost daily. This unstable nature of the bi-polar patient, and the condition itself, is why it can play havoc on the person, all aspects of their own life, and others' close to them. More often than not, the condition is worse for others in the patient's life to live with than the patient since they are very much unaware of their actions most of the time. Another reason it can difficult for a doctor to properly diagnose a bi-polar patient is due to the fact that many patients, liking the way they feel on the manic high wave of the mood swings, are hesitant to be honest with the doctor about their symptoms for fear of BEING medicated and the meds dampening their good feelings.

    My ex was diagnosed with bi-polar. We were together almost eight years before he had an episode. It was a horrendously difficult thing to live through. Within three months, he had lost his job, started an affair with someone else, and it destroyed our relationship. We went to a therapist and they tried several different anti-depressants to help him, and all they did was enhance his chemical imbalance. I would sit there and watch him downplay his moods and behavior and at times outright lie as to his actions and behavior. I was warned that I could be facing a bi-polar condition with him and it could get dangerous and to be careful. More often than not, the way a doctor can definitively diagnose the condition is when the patient does something extreme. Extreme for my ex was to hold a knife to my throat and try to kill me one night during an otherwise typical argument. He just snapped and attacked me. The efficiently ended the relationship, as I could simply not live with him anymore. It was destroying ME. He never did seek additional help or medication, although he definitely should have. With a bi-polar patient, they require both an anti-depressant AND a mood stablizer like Lithium, taken together. In most cases, the proper dosage of the right medications can get the condition under control and it is manageable. However, like most patients who have any illness, the natural tendency when they start to feel better is to stop taking the medications, as they feel they don't need them any longer. This is especially true for bi-polar patients since they "block out" much of their manic behavior...it is almost like they are two people and cannot believe their behavior, when explained to them. I was shocked at how little my ex remembered of his horrible behavior. And he REALLY didn't recall a lot of the things he said and did. The therapist confirmed this was also quite typical.

    My advice would be to do everything you can to pursue answers from knowledgable physicians and try your best to recall and be honest with them about your symptoms, good and bad. The more they know, the better they can help. And medications, if diagnosed, are absolutely essential, to be taken like clockwork, every day. A bi-polar condition is not something that goes away on it's own. It may lay dormant for extended periods of time, but can always resurface. Good luck!
  • tautomer

    Posts: 1010

    Jun 12, 2012 3:56 PM GMT
    malefeet saidAlso, unless I am mistaken, aren't you a recovering addict? Wouldn't the chemical imbalances in your body from previous use cause a different diagnosis from someone who never indulged? icon_confused.gif


    You are mistaken. Never been an addict to anything. I do have other issues, but they're well controlled. In the sense that I have a tremendous amount of self control. The other issues I have is that I have olfactory hallucinations (smell things that aren't there), and I also see lights. Had an MRI and EEG for that when it showed up when I was 18 but they were normal. I was also diagnosed with Aspergers when I was 9.

    For further info, mental disorders do run in my family (both sides). One of my grandmothers had severe depression, and some of my family members wonder if she was actually bipolar. My mother had agoraphobia for a number of years before I was born, and was diagnosed with depression when she was in her 30's.

    Trust me, I do not WANT to have BPD, or anything else. When your moods, feelings, and emotions and such start to get in the way of school and work, and overall things feel very off and wrong, one wonders, and looks to find out what the problem might be. I posted this a week or so ago, but this here really explains that something is not right with my head. I just want to know so I can do my best to manage things.
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    Jun 12, 2012 4:14 PM GMT
    tautomer4314 saidThe other issues I have is that I have olfactory hallucinations (smell things that aren't there), and I also see lights. Had an MRI and EEG for that when it showed up when I was 18 but they were normal. I was also diagnosed with Aspergers when I was 9.

    For further info, mental disorders do run in my family (both sides). One of my grandmothers had severe depression, and some of my family members wonder if she was actually bipolar. My mother had agoraphobia for a number of years before I was born, and was diagnosed with depression when she was in her 30's.

    Trust me, I do not WANT to have BPD, or anything else.


    Yeah, self-diagnosing might not be useful in your case, and with your cluster of symptoms. You should probably go speak to a mental health professional about why you think you might have bipolar disorder.

    BPD refers to borderline personality disorder, not bipolar disorder. Do you really mean BPD because that's a whole other animal. In order for a person to be diagnosed as bipolar there MUST be evidence or complaint of a mania. Just being depressed is not enough.

    Diagnoses are stigmatizing so you should be careful about labeling yourself unless you have thoroughly researched these conditions or been assessed by a trained professional -- preferably both.
  • tautomer

    Posts: 1010

    Jun 12, 2012 4:32 PM GMT
    Oh, I definitely mean bipolar disorder, NOT borderline personality disorder. I was just being lazy and abbreviating it.

    Also

    [quote]Diagnoses are stigmatizing so you should be careful about labeling yourself unless you have thoroughly researched these conditions or been assessed by a trained professional -- preferably both.[/quote]

    This is EXACTLY why I am asking about others experiences/stories here before I take any other steps. Just seeking a little info and others experiences to try and eliminate a few variables in my own mind.
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Jun 12, 2012 4:58 PM GMT
    TropicalMark said
    a303guy said I'm living proof that there is a good life out there if you are bi-polar, you just need to commit to work at it.
    +1


    I pretty much knew you were BP. Check your meds before attempting to cut down others on here.icon_idea.gif
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    Jun 12, 2012 5:21 PM GMT
    http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/bipolar-disorder/DS00356
  • HorrorHound

    Posts: 1435

    Jun 12, 2012 5:23 PM GMT
    Hey -- I myself have been diagnosed w/ BiPolar && BPD (Borderline) 2 years ago.

    While others are accurate on here there is a level of self-issues that arises w/ people who suffer/expereience livIng w/ the emotional rollercoaster on a daily/weekly level -- don't for one second listen to too many who say you'll ruin other's lives. This is a stigma that general public, media have sorta over-embellish . I, for one, am VERY aware of my depression (which bipolar is extreme sepression), & my "manic" high moments.

    Basically, yes being diagnosed w/ Bipolar adds a new level of issues that can hit you, its also something that can be maintained. Oh && I saw someone mention "take you bipolar meds" - ahem, while this is true at times - "anti-psychotic" meds, aka mood stabilizers, can do ALOT of harm to you & your body. Peolple have died on em before....they're no joke. Cognitive therapy is more useful to a patient than mood stabilizers.
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    Jun 12, 2012 6:15 PM GMT
    Jockbod48 said
    MikemikeMike said
    TropicalMark said
    a303guy said I'm living proof that there is a good life out there if you are bi-polar, you just need to commit to work at it.
    +1


    I pretty much knew you were BP. Check your meds before attempting to cut down others on here.icon_idea.gif


    This explains a great deal. The outbursts, the nastiness, the mood swings, the lashing out - all the "gotcha" style comments. Now we understand.


    Actually, you don't. None of those symptoms is descriptive of bipolar disorder, it's just descriptive of your and Mikemikemike's willingness to use cheap pop psychology to score cheap points and grind personal axes.
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    Jun 12, 2012 6:17 PM GMT
    SPOOKYdude saidCognitive therapy is more useful to a patient than mood stabilizers.


    That depends. This may be true of you, but it is not true of all people who need anti-psychotic drugs.
  • HorrorHound

    Posts: 1435

    Jun 12, 2012 6:22 PM GMT
    Im just trying to point out Anti-Psychotic meds can have disastrous effects when taking. If you do, expect to balloon up, even if you have a workout regime....cuz theres nothing you can do to stop that.

  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Jun 12, 2012 6:26 PM GMT
    i don't hate you because you're bi-polar... you're bi-polar because i hate you...

  • HorrorHound

    Posts: 1435

    Jun 12, 2012 6:30 PM GMT
    TroyAthlete said
    SPOOKYdude saidCognitive therapy is more useful to a patient than mood stabilizers.


    That depends. This may be true of you, but it is not true of all people who need anti-psychotic drugs.


    I'm sure we can all admit that theres more to maintaining the issues aside from popping a pill.

    I weaned off my anti-paychotic meds, been maintaining most of this manually for a while now, while the only med i take now is my Busbar (a long acting anti-anxiety med)....due to my social phobia diagnoses.

    While I do have many "manic" episodes (people have confused my natural "up" as me being on coke!), Its much more maintained than when I was actually on mood stabilizers, & not as sick/ill all the time from 'em. Hate them! Lol

    & the comment earlier about the symptoms of "mania", feeling "up" - so incredibly true!
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Jun 12, 2012 7:36 PM GMT
    One of the challenges of treating emotional and psychological problems is to find a good therapist. There are many excellent therapists, but there are also many very bad ones and they can do more harm than good. Also, it can be very difficult for a client to evaluate a therapist.

    I've known two people who were manic depressive, one man and one woman. The man's greatest problem was with the manic phase; he'd do things that were irresponsible when manic and lose jobs. He could also be a spendthrift. The depressive phase was unpleasant for him, but less dangerous. Actually, he didn't seem dangerous to others when he was manic. If someone disagreed with him, he just saw that person as incompetent and lacking in understanding. Sometimes he'd talk so fast that it was impossible to understand him.

    The woman tried to do too many things at once when manic, had unlimited energy, became irritable, unpredictable, and alienated others. I was very angry about a problem which she caused me and, had I known about her problem, I would never have accepted any kind of assistance from her. Her actions cost me thousands of dollars yet she was completely unable to understand what she had done. Her husband said that trying to reason with her when she was "that way" was impossible. Yet, when she was in a normal state, she was very nice, sweet, and helpful.

    That condition, when mild, is not very serious and doesn't keep people from living normal lives. But, when it is not mild and not controlled, it can destroy relationships and ruin lives.
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    Jun 13, 2012 12:05 AM GMT
    "I'm bipolar and hate it.

    Hell, I love it!

    Fuck you.

    Go fuck yourself.

    I'd do me.

    You're sick.

    Look in the mirror bitch, you'd do you too.

    *looks in mirror* OMG you're right! But I wouldn't do you.

    Go fuck yourself.

    Ok."

    BTW, I dated a bipolar dude for a few years. With meds he was ok. Without meds it was icon_eek.gif.
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    Jun 13, 2012 7:08 AM GMT
    TroyAthlete said
    Jockbod48 said
    MikemikeMike saidI pretty much knew you were BP. Check your meds before attempting to cut down others on here.icon_idea.gif

    This explains a great deal. The outbursts, the nastiness, the mood swings, the lashing out - all the "gotcha" style comments. Now we understand.

    Actually, you don't. None of those symptoms is descriptive of bipolar disorder, it's just descriptive of your and Mikemikemike's willingness to use cheap pop psychology to score cheap points and grind person axes.

    +1

    OP, if you go into the appointment saying "I have been experiencing issues (like _____, _____, ______) which is making me wonder if I'm bipolar". It's being honest and giving the doc's a chance to diagnose with all information relevant. 'Swhut I'd do. Even though a diagnosis might me stigmatizing, it is also good to have so that there are treatments that can be readily tried.
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    Jun 13, 2012 1:30 PM GMT
    Jockbod48 said
    MikemikeMike said
    TropicalMark said
    a303guy said I'm living proof that there is a good life out there if you are bi-polar, you just need to commit to work at it.
    +1


    I pretty much knew you were BP. Check your meds before attempting to cut down others on here.icon_idea.gif


    This explains a great deal. The outbursts, the nastiness, the mood swings, the lashing out - all the "gotcha" style comments. Now we understand. From here on - each and every post TM puts out there should be given the full attention (and sympathy) it deserves.


    Hey JockBod Buddy,

    Weren't you the one with the imaginary friend you posted for here on RJ? Come on now, you remember your super hot gastroenterologist friend with the pics you borrowed from Marcus Shenkenberg.

    You aren't the best person to lecture on personality disorders.
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    Jun 13, 2012 5:59 PM GMT
    Jockbod48 said
    MikemikeMike said
    TropicalMark said
    a303guy said I'm living proof that there is a good life out there if you are bi-polar, you just need to commit to work at it.
    +1


    I pretty much knew you were BP. Check your meds before attempting to cut down others on here.icon_idea.gif


    This explains a great deal. The outbursts, the nastiness, the mood swings, the lashing out - all the "gotcha" style comments. Now we understand. From here on - each and every post TM puts out there should be given the full attention (and sympathy) it deserves.
    LMAO........... I guess anyone who calls you on the carpet has a 'mental disorder'? Wow, you conservaidiots really take the cake.. Your little game last year failed because YOU made statements/allegations that were 'untrue' and you got busted for it. I have a memory like an elephant. Why is that? Because I dont tell stories that I have to remember to keep straight..

    I love this! You guys HATE anyone who 'stands up to you' and doesn't cower.

    This thread is about those with BiPolar disorder.. not your personal 'attack' thread.. you want to do that then take your ass back to the politics thread.